63

I want to create a file using C++, but I have no idea how to do it. For example I want to create a text file named Hello.txt.

Can anyone help me?

103

One way to do this is to create an instance of the ofstream class, and use it to write to your file. Here's a link to a website that has some example code, and some more information about the standard tools available with most implementations of C++:

ofstream reference

For completeness, here's some example code:

// using ofstream constructors.
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>  

std::ofstream outfile ("test.txt");

outfile << "my text here!" << std::endl;

outfile.close();

You want to use std::endl to end your lines. An alternative is using '\n' character. These two things are different, std::endl flushes the buffer and writes your output immediately while '\n' allows the outfile to put all of your output into a buffer and maybe write it later.

  • 4
    Not to mention that std::endl also writes the correct platform specific newline character string. – Grant Limberg Jan 25 '09 at 19:27
  • 4
    To Limberg: thats wrong. "endl: Effects: Calls os.put(os.widen('\n')), then os.flush()" -- C++ standard, 27.6.2.7/1 – Iraimbilanja Jan 25 '09 at 20:26
  • 7
    @Grant Limberg: '\n' also writes the correct platform specific newline--it's translated as appropriate by the ostream internals. – Drew Hall Jan 25 '09 at 20:27
  • 2
    @James Thompson: The only reason to use std::endl is if you really need to guarantee that the buffer is flushed to the file IMMEDIATELY. Otherwise, it's a needless pessimization (file i/o is very expensive!). – Drew Hall Jan 25 '09 at 20:28
  • 2
    When using ofstream for writing to a file, then no file locking is implemented. It is possible for others to read the half-written file, or for others to open another ofstream and write simultaneously. – Rolf Kristensen Jun 23 '10 at 10:07
18

Do this with a file stream. When a std::ofstream is closed, the file is created. I personally like the following code, because the OP only asks to create a file, not to write in it:

#include <fstream>

int main()
{
    std::ofstream file { "Hello.txt" };
    // Hello.txt has been created here
}

The temporary variable file is destroyed right after its creation, so the stream is closed and thus the file is created.

  • It is THE right answer for, question is just: "how to create file with C++". – George Theodosiou May 18 '18 at 14:42
  • @GeorgeTheodosiou I know, but I cannot write this as in in my answer... Thank you anyway for your edit proposal. – French Boiethios May 18 '18 at 14:44
12
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

int main() {
  std::ofstream o("Hello.txt");

  o << "Hello, World\n" << std::endl;

  return 0;
}
  • 12
    The \n in the string is redundant when using std::endl. – Greg Hewgill Jan 25 '09 at 19:20
  • The return 0; in the function is redundant when using "int main()" – Iraimbilanja Jan 25 '09 at 19:21
  • 3
    endl does more than flush: it outputs a newline too. So either print \n then std::flush, or just use std::endl. – Iraimbilanja Jan 25 '09 at 19:22
  • 4
    streams get flushed on destruction, so the std::endl is completely superfluous in this case. However, the "return 0" is definitely NOT redundant. It was a common case in C to imply "return 0", but that is not true with C++. – Tom Jan 25 '09 at 19:53
  • 1
    @Tom: basic.start.main: "If control reaches the end of main without encountering a return statement, the effect is that of executing: return 0;". – cic Jan 25 '09 at 20:10
4

Here is my solution:

#include <fstream>

int main()
{
    std::ofstream ("Hello.txt");
    return 0;
}

File (Hello.txt) is created even without ofstream name, and this is the difference from Mr. Boiethios answer.

  • Ladies, Gentlemen, please let me say you that when someone asks what to do for get some result, and reads an answer, thinks that EVERYTHING in answer IS NEEDED for get this result. For this, answer should include only WHAT IS NEEDED for get the desired result. Regards. – George Theodosiou Sep 29 '18 at 8:30
  • caveat: if the raw "Hello.txt" was replaced by an already existing variable, this wouldn't compile for MSVC17. – kayleeFrye_onDeck Jan 31 at 0:29
3
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

string filename = "/tmp/filename.txt";

int main() {
  std::ofstream o(filename.c_str());

  o << "Hello, World\n" << std::endl;

  return 0;
}

This is what I had to do in order to use a variable for the filename instead of a regular string.

-1
/*I am working with turbo c++ compiler so namespace std is not used by me.Also i am familiar with turbo.*/

#include<iostream.h>
#include<iomanip.h>
#include<conio.h>
#include<fstream.h> //required while dealing with files
void main ()
{
clrscr();
ofstream fout; //object created **fout**
fout.open("your desired file name + extension");
fout<<"contents to be written inside the file"<<endl;
fout.close();
getch();
} 

After running the program the file will be created inside the bin folder in your compiler folder itself.

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