What is the best/easy way to validate an email address in ruby (on the server side)?

You could look whether or not it matches a regexp like the one used in this Rails validator:

validates_format_of :email,:with => /\A[^@\s]+@([^@\s]+\.)+[^@\s]+\z/

But if you use Devise, simply do:

validates_format_of :email,:with => Devise::email_regexp

Source: http://lindsaar.net/2008/4/14/tip-4-detecting-a-valid-email-address

Edit 1:

useful website for tests: http://www.rubular.com/

  • Will this validate 'test.com'? Fails for me. – Artem Kalinchuk Aug 9 '13 at 16:53
  • 1
    Nope its not an email – apneadiving Aug 9 '13 at 21:12
  • I mean it treats it as an email. – Artem Kalinchuk Aug 12 '13 at 11:14
  • @ArtemKalinchuk thanks for your comment! I've updated, actually I now rely on Devise regexp to reamin DRY – apneadiving Aug 16 '13 at 15:28
  • 2
    While I consider the answer as good, I have to mention that ruby != rails. The answer does not provide a solution outside the ActiveRecord validations scope. – Matei Iorgulescu May 6 '16 at 15:32

In Ruby? The same way as in any language.

Send a confirmation email to the address with a link that the recipient has to click before the email address is considered fully validated.

There are any number of reasons why a perfectly formatted address may still be invalid (no actual user at that address, blocked by spam filters, and so on). The only way to know for sure is a successfully completed end-to-end transaction of some description.

  • 2
    +1. A Regexp is a good "trivial rejection" technique, but not a complete solution. Sending a validation email in conjunction with Regexping seems relatively optimal. – EnabrenTane Jan 23 '11 at 22:22

You can use

<%=email_field_tag 'to[]','' ,:placeholder=>"Type an email address",:pattern=>"^([\w+-.%]+@[\w-.]+\.[A-Za-z]{2,4},*[\W]*)+$",:multiple => true%>
  • Wouldn't you want to validate this in the controller or model. If the html does it, you could just send a http command and get around this check. – alex_milhouse Mar 4 '16 at 0:37

I know that this is a old question but I was looking for a simple to way to do this. I came across a email_validator gem this is really simple to set up and use.

as a validator

validates :my_email_attribute, :email => true

Validation outside a model

EmailValidator.valid?('narf@example.com') # boolean

I hope that this help everyone.

Happy Codding

validates :email, presence: true, format: /\w+@\w+\.{1}[a-zA-Z]{2,}/

checks that email field is not blank and that one or more characters are both preceding the '@' and following it

Added specificity, any 1 or more word characters before an the @and any 1 or more word character after and in between specifically 1 . and at least 2 letters after

  • this fails a (valid) email like rob@hs-soft.com – Confused Vorlon Sep 9 '17 at 10:41
  • Yes this is too strict, I would go with: .+@.+\.{1}.{2,} – zarathustra Dec 11 '17 at 3:39

Send a confirmation mail , and I will usualy use this validator ... D.R.Y.

# lib/email_validator.rb
class EmailValidator < ActiveModel::EachValidator

  EmailAddress = begin
    qtext = '[^\\x0d\\x22\\x5c\\x80-\\xff]'
    dtext = '[^\\x0d\\x5b-\\x5d\\x80-\\xff]'
    atom = '[^\\x00-\\x20\\x22\\x28\\x29\\x2c\\x2e\\x3a-' +
      '\\x3c\\x3e\\x40\\x5b-\\x5d\\x7f-\\xff]+'
    quoted_pair = '\\x5c[\\x00-\\x7f]'
    domain_literal = "\\x5b(?:#{dtext}|#{quoted_pair})*\\x5d"
    quoted_string = "\\x22(?:#{qtext}|#{quoted_pair})*\\x22"
    domain_ref = atom
    sub_domain = "(?:#{domain_ref}|#{domain_literal})"
    word = "(?:#{atom}|#{quoted_string})"
    domain = "#{sub_domain}(?:\\x2e#{sub_domain})*"
    local_part = "#{word}(?:\\x2e#{word})*"
    addr_spec = "#{local_part}\\x40#{domain}"
    pattern = /\A#{addr_spec}\z/
  end

  def validate_each(record, attribute, value)
    unless value =~ EmailAddress
      record.errors[attribute] << (options[:message] || "is not valid") 
    end
  end

end

in your model

validates :email , :email => true

or

 validates :email, :presence => true, 
                :length => {:minimum => 3, :maximum => 254},
                :uniqueness => true,
                :email => true
  • this version is for Rails 3 – andrea Jan 23 '11 at 22:27
  • maybe not so easy , but you have to write it once and use everytime you need – andrea Jan 23 '11 at 22:35
  • 3
    Did you copy this from @apneadiving's web link? – Andrew Grimm Jan 24 '11 at 8:01
  • some explanation on what this code does would be helpful. – toobulkeh Dec 2 '13 at 20:56

Since the main answer's blog site was down, here is the snippet of code from that site via nice cacher or gist:

# http://my.rails-royce.org/2010/07/21/email-validation-in-ruby-on-rails-without-regexp/
class EmailValidator < ActiveModel::EachValidator
  # Domain must be present and have two or more parts.
  def validate_each(record, attribute, value)
    address = Mail::Address.new value
    record.errors[attribute] << (options[:message] || 'is invalid') unless (address.address == value && address.domain && address.__send__(:tree).domain.dot_atom_text.elements.size > 1 rescue false)
  end
end

Shortcut Form:

 validates :email, :format => /@/

Normal Form (Regex) :

validates :email, :format => { :with => /\A([^@\s]+)@((?:[-a-z0-9]+\.)+[a-z]{2,})\Z/ }

Source: Validator Class

You can take reference from https://apidock.com/rails/ActiveModel/Validations/HelperMethods/validates_format_of

validates_format_of :email, with: /\A([^@\s]+)@((?:[-a-z0-9]+\.)+[a-z]{2,})\z/i

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