1

I'm familiar with JavaScript basics, but I'm trying to become more efficient with my code. To practice, I made a program that generates the Fibonacci sequence. This is my JavaScript code:

let currentDigit = 1;
let lastDigit = 0;
let text = document.getElementById('numbers');


for (i = 0; i<=30; i++) {
    let temp = currentDigit;
    text.innerHTML += " " + currentDigit;
    if(i !== 30) {
        text.innerHTML += ","
    }
    currentDigit += lastDigit;
    lastDigit = temp;
}

What improvements can I make on this for it to be cleaner, more efficient, and faster?

Codepen

4
  • 2
    Don't append to innerHTML; it makes the browser re-parse.
    – SLaks
    Dec 11, 2017 at 18:16
  • 2
    @Will in the future, please don't use Code Review as a reason to close a question. Evaluate the request and use a reason like too broad, primarily opinion-based, etc. Then you can mention to the OP that it can be posted on Code Review if it is on-topic. Please see the section What you should not do in this answer to A guide to Code Review for Stack Overflow users Dec 11, 2017 at 18:18
  • 1
    While it is better-suited for Code Review, that doesn't make it off-topic here, per se. Dec 11, 2017 at 18:25
  • 1
    How about e.g. const fibonacci = (n0, n1) => () => n1 = n0 + (n0 = n1); Array.from({length: 30}, fibonacci(0, 1)).join(', ')?
    – le_m
    Dec 11, 2017 at 18:39

2 Answers 2

2

(See Update for more efficient approach)

While this is not necessarily faster, it does allow for a separation of concerns and is definitely a cleaner approach. That is, using a generator function:

function * fibonacci (length, curr = 1, last = 0) {
  for (let i = 0; i < length; i++) {
    yield curr;
    [curr, last] = [curr + last, curr];
  }
}

let text = document.getElementById('numbers');

text.append(Array.from(fibonacci(31)).join(', '));
<div id="numbers"></div>

Just to clarify though, generator functions are generally not considered an optimized approach, as there's a lot of overhead to allow operations like yield and yield*.

Another point I can add regarding DOM manipulation is to create a text node and append() it to the #numbers element rather than causing the browser to completely re-parse the element as @SLaks pointed out. Doing so is indeed more efficient.

Update

Playing off of @le_m's comment, this would also work:

function fibonacci (length, next = 1, curr = 0) {
  const mapFn = () => {
    [next, curr] = [next + curr, next];
    return curr;
  };

  return Array.from({ length }, mapFn);
}

let text = document.getElementById('numbers');

text.append(fibonacci(31).join(', '));
<div id="numbers"></div>

7
  • How about text.textContent += ...?
    – le_m
    Dec 11, 2017 at 18:42
  • 1
    @le_m that would still cause a re-parse, though that does prevent some types of XSS attacks, unlike the usage of innerHTML. Dec 11, 2017 at 18:43
  • Just looked it up: setting textContent replaces all nodes within the element with a single new text node according to MDN - so it might be equally fast, but I never tested it.
    – le_m
    Dec 11, 2017 at 19:00
  • @le_m that's setting, not concatenating. i.e. = vs. +=. Dec 11, 2017 at 19:01
  • 1
    @DR01D in ES6, { length } is an object literal shorthand for { length: length }, since the variable name matches the property it's being assigned to in the literal. Dec 13, 2017 at 4:53
1

Here's an optimized version of your code, depending on how well destructuring assignment is optimized in the engine you're running.

let a = 0;
let b = 1;
text.append(" ", Array.from(Array(31), () => [a,b] = [b,a+b], a).join(", "));

let currentDigit = 1;
let lastDigit = 0;
let text = document.getElementById('numbers');

for (i = 0; i<=30; i++) {
    let temp = currentDigit;
    text.innerHTML += " " + currentDigit;
    if(i !== 30) {
        text.innerHTML += ","
    }
    currentDigit += lastDigit;
    lastDigit = temp;
}


text = document.getElementById('numbers2');
let a = 0;
let b = 1;
text.append(" ", Array.from(Array(31), () => ([a,b] = [b,a+b], a)).join(", "));
<pre id=numbers>Your version:</pre>
<pre id=numbers2>New version:</pre>


Or with a for-of loop, again depending on optimizations.

let a = 0;
let b = 1;
let arr = Array(31);
for (const i of arr.keys()) {
  arr[i] = ([a,b] = [b,a+b], a);
}
text.append(" ", arr.join(", "));

let currentDigit = 1;
let lastDigit = 0;
let text = document.getElementById('numbers');

for (i = 0; i<=30; i++) {
    let temp = currentDigit;
    text.innerHTML += " " + currentDigit;
    if(i !== 30) {
        text.innerHTML += ","
    }
    currentDigit += lastDigit;
    lastDigit = temp;
}


text = document.getElementById('numbers2');
let a = 0;
let b = 1;
let arr = Array(31);
for (const i of arr.keys()) {
  arr[i] = ([a,b] = [b,a+b], a);
}
text.append(" ", arr.join(", "));
<pre id=numbers>Your version:</pre>
<pre id=numbers2>New version:</pre>

2
  • Any significant difference between Array.from(Array(31), ...) and Array.from({length: 31}, ...)?
    – le_m
    Dec 11, 2017 at 18:57
  • 1
    @le_m: Nah, both objects are going to be discarded, both are sparse, and both have been around since the beginning so will likely be highly optimized.
    – user8897421
    Dec 11, 2017 at 18:58

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