2

Is there a way to format(in a shell command chain) the following output of du -s -k *

287720  crm-cc
21500   crm-mvh
40360   elasticsearch-5.1.2
293292  electron-quick-start
44636   hexagon
193572  jpk
132 knights
209860  pink-panther
1722104 popc
4   server-config.txt
45392   sigb-backend
47468   test
58904   um-report
164156  zeus

In the following way:

1,763,434,496 popc
  300,331,008 electron-quick-start
  294,625,280 crm-cc
  214,896,640 pink-panther
  198,217,728 jpk
  168,095,744 zeus
   60,317,696 um-report
   48,607,232 test
   46,481,408 sigb-backend
   45,707,264 hexagon
   41,328,640 elasticsearch-5.1.2
   22,016,000 crm-mvh
      135,168 knights
        4,096 server-config.txt

By that I mean:

  • Sort the files/directories by their size in descending order.
  • Insert a thousands separator every three characters counting from the right.
  • Insert leading spaces to align the size to the right

I have implemented this in PHP but I was hoping for a more universal solution(not every linux-based OS has the PHP interpreter installed).

If it's relevant, I'm using zsh most of the time, so the solution can be limited to this shell.

2 Answers 2

5

As an example, let's consider a directory with these files:

$ du -sk *
12488   big.log
200     big.pdf
4       f1
2441412 output.txt
160660  program.zip
4       smallfile
4       some.txt

To reformat du as you desire:

$ du -sk * | sort -rn | sed -E ':a; s/([[:digit:]]+)([[:digit:]]{3})/\1,\2/; ta' | awk -F'\t' '{printf "%10s %s\n",$1,substr($0,length($1)+2)}'
 2,441,412 output.txt
   160,660 program.zip
    12,488 big.log
       200 big.pdf
         4 some.txt
         4 smallfile
         4 f1

Note: This approach will work even with file names that contain whitespace.

Shell function for convenience

Since the above is a lot to type, let's create a shell function:

$ dusk() { du -sk "$@" | sort -rn | sed -E ':a; s/([[:digit:]]+)([[:digit:]]{3})/\1,\2/; ta' | awk -F'\t' '{printf "%10s %s\n",$1,substr($0,length($1)+2)}';}

We can use the shell function as follows:

$ dusk *
 2,441,412 output.txt
   160,660 program.zip
    12,488 big.log
       200 big.pdf
         4 some.txt
         4 smallfile
         4 f1

How it works

  • du -sk *

    This is our du command.

  • sort -rn

    This does a numerical sort in reverse order so that largest files come first.

  • sed -E ':a; s/([[:digit:]]+)([[:digit:]]{3})/\1,\2/; ta'

    This puts commas where we want them.

  • awk -F'\t' '{printf "%10s %s\n",$1,substr($0,length($1)+2)}';}

    This right-justifies the numbers.

Multiline version

For those who prefer their commands spread out over multiple lines:

du -sk * |
    sort -rn |
    sed -E ':a; s/([[:digit:]]+)([[:digit:]]{3})/\1,\2/; ta' |
    awk -F'\t' '{printf "%10s %s\n",$1,substr($0,length($1)+2)}'

Compatibility with Mac OSX/BSD

Try this and see if it works on OSX:

$ echo 1234567890 | sed -E -e :a -e 's/([[:digit:]]+)([[:digit:]]{3})/\1,\2/' -e ta 
1,234,567,890

If that works, then let's revise the complete command to be:

du -sk * | sort -rn | sed -E -e :a -e 's/([[:digit:]]+)([[:digit:]]{3})/\1,\2/' -e ta  | awk -F'\t' '{printf "%10s %s\n",$1,substr($0,length($1)+2)}'
2
  • Thank you. This works fine in Debian or Ubuntu but in Mac it doesn't seem to separate the thousands. Is there a simple way to accommodate the GNU sed command arguments to BSD sed? Commented Dec 14, 2017 at 15:29
  • @KubaSzymanowski Sorry about that! I've added to the end of the answer what I think should be a OSX/BSD compatible version. Please give it a try and let me know.
    – John1024
    Commented Dec 14, 2017 at 21:18
4

Using sort and GNU awk you could (your output in file):

$ sort -nr file | awk '{printf "%'\''d %s\n",$1,$2}'
1,722,104 popc
293,292 electron-quick-start
287,720 crm-cc
...

If you want to right align the first field, you need to provide the printf with a width for the first field, for example:

$ sort -nr file | awk '{printf "%'\''9d %s\n",$1,$2}'
1,722,104 popc
  293,292 electron-quick-start
  287,720 crm-cc

9 is the length of $1 with the commas which you could probably calculate with: length($1)+(length($1)-1)/3 for the longest $1which is the first, so:

$ sort -nr file | 
  awk 'NR==1 { len=length($1) + (length($1)-1)/3 }
  { printf "%'\''" len "d %s\n",$1,$2 }'
1,722,104 popc
  293,292 electron-quick-start
  287,720 crm-cc
1
  • Updated. Fixed a typo and added code to calculate the length of the first size. Commented Dec 14, 2017 at 6:49

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