2

I have the following dataframe:

'customer_id','transaction_dt','product','price','units'
1,2004-01-02 00:00:00,thing1,25,47
1,2004-01-17 00:00:00,thing2,150,8
2,2004-01-29 00:00:00,thing2,150,25
3,2017-07-15 00:00:00,thing3,55,17
3,2016-05-12 00:00:00,thing3,55,47
4,2012-02-23 00:00:00,thing2,150,22
4,2009-10-10 00:00:00,thing1,25,12
4,2014-04-04 00:00:00,thing2,150,2
5,2008-07-09 00:00:00,thing2,150,43
5,2004-01-30 00:00:00,thing1,25,40
5,2004-01-31 00:00:00,thing1,25,22
5,2004-02-01 00:00:00,thing1,25,2

I have the following process:

start_date_range = pd.date_range('2004-01-01 00:00:00', '12-31-2017 00:00:00', freq='30D')
end_date_range = pd.date_range('2004-01-30 23:59:59', '12-31-2017 23:59:59', freq='30D')

tra = df['transaction_dt'].values[:, None]
idx = np.argmax(end_date_range.values > tra, axis=1)

df['window_start_dt'] = np.take(start_date_range, idx)
df['window_end_dt'] = end_date_range[idx]

However, I need to use np.where to fix an issue with df['window_start_dt'] with the following condition:

If 'transaction_dt' <= 'window_start_dt' then select the previous datetime value in start_date_range.

  • seems like you know how to solve the problem. what's the hang up? what's not clear about the numpy.where documentation? is your question more about accessing previous rows of the dataframe? – Paul H Dec 12 '17 at 4:59
  • thanks, i am close now i think. i'm just not clear on how to use np.where to conditionally replace values in 'window_start_dt' from an array or list like start_date_range – Pylander Dec 12 '17 at 5:04
  • Luckily there's online documentation of numpy where you can look it up. – Daniel F Dec 12 '17 at 6:48
2

I think you can use:

tra = df['transaction_dt'].values[:, None]
idx = np.argmax(end_date_range.values > tra, axis=1)

sdr = start_date_range[idx]
m = df['transaction_dt'] < sdr
#change value by condition with previous
df["window_start_dt"] = np.where(m, start_date_range[idx - 1], sdr)

df['window_end_dt'] = end_date_range[idx]
print (df)
    customer_id transaction_dt product  price  units window_start_dt  \
0             1     2004-01-02  thing1     25     47      2004-01-01   
1             1     2004-01-17  thing2    150      8      2004-01-01   
2             2     2004-01-29  thing2    150     25      2004-01-01   
3             3     2017-07-15  thing3     55     17      2017-06-21   
4             3     2016-05-12  thing3     55     47      2016-04-27   
5             4     2012-02-23  thing2    150     22      2012-02-18   
6             4     2009-10-10  thing1     25     12      2009-10-01   
7             4     2014-04-04  thing2    150      2      2014-03-09   
8             5     2008-07-09  thing2    150     43      2008-07-08   
9             5     2004-01-30  thing1     25     40      2004-01-01   
10            5     2004-01-31  thing1     25     22      2004-01-01   
11            5     2004-02-01  thing1     25      2      2004-01-31  
  • This is great now I see how to set up np.where in the future! There is just one last tweak. The comparison operator on line 5 should just '<' not '<='. Row 10 in the results ends up with a window of 2004-01-01 - 2004-02-29 otherwise for a transaction date of 2004-01-31. I'll accept after the tweak and reference from the other question as well. – Pylander Dec 12 '17 at 17:44
  • I am on phone only, so canniy change output. But = was removed. Thanks for comment. – jezrael Dec 12 '17 at 17:49
0

You can use numpy.where() like :

numpy.where(df['transaction_dt'] <= df['window_start_dt'], *operation when True*, *operation when False*)
0

What about something like this?

# get argmax indices
idx = df.transaction_dt.apply(lambda x: np.argmax(end_date_range > x)).values
# define window_start_dt
df = df.assign(window_start_dt = start_date_range[idx])

# identify exceptions
mask = df.transaction_dt.le(df.window_start_dt)
# replace with shifted start_date_rage
df.loc[mask, "window_start_dt"] = start_date_range[idx - 1][mask]

Output:

    customer_id transaction_dt product  price  units window_start_dt
0             1     2004-01-02  thing1     25     47      2004-01-01
1             1     2004-01-17  thing2    150      8      2004-01-01
2             2     2004-01-29  thing2    150     25      2004-01-01
3             3     2017-07-15  thing3     55     17      2017-06-21
4             3     2016-05-12  thing3     55     47      2016-04-27
5             4     2012-02-23  thing2    150     22      2012-02-18
6             4     2009-10-10  thing1     25     12      2009-10-01
7             4     2014-04-04  thing2    150      2      2014-03-09
8             5     2008-07-09  thing2    150     43      2008-07-08
9             5     2004-01-30  thing1     25     40      2004-01-01
10            5     2004-01-31  thing1     25     22      2004-01-01
11            5     2004-02-01  thing1     25      2      2004-01-31

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