8

I have a list of transactions/tuples in Python with varying number or elements, like this:

lst = [('apple','banana','carrots'),('apple',),('banana','carrots',)]

I would like to store this list in a tabular form (preferably in a pd.DataFrame) such as this:

   apple  banana  carrots
0      1       1        1
1      1       0        0
2      0       1        1

But if try to convert directly using pd.DataFrame, I get his instead:

pd.DataFrame(lst)
        0        1        2
0   apple   banana  carrots
1   apple     None     None
2  banana  carrots     None

How can I convert this type of list into a binary table?

7 Answers 7

10

This is very simple if you use value_counts over columns i.e

pd.DataFrame(lst).apply(pd.value_counts,1).fillna(0)

    apple  banana  carrots
0    1.0     1.0      1.0
1    1.0     0.0      0.0
2    0.0     1.0      1.0
4
  • value_counts seems like 'belong' to you :-)
    – BENY
    Dec 13, 2017 at 2:56
  • Haha maybe, felt like using it Dec 13, 2017 at 2:57
  • Hi @Dark. Thank you for your solution. It seems simple, but it is taking too long to run. My list actually has more than 4 million elements. And for some reason Robbie's solution is running much faster. Could you help me understand why? Thanks
    – AdrianoAA
    Dec 13, 2017 at 6:21
  • @AdrianoArantes thats the draw back of apply, do see coldspeed's answer, I dont think that speed can be beaten. Dec 13, 2017 at 10:00
7

Let's try get_dummies + groupby + sum -

pd.get_dummies(pd.DataFrame(lst)).groupby(by=lambda x: x.split('_')[1], axis=1).sum()

   apple  banana  carrots
0      1       1        1
1      1       0        0
2      0       1        1

This should be pretty fast.

4
  • 1
    Not just pretty fast, but super dooper fast Dec 13, 2017 at 9:59
  • Really fast indeed! It took me 50s to process a list of 4.5 million elements! Thank you COLDSPEED !!
    – AdrianoAA
    Dec 14, 2017 at 3:35
  • @AdrianoArantes you’re welcome! How long was the previous accepted answer taking?
    – cs95
    Dec 14, 2017 at 3:36
  • @cᴏʟᴅsᴘᴇᴇᴅ, Robbie solution was taking 1 min and 30 sec
    – AdrianoAA
    Dec 14, 2017 at 3:40
7

The following method:

  1. Define lst

  2. Find all unique strings in lst

  3. Count occurrences in each tuple within the list

  4. Create dataframe

Is implemented here:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

lst = [('apple','banana','carrots'),('apple',),('banana','carrots',)]
cols = np.unique(sum(tuple(lst),()))
data = [[i.count(j) for j in cols] for i in lst]
df = pd.DataFrame(columns=cols, data=data)

Output:

   apple  banana  carrots
0      1       1        1
1      1       0        0
2      0       1        1
4
  • this wont be binary if a single element occurs more than once in a row
    – Nate
    Dec 13, 2017 at 1:13
  • @Nate yes that's true, though it will be binary if the input is in the same format as in the question.
    – Robbie
    Dec 13, 2017 at 1:14
  • Thanks @Robbie, your solution worked well in my case, and yes, for my problems each element appears only once per row.
    – AdrianoAA
    Dec 13, 2017 at 1:28
  • @AdrianoArantes counting is nothing but value_counts in pandas, what do you think about my solution. Dec 13, 2017 at 2:37
3

Just stack and get_dummies

pd.DataFrame(lst).stack().str.get_dummies().sum(level=0)
Out[114]: 
   apple  banana  carrots
0      1       1        1
1      1       0        0
2      0       1        1
2
  • Check out my answer when you can!
    – cs95
    Dec 13, 2017 at 9:12
  • 1
    @cᴏʟᴅsᴘᴇᴇᴅ nice usage of groupby !!
    – BENY
    Dec 13, 2017 at 13:49
0

You can try this:

import itertools
class Table:
   def __init__(self, data):
      self.lst = data
      self.headers = headers = list(set(itertools.chain(*self.lst)))
      self.new_count = {i:[b.count(i) for b in self.lst] for i in self.headers}
   def __getitem__(self, row):
       if isinstance(row, int):
           return [d[row] for c, d in sorted(self.new_count.items(), key=lambda x:x[0])]
       return self.new_count[row]
   def __repr__(self):
       return ' '.join(sorted(self.new_count.keys()))+'\n'+'\n'.join('{}. {}'.format(i, ' '.join(map(str, d))) for i, d in enumerate(zip(*[e[-1] for e in sorted(self.new_count.items(), key=lambda x:x[0])])))

lst = [('apple','banana','carrots'),('apple',),('banana','carrots',)]
t = Table(lst)
print(t)

Output:

apple banana carrots
0. 1 1 1
1. 1 0 0
2. 0 1 1
0

Create a temporary list with items converted to binary, then use Dataframe Write a loop that converts each item into binary.

def pad_collection(collection, pad_value):
    sorted_collection = sorted(collection, key=lambda tup: len(tup))
    max_length = len(sorted_collection[-1])
    for item in collection:
        for i in range (max_length - len(item)):
            item.append(pad_value)
    return collection

def convert_to_binary(collection):
    result = []
    padded_collection = pad_collection(collection)
    for i in padded_collection:
        temp = []
        for element in i:
            new_element = int(bool(element))
            temp.append(new_element)
        result.append(tuple(temp))
    return padded_collection
0

You can try in pure logic without importing any external module ,

lst = [('apple','banana','carrots'),('apple',),('banana','carrots',)]

track_uniqu=[]
for i in lst:
    for k in i:

        if k not in track_uniqu:
            track_uniqu.append(k)

final={}
for i,j in enumerate(lst):

    dummy=[0]*len(track_uniqu)

    for k in j:
        if k in track_uniqu:

            dummy[track_uniqu.index(k)]=1
            final[i]=dummy
        else:
            pass
print(final)

output:

{0: [1, 1, 1], 1: [1, 0, 0], 2: [0, 1, 1]}

Result is in dict format but you can create tabular data from this dict as you want.

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