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New in Visual Studio 2017 is the ability to generate a NuGet package on build for some target types (namely, .NET Standard 2.0 which is what I'm using).

This works great, and the .nupkg file is generated on successful build.

However, I'm not able to figure out how to get the built package automatically published to our local repository.

I already tried a post-build event of:

nuget push -Source https://my.nuget.server/nuget/ "C:\Source\MyProject\bin\Release\MyProject.1.0.0.nupkg"

But this presents 2 problems:

  1. The name of the package includes the version number and this isn't available as a post-build event variable, so I can't say, for example, nuget push $(NugetPackage). I also can't figure out a combination of macros/variables that would get me the package name effectively.
  2. The automatic NuGet packaging process occurs after the post-build event, so at the time of post-build, the package has not even been generated yet!

Microsoft has provided this kick-ass automatic NuGet packaging, but no way to push it to a local repository (or so it seems)!

Has anyone gotten this to work? Am I missing something? Is there a workaround? Is this something being worked on?

2 Answers 2

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You can automate a publish to nuget by adding the below line to your libraries csproj directly. You will need to either set an environment variable to the location of your nuget.exe, add the location to your system's PATH, or hard enter it into the Command parameter.

Personally, I prefer to download the latest version of nuget.exe and place it into the user's %userprofile%\.nuget folder. This is where nuget stores the local cache of packages, so it should be already created.

Example of publishing to a remote repository.

<Target Name="PostPackNugetDeploy" AfterTargets="Pack" Condition="'$(Configuration)' == 'Release'">
  <Exec Command="="%userprofile%\.nuget\nuget.exe push &quot;$(OutputPath)$(PackageId).$(PackageVersion).nupkg&quot; -Source &quot;$(NuGetSourceRelease)&quot; -Verbosity Detailed" />
</Target>

Example of publishing to a local repository.

<Target Name="PostPackNugetDeploy" AfterTargets="Pack" Condition="'$(Configuration)' == 'Release'">
 <Exec Command="%userprofile%\.nuget\nuget.exe add &quot;$(OutputPath)$(PackageId).$(PackageVersion).nupkg&quot; -source \\Server\Packages" />
</Target>

You can find the docs on the MSBuild targets for nuget here https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/nuget/reference/msbuild-targets

Update

I have wrapped this into a nuget package that can be referenced within your project. It takes care of all this, all you have to do is add a property to your project.

You can fine the code and full guide here.
https://github.com/SimplerSoftware/SS.NuGet.Publish

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  • Worked for me, but I used a "copy" command instead of the "exec" command: <Copy SourceFiles="$(OutputPath)..\$(PackageId).$(PackageVersion).nupkg" DestinationFolder="\\networkshare\folder" />
    – birwin
    Oct 17, 2018 at 15:24
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    That doesn't publish it, it copies the file. If you publish it, it will create folder structure for versioning.
    – John C
    Oct 17, 2018 at 15:26
  • Thanks for the tip. I am new to nuget, so I will try the "add" command to compare.
    – birwin
    Oct 17, 2018 at 16:10
  • John is right. After changing it to exec nuget, a folder representing the version, an sha file and a nuspec file all appeared in the Nuget Feed Repository.
    – birwin
    Oct 17, 2018 at 20:58
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This feature has been requested here: Enable push from VS.

NuGet publish is generally handled using build/deployment automation software like TFS, VSTS, Jenkins, etc.

1
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    Thanks - I added a comment to that feature request to track it. Seems like there are some other folks that need this as well - not everyone has a fully-featured ALM set up, some of us like to publish right from VS because it's quick and frictionless. :)
    – qJake
    Jan 2, 2018 at 15:09

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