147

I have the below code to find elements with their class name:

// Get the element by their class name
var cur_columns = document.getElementsByClassName('column');

// Now remove them

for (var i = 0; i < cur_columns.length; i++) {

}

I just don't know how to remove them..... do I HAVE to reference the parent or something? What's the best way to handle this?

@Karim79:

Here is the JS:

var col_wrapper = document.getElementById("columns").getElementsByTagName("div");
var len = col_wrapper.length;

alert(len);

for (var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    if (col_wrapper[i].className.toLowerCase() == "column") {
        col_wrapper[i].parentNode.removeChild(col_wrapper[i]);
    }
}

Here is the HTML:

<div class="columns" id="columns">
    <div class="column"><input type="checkbox" name="col_list[]" value="cows">cows</div>
    <div class="column"><input type="checkbox" name="col_list[]" value="cows">cows</div>
    <div class="column"><input type="checkbox" name="col_list[]" value="cows">cows</div>
    <div class="column"><input type="checkbox" name="col_list[]" value="cows">cows</div>
    <div name="columnClear" class="contentClear" id="columnClear"></div>
</div>

Edit: Well ended up just using the jQuery option.

5
  • 4
    Honestly, the best way is to just use jQuery. Don't really understand why anyone would want to do DOM manipulation by hand anymore. – Tyler Eaves Jan 23 '11 at 22:51
  • 7
    I dunno lol.... I just feel I'd feel dirty knowing frameworks & not having any knowledge of being able to actually use vanilla JS. Since I'm not a HUGE JS person, I try & just code with vanilla JS when I use it so I don't forget things lol – Brett Jan 23 '11 at 22:55
  • 21
    Right. Who on earth would want to be a knowledgable and well-rounded developer. Absurd! – user113716 Jan 23 '11 at 22:56
  • 1
    A good approach, of course, but just because you're using jQuery, doesn't mean you have to give up on understanding how it works or what the underlying DOM offers. You could probably fix your car if you wanted (The DOM), but your mechanic is probably more experienced at it (the jQuery team). – Lior Cohen Jan 23 '11 at 22:59
  • 2
    @Lior: Yeah, well my mechanic doesn't need to help me turn the key or roll down my window. ;o) – user113716 Jan 23 '11 at 23:01

17 Answers 17

206

Using jQuery (which you really could be using in this case, I think), you could do this like so:

$('.column').remove();

Otherwise, you're going to need to use the parent of each element to remove it:

element.parentNode.removeChild(element);
2
  • 44
    +0.75 for using jQuery, +0.25 for also giving a non-jQuery solution :p – ThiefMaster Jan 23 '11 at 22:53
  • 26
    +0.01 for using jQuery, +0.99 for also giving a non-jQuery solution :p – Alex Pyzhianov May 15 '20 at 15:29
205

If you prefer not to use JQuery:

function removeElementsByClass(className){
    var elements = document.getElementsByClassName(className);
    while(elements.length > 0){
        elements[0].parentNode.removeChild(elements[0]);
    }
}
7
  • 1
    A surprising amount of non-working solutions out there. This is right on. Thanks! – penguinsource Mar 17 '17 at 16:16
  • 16
    If anyone is wondering why he's removing the first element (index 0) always, it's because when you remove an element, it also shrinks the elements array. – Jefferson Lima Jul 27 '17 at 16:35
  • 2
    @ofir_aghai as @JeffersonLima points the getElementsByClassName is a live collection. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/NodeList – Veikko Karsikko Aug 7 '17 at 7:21
  • 1
    JQuery is huge lib lot of dependencies that not necessarily used +1 for not using jquery. – ßiansor Å. Ålmerol Jan 14 '18 at 16:26
  • 3
    Nice observation about the fact that elements array shrinks – ferralucho Feb 27 '18 at 14:04
38

Using ES6 you could do like:

const removeElements = (elms) => elms.forEach(el => el.remove());

// Use like:
removeElements( document.querySelectorAll(".remove") );
<p class="remove">REMOVE ME</p>
<p>KEEP ME</p>
<p class="remove">REMOVE ME</p>

2
  • To take further advantage of ES6, how about: var removeElements = (elms) => [...elms].forEach(el => el.remove()); – Calculuswhiz Dec 8 '17 at 4:44
  • 1
    Best Answer Thanks ! – Francesco May 24 '18 at 12:05
33

In pure vanilla Javascript, without jQuery or ES6, you could do:

const elements = document.getElementsByClassName("my-class");

while (elements.length > 0) elements[0].remove();
4
  • 2
    Clearest answer without jQuery and ES6 – Eric Jan 2 '18 at 12:39
  • 2
    Maybe your answer came later - should be the accepted one because it's undependent of jQuery. In general it is better to use vanilla-js, isn't it? – Luckyfella Mar 3 '20 at 10:24
  • Best answer without the unnecessary and bloady jQuery. Say NO to jQuery. Yes to vanilla ice ! – Thanasis Jun 18 '20 at 18:58
  • This one work on WordPress using Elementor page builder and adding a HTML element to add JavaScript without having to pay for the Pro version – Maduro Oct 4 '20 at 1:25
16

One line

document.querySelectorAll(".remove").forEach(el => el.remove());

For example you can do in this page to remove userinfo

document.querySelectorAll(".user-info").forEach(el => el.remove());
1
15

This works for me

while (document.getElementsByClassName('my-class')[0]) {
        document.getElementsByClassName('my-class')[0].remove();
    }
0
10

Brett - are you aware that getElementyByClassName support from IE 5.5 to 8 is not there according to quirksmode?. You would be better off following this pattern if you care about cross-browser compatibility:

  • Get container element by ID.
  • Get needed child elements by tag name.
  • Iterate over children, test for matching className property.
  • elements[i].parentNode.removeChild(elements[i]) like the other guys said.

