Assume we have given an API function f(Stream s) to put binary data contained in a stream into a database. I want to put a file into the database using f but I want to compress the data in advance. Hence I thought I could do the following:

var fileStream= File.OpenRead(path);
using(var dstream = new DeflateStream(fileStream, CompressionLevel.Optimal))
   f(dstream);

But it seems DeflateStream only writes into the stream fileStream but does not read from it when compressing. In all examples I found, the CopyTo method of the stream was used to compress or decompress. But this would mean that I have to keep a copy of the compressed data in memory before passing it to f for instance like this:

var memoryStream = new MemoryStream();
using(var fileStream= File.OpenRead(path)) 
  using(var dstream = new DeflateStream(memoryStream, CompressionLevel.Optimal)) {
    fileStream.CopyTo(dstream);
    memoryStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
    f(memoryStream);
  }    

Is there any way to avoid using the MemoryStream?

Update For the sake of the persistency of some commentators I add a complete example:

using System;
using System.IO;
using System.IO.Compression;

public class ThisWouldBeTheDatabaseClient {
  public void f(Stream s) {
    // some implementation I don't have access to
    // The only thing I know is that it reads data from the stream in some way.
    var buffer = new byte[10];
    s.Read(buffer,0,10);
  }
}

public class Program {
  public static void Main() {
    var dummyDatabaseClient = new ThisWouldBeTheDatabaseClient();
    var dataBuffer = new byte[1000];
    var fileStream= new MemoryStream( dataBuffer ); // would be "File.OpenRead(path)" in real case
    using(var dstream = new DeflateStream(fileStream, CompressionLevel.Optimal))
        dummyDatabaseClient.f(dstream);
  }
}

The read operation in the dummy implementation of f throws an exception: InvalidOperationException: Reading from the compression stream is not supported. Concluding the discussion in the comments, I assume that the desired behaviour is not possible with DeflateStream but there are alternatives in third party libraries.

  • The code you've provided wouldn't compile - there are missing brackets and braces in various places. Please provide a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example. – Jon Skeet Dec 14 '17 at 8:51
  • 1
    (I'd also very strongly advise you do use braces even for single-statement if/using/etc statements.) – Jon Skeet Dec 14 '17 at 8:53
  • Note that these edits still aren't creating a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example. We can't copy, paste, compile, run and see the problem. – Jon Skeet Dec 14 '17 at 8:55
  • @JonSkeet I think you are too harsh to this question. It looks quite clear, and it cannot contain minimal example because it's not about code that works incorrectly, but instead about how to write code in a way to achieve specified goal (avoid buffering into additional MemoryStream). – Evk Dec 14 '17 at 9:00
  • 1
    The DeflateStream represents the uncompressed stream data and the wrapped stream the compressed stream data. - Yes, you will always need another stream for compression (here the MemoryStream). If you worry about memory consumption use a FileStream with a temporary file – Sir Rufo Dec 14 '17 at 9:05
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use SharpCompress for this. Its DeflateStream allows you to read the compressed data on the fly, which is exactly what you want.

Here's a complete example based on Sir Rufo's:

using System;
using System.IO;
using SharpCompress.Compressors;
using SharpCompress.Compressors.Deflate;
using System.Linq;

public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        var dataBuffer = Enumerable.Range(1, 50000).Select(e => (byte)(e % 256)).ToArray();

        using (var dataStream = new MemoryStream(dataBuffer))
        {
            // Note: this refers to SharpCompress.Compressors.Deflate.DeflateStream                
            using (var deflateStream = new DeflateStream(dataStream, CompressionMode.Compress))
            {
                ConsumeStream(deflateStream);
            }
        }
    }

    public static void ConsumeStream(Stream stream)
    {
        // Let's just prove we can reinflate to the original data...
        byte[] data;
        using (var decompressed = new MemoryStream())
        {
            using (var decompressor = new DeflateStream(stream, CompressionMode.Decompress))
            {
                decompressor.CopyTo(decompressed);
            }
            data = decompressed.ToArray();
        }
        Console.WriteLine("Reinflated size: " + data.Length);
        int errors = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++)
        {
            if (data[i] != (i + 1) % 256)
            {
                errors++;
            }
        }
        Console.WriteLine("Total errors: " + errors);
    }
}

Or using your sample code:

using System;
using System.IO;
using SharpCompress.Compressors;
using SharpCompress.Compressors.Deflate;

public class ThisWouldBeTheDatabaseClient {
  public void f(Stream s) {
    // some implementation I don't have access to
    // The only thing I know is that it reads data from the stream in some way.
    var buffer = new byte[10];
    s.Read(buffer,0,10);
  }
}

public class Program {
  public static void Main() {
    var dummyDatabaseClient = new ThisWouldBeTheDatabaseClient();
    var dataBuffer = new byte[1000];
    var fileStream= new MemoryStream( dataBuffer ); // would be "File.OpenRead(path)" in real case
    using(var dstream = new DeflateStream(
        fileStream, CompressionMode.Compress, CompressionLevel.BestCompression))
        dummyDatabaseClient.f(dstream);
  }
}

This now doesn't throw an exception, and will serve the compressed data.

  • I just checked for any memory related benefits with my solution and I did not find any :o) – Sir Rufo Dec 14 '17 at 13:06

The DeflateStream is just a wrapper and needs a stream for the compressed data. So you have to use two streams.

Is there any way to avoid using the MemoryStream?

Yes.

You need a stream to store temporary data without consuming (too much) memory. Instead using MemoryStream you can use a temporary file for that.

For the lazy people (like me in first place) let's create a class that will behave mostly like a MemoryStream

public class TempFileStream : FileStream
{
    public TempFileStream() : base(
        path: Path.GetTempFileName(),
        mode: FileMode.Open,
        access: FileAccess.ReadWrite,
        share: FileShare.None,
        bufferSize: 4096,
        options: FileOptions.DeleteOnClose | FileOptions.Asynchronous | FileOptions.Encrypted | FileOptions.RandomAccess)
    {
    }
}

The important part here is FileOptions.DeleteOnClose which will remove the temporary file when you dispose the stream.

And then use it

using (var compressedStream = new TempFileStream())
{
    using (var deflateStream = new DeflateStream(
        stream: compressedStream,
        compressionLevel: CompressionLevel.Optimal,
        leaveOpen: true))
    using (var fileStream = File.OpenRead(path))
    {
        fileStream.CopyTo(deflateStream);
    }

    f(compressedStream);
}
  • And why FileOption.Encrypted? – Evk Dec 14 '17 at 10:04
  • Just for being paranoic :o) – Sir Rufo Dec 14 '17 at 10:07
  • I think there's a better approach to this, which is to use an alternative to the built-in DeflateStream. No need for a temporary file at all. I strongly suspect that the DeflateStream in SharpCompress will work. If the OP ever provides a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example, we'll see... – Jon Skeet Dec 14 '17 at 10:28
  • @JonSkeet After a short look at SharpCompress the DeflateStream needs a stream as well - it does not solve the main problem: process memory consumption when using MemoryStream – Sir Rufo Dec 14 '17 at 10:42
  • 1
    Thanks for Sir Rufo's answer, but the solution Jon Skeet suggests using SharpCompress is closer to what I want. I really appreciate spending your time on my question. – MarkusParker Dec 14 '17 at 12:32

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