7

I've seen programmers assign events listeners inside loops, using the counter. I believe this is the syntax:

for(var i=0; i < someArray.length; i++){
   someArray[i].onclick = (function(i){/* Some code using i */})(i);
}

Could someone please explain the logic behind this, and this weird syntax, I've never seen this:

(function(i))(i);

Many thanks for your time and patience.

  • 3
    This technically doesn't involve the closure. Although i'm not entirely sure what good it does; that inner function will run immediately, and unless it returns another function, the onclick will be set to something really odd. – cHao Jan 23 '11 at 22:02
  • @cHao since this, immediate anonymous function call, is assign to onlick, it must return a function, so that returned function is a closure with "i" variable in surrounding environment. – jcubic Jan 24 '11 at 1:03
  • @jcubic: If the code is indeed setting a DOM event handler, it must return a function if it's working correctly. There's not enough code here to justify either assumption. – cHao Jan 24 '11 at 1:19
5

This is done because JavaScript only has function scope, not block scope. Hence, every variable you declare in a loop is in the function's scope and every closure you create has access to the very same variable.

So the only way to create a new scope is to call a function and that is what

(function(i){/* Some code using i */}(i))

is doing.

Note that your example misses an important part: The immediate function has to return another function which will be the click handler:

someArray[i].onclick = (function(i){
    return function() {
       /* Some code using i */
    }
}(i));

The immediate function is nothing special. It is somehow inlining function definition and function call. You can replace it by a normal function call:

function getClickHandler(i) {
    return function() {
         /* Some code using i */
    }
}

for(var i=0; i < someArray.length; i++){
   someArray[i].onclick = getClickHandler(i);
}
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  • +1 for the getClickHandler version, which is a better approach IMO. – user113716 Jan 23 '11 at 22:16
7

The (function(i))(i) syntax creates an anonymous function and then immediately executes it.

Usually you'll do this to create a new function every time through the loop, that has its own copy of the variable instead of every event handler sharing the same variable.

So for example:

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    buttons[i].click = function() { doFoo(i); };

Often catches people out, because no matter what button you click on, doFoo(10) is called.

Whereas:

for(int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    buttons[i].click = (function(i){ return function() { doFoo(i); };)(i);

Creates a new instance of the inner function (with its own value of i) for each iteration, and works as expected.

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  • So you insert the function you want to assign to the particular event inside the anonymous function, and the value of the "counter" at that point is kept inside the new functions scope? – Dean Jan 23 '11 at 21:57
  • 1
    @Dean: I've edited some code examples into my answer. Do they help? – Anon. Jan 23 '11 at 21:58
  • 1
    @Dean yes, and it works because arguments are copied when they are passed to functions (for primitives). – David Tang Jan 23 '11 at 21:59
  • @Anon, yes, thanks, it seems very clear. You typed "return" in front of the function you inserted in, if I leave the "return" out it gives me an error. The anonymous function that executes immediately "returns" the function you inserted into it? – Dean Jan 23 '11 at 22:03
  • 1
    @Dean: A function is a first class citizen in JS. So yes, it just returns this inner function. – Felix Kling Jan 23 '11 at 22:06

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