Quick example:

var cells = document.getElementById("myTable").getElementsByTagName("td");
var len = cells.length;
for(var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    if(cells[i].className.toLowerCase() == "column") {
        cells[i].parentNode.removeChild(cells[i]);
    }
}

Here's a quick demo.

EDIT: Here is the fixed version, specific to your markup:

var col_wrapper = document.getElementById("columns").getElementsByTagName("div");

var elementsToRemove = [];
for (var i = 0; i < col_wrapper.length; i++) {
    if (col_wrapper[i].className.toLowerCase() == "column") {
        elementsToRemove.push(col_wrapper[i]);
    }
}
for(var i = 0; i < elementsToRemove.length; i++) {
    elementsToRemove[i].parentNode.removeChild(elementsToRemove[i]);
}

The problem was my fault; when you remove an element from the resulting array of elements, the length changes, so one element gets skipped at each iteration. The solution is to store a reference to each element in a temporary array, then subsequently loop over those, removing each one from the DOM.

Try it here.

5
  • Thanks for that - though it's not a huge issue as it's for an admin section so really one person will be using it.... but will still take your comments into consideration. – Brett Jan 23 '11 at 23:12
  • @Brett - do it anyway! It'll take a few minutes of your time and you'll get extra high-fives at the office :) – karim79 Jan 23 '11 at 23:13
  • Ok I tried this... it reported the correct amount of elements when I did an alert, but it only removed two of the four with that class name & I got this error: col_wrapper[i] is undefined. I will update my post with the code I used. – Brett Jan 24 '11 at 12:36
  • @Brett - if you're interested, I fixed your updated code, and commented on the problem. – karim79 Jan 24 '11 at 14:22
  • Man, this helped me out more than you could imagine with an issue I've been stumped over the past two hours. THANK YOU! – Zoolander Jan 20 '12 at 20:13
4

I prefer using forEach over for/while looping. In order to use it's necessary to convert HTMLCollection to Array first:

Array.from(document.getElementsByClassName("post-text"))
    .forEach(element => element.remove());

Pay attention, it's not necessary the most efficient way. Just much more elegant for me.

1

Yes, you have to remove from the parent:

cur_columns[i].parentNode.removeChild(cur_columns[i]);
1

In case you want to remove elements which are added dynamically try this:

document.body.addEventListener('DOMSubtreeModified', function(event) {
    const elements = document.getElementsByClassName('your-class-name');
    while (elements.length > 0) elements[0].remove();
});
1

Recursive function might solve your problem like below

removeAllByClassName = function (className) {
    function findToRemove() {
        var sets = document.getElementsByClassName(className);
        if (sets.length > 0) {
            sets[0].remove();
            findToRemove();
        }
    }
    findToRemove();
};
//
removeAllByClassName();
1
  • 1
    Haha avoided a loop. <3 – Ivan Ivković Jul 19 '19 at 11:55
1

It's very simple, one-liner, using ES6 spread operator due document.getElementByClassName returns a HTML collection.

[...document.getElementsByClassName('dz-preview')].map(thumb => thumb.remove());
1

This is how I've completed a similar task in Pure JavaScript.

function setup(item){
   document.querySelectorAll(".column") /* find all classes named column */
  .forEach((item) => { item /* loop  through each item */
      .addEventListener("click", (event) => { item
        /* add event listener for each item found */
          .remove(); /* remove self - changed node as needed */
      });
  });
  }

  setup();
<div class="columns" id="columns">
    <div class="column"><input type="checkbox" name="col_list[]" value="cows">cows1</div>
    <div class="column"><input type="checkbox" name="col_list[]" value="cows">cows2</div>
    <div class="column"><input type="checkbox" name="col_list[]" value="cows">cows3</div>
    <div class="column"><input type="checkbox" name="col_list[]" value="cows">cows4</div>
    <div name="columnClear" class="contentClear" id="columnClear"></div>
</div>

0

You can use this syntax: node.parentNode

For example:

someNode = document.getElementById("someId");
someNode.parentNode.removeChild(someNode);
1
  • 3
    This question asked to remove by className – JoeTidee Jul 23 '17 at 12:18
0
const elem= document.getElementsByClassName('column')

for (let i = elem.length; 0 < i ; )
    elem[--i].remove();

OR

const elem= document.getElementsByClassName('column')

while (elem.length > 0 )
    elem[0].remove();

-1

The skipping elements bug in this (code from above)

var len = cells.length;
for(var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    if(cells[i].className.toLowerCase() == "column") {
        cells[i].parentNode.removeChild(cells[i]);
    }
}

can be fixed by just running the loop backwards as follows (so that the temporary array is not needed)

var len = cells.length;
for(var i = len-1; i >-1; i--) {
    if(cells[i].className.toLowerCase() == "column") {
        cells[i].parentNode.removeChild(cells[i]);
   }
}
2
  • This is a bit complicated. Why not use a while cycle instead? (see my answer) – tocqueville Oct 2 '16 at 13:49
  • @tocqueville The posted question used a for loop. I was merely pointing out how to fix the bug with minimal changes to his code. – shao.lo Aug 29 '17 at 0:08
-3

You can you use a simple solution, just change the class, the HTML Collection filter is updated:

var cur_columns = document.getElementsByClassName('column');

for (i in cur_columns) {
   cur_columns[i].className = '';
}

Ref: http://www.w3.org/TR/2011/WD-html5-author-20110705/common-dom-interfaces.html

1
  • 1
    This will not work since the array of the loop is modified inside the loop itself. The result is that the last element will be skipped. – tocqueville Oct 2 '16 at 13:48

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