133

In React 16.2, improved support for Fragments has been added. More information can be found on React's blog post here.

We are all familiar with the following code:

render() {
  return (
    // Extraneous div element :(
    <div>
      Some text.
      <h2>A heading</h2>
      More text.
      <h2>Another heading</h2>
      Even more text.
    </div>
  );
}

Yes, we need a container div, but it's not that big of a deal.

In React 16.2, we can do this to avoid the surrounding container div:

render() {
  return (
    <Fragment>
      Some text.
      <h2>A heading</h2>
      More text.
      <h2>Another heading</h2>
      Even more text.
    </Fragment>
  );
}

In either case, we still need need a container element surround the inner elements.

My question is, why is using a Fragment preferable? Does it help with performance? If so, why? Would love some insight.

  • 2
    I find it really useful for flexbox styling when creating first level children for a parent – willwoo Dec 11 '17 at 21:44
  • 26
    The problem with div is that you don't always want a wrapper element. Wrapper elements have a meaning and usually you need additional styles for that meaning to be removed. <Fragment> is just syntactic sugar that is not rendered. There are situations when creating a wrapper is very difficult, for example in SVG where <div> cannot be used and <group> is not always what you want. – Sulthan Dec 11 '17 at 21:48
261
  1. It’s a tiny bit faster and has less memory usage (no need to create an extra DOM node). This only has a real benefit on very large and/or deep trees, but application performance often suffers from death by a thousand cuts. This is one cut less.
  2. Some CSS mechanisms like Flexbox and CSS Grid have a special parent-child relationship, and adding divs in the middle makes it hard to keep the desired layout while extracting logical components.
  3. The DOM inspector is less cluttered. :-)

You can find the descriptions of some other use cases in this React issue: Add fragment API to allow returning multiple components from render

  • 22
    4. Writing definition lists <dt><dd> get a lot easier. Returning paired elements was awkward before Fragments. – Sonson123 Dec 12 '17 at 7:51
  • Do Fragments work in react-native? I tried to import Fragment from 'react'. But it's undefined in RN. – binchik Dec 13 '17 at 18:17
  • 3
    For number 2, tables have actually been the biggest problem for us. The needed structure of table>tr>td (possibly with thead and similar) made for some awkward React code. – Matsemann Dec 18 '17 at 13:18
  • 2
    @binchik tried import {Fragment} from 'react'? it's a named export. – Soska Dec 18 '17 at 22:42
  • Number 3 is the most important! – Zach Smith Nov 7 '18 at 8:54
20

Adding to all answers above there is one more advantage: code readability, Fragment component supports a syntactic sugar form, <>. Thus the code in your question can be written more easily as:

render() {
  return (
    <>
      Some text.
      <h2>A heading</h2>
      More text.
      <h2>Another heading</h2>
      Even more text.
    </>
  );
}

According to docs,

In React, this desugars to a <React.Fragment/> element, as in the example from the previous section. (Non-React frameworks that use JSX may compile to something different.)

Clutter-free, right ?

Note that you still need to use <Fragment> syntax if you need to provide key to the fragment.

  • This shorter syntax is currently not yet supported in create-react-app. Refer: reactjs.org/docs/fragments.html#short-syntax – codingsplash Aug 13 '18 at 6:18
  • 2
    @codingsplash CRA 2.0 has it now. – Meet Zaveri Oct 23 '18 at 1:35
  • 1
    Can't stand this piece of syntactic sugar, it looks unintentional and conveys little inherent meaning. Much prefer <Fragment> – ESR Nov 6 '18 at 0:43
  • @ESR personally I like it. Think of it this way. The children are wrapped in nothing, just like there is nothing in the <>. Invisible. – user3614030 May 5 at 17:01
6
  • Added features not possible before with JSX
  • Better semantic jsx markup. Wrapper elements are used when needed not because they are forced to.
  • Less overall dom markup (increased render performance and less memory overhead)

It as simple as when you don't need a wrapper element you aren't forced to use one. Having less elements is great but I think the biggest benefit is being able to render elements in jsx that weren't previously possible and adding better semantic meaning to wrapper elements because they are optional now.

This wasn't possible before:

 <select>
    {this.renderOptions()}
 </select>

Glancing at the following in React 15 you can't tell if the wrapper element is needed or not:

<span>
  <h1>Hello</h1>
  {this.getContent()}
</span>
0

As per the reatjs.org docs most important needs of <Fragments> <Fragments/> instead of div's are to avoid breaking HTML semantics. When we use div's instead of <Fragments> <Fragments/> we break the HTML semantics. to know more about html semantics. please click and also there are cases where if you use div's instead of Fragments it will be invalid html for example look at this code.

class Columns extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return (
      <div>
        <td>Hello</td>
        <td>World</td>
      </div>
    );
  }
}
Result in table output of Columns Component  
<table>
      <tr>
        <div>
          <td>Hello</td>
          <td>World</td>
        </div>
      </tr>
 </table>

Fragments solve this problem.

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