6

I am trying to migrate an Oracle merge query to PostgreSql. As described in this article, Postgres UPSERT syntax supports a "where clause" to identify conditions of conflict.

Unfortunately, that webpage does not provide an example with the "where clause". I tried searching for it elsewhere but could not find it. Hence this question.

Following the same example in the above given webpage, here is an example setup:

CREATE TABLE customers (
    customer_id serial PRIMARY KEY,
    name VARCHAR UNIQUE,
    email VARCHAR NOT NULL,
    active bool NOT NULL DEFAULT TRUE
);

INSERT INTO customers (NAME, email) VALUES
 ('IBM', 'contact@ibm.com'),
 ('Microsoft', 'contact@microsoft.com'),
 ('Intel','contact@intel.com');


SELECT * FROM customers;
 customer_id |   name    |         email         | active
-------------+-----------+-----------------------+--------
           1 | IBM       | contact@ibm.com       | t
           2 | Microsoft | contact@microsoft.com | t
           3 | Intel     | contact@intel.com     | t
(3 rows)

I want my UPSERT statement to look something like this:

INSERT INTO customers (NAME, email)
VALUES
('Microsoft', 'hotline@microsoft.com') 
ON CONFLICT where (name = 'Microsoft' and active = TRUE)
DO UPDATE SET email = 'hotline@microsoft.com';

The example is a bit contrived but I hope I have been able to communicate the gist here.

1 Answer 1

11

You need a partial index. Drop uniqe constraint on the column name and create a partial index on the column:

CREATE TABLE customers (
    customer_id serial PRIMARY KEY,
    name VARCHAR,
    email VARCHAR NOT NULL,
    active bool NOT NULL DEFAULT TRUE
);

CREATE UNIQUE INDEX ON customers (name) WHERE active;

INSERT INTO customers (NAME, email) VALUES
 ('IBM', 'contact@ibm.com'),
 ('Microsoft', 'contact@microsoft.com'),
 ('Intel','contact@intel.com');

The query should look like this:

INSERT INTO customers (name, email)
VALUES
    ('Microsoft', 'hotline@microsoft.com') 
ON CONFLICT (name) WHERE active
DO UPDATE SET email = excluded.email;

SELECT *
FROM customers;

 customer_id |   name    |         email         | active 
-------------+-----------+-----------------------+--------
           1 | IBM       | contact@ibm.com       | t
           3 | Intel     | contact@intel.com     | t
           2 | Microsoft | hotline@microsoft.com | t
(3 rows)    

Note the proper use of the special record excluded. Per the documentation:

The SET and WHERE clauses in ON CONFLICT DO UPDATE have access to the existing row using the table's name (or an alias), and to rows proposed for insertion using the special excluded table.

3
  • As an alternative which might be clearer, you can create a named unique constraint, and use ON CONFLICT ON CONSTRAINT my_constraint_name. As I understand it, the (name) WHERE active clause is only there to deduce which constraint to use, and may end up less readable than a well-chosen constraint name if the constraint definition is complex.
    – IMSoP
    Dec 13, 2017 at 9:46
  • @IMSoP - you cannot create a constraint on a partial unique index. On the other hand using a column name in on conflict is quite clear.
    – klin
    Dec 13, 2017 at 9:57
  • Ah, fair point, I hadn't realised that. My thought on clarity was that a constraint name can describe the intent, rather than enumerating the mechanics, which in some circumstances would make the query a bit more readable. But it seems there is no choice in this case anyway.
    – IMSoP
    Dec 13, 2017 at 10:58

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