In Javascript ES6, you are able to destructure arrays like this:

const [a,b,...rest] = someArray;

where a is the first element in the array, b is the second, and rest is an array with the remaining elements.

I know in C#7 that you can destructure tuples during assignment, but could not find anything related to destructuring arrays/enumerables like this:

var (a,b) = someTuple;

I have an IEnumerable where I need the first and second elements as variables, and I need the rest of the elements as another IEnumerable. I have a solution, but feel that destructuring will look cleaner.

  • It's tricky to put the rest as an IEnumerable<T>, because in order to get the first and second elements you need to start iterating. You could wrap the resulting IEnumerator<T> in an IEnumerable<T>, but you'd only be able to iterate over it once. If you don't mind it being copied to a List<T>, that would work, but that's pretty inefficient... – Jon Skeet Dec 14 '17 at 14:32
  • 2
    (Doing all of this with arrays would be much simpler.) – Jon Skeet Dec 14 '17 at 14:32
  • You could use the Succinc<T> library (disclaimer: I wrote it). It provides deconstruction of IEnumerable<T> (without re-enumeration problems that @JonSkeet mentions). Your code would then just be var (a, (b, rest)) = someArray; – David Arno Dec 14 '17 at 14:46
  • @DavidArno I think you should post this as answer, because syntax matches quite close to what OP wants. Even better if it's possible to extract this functionality and post the code of it. – Evk Dec 14 '17 at 14:53
  • @Evk, OK, I've added it as an answer. – David Arno Dec 14 '17 at 15:23
up vote 7 down vote accepted

No, there is not. However, it is not very hard to make something similar.

What about an extension method like this:

public static class EX
{
    public static void Destructure<T>(this T[] items, out T t0)
    {
        t0 = items.Length > 0 ? items[0] : default(T);
    }

    public static void Destructure<T>(this T[] items, out T t0, out T t1)
    {
        t0 = items.Length > 0 ? items[0] : default(T);
        t1 = items.Length > 1 ? items[1] : default(T);
    }
}

And you can use it like so:

int[] items = { 1, 2 };

items.Destructure(out int t0);

The drawback is that you need an extension method per number of items to return. So if you have more than a few variables to return, this method might not be very useful.

Note that I left out checking the length, and related stuff, but you understand what needs to be done I guess.

  • This will probably work for me since I can convert my IEnumerable to an array. The only thing this is missing is getting the rest of the items as a new array, but that is easy to do. – kmc059000 Dec 14 '17 at 14:42
  • You are welcome. Did you downvote and unaccept by accident maybe? Or wasn't it you? @kmc059000 – Patrick Hofman Dec 14 '17 at 14:43
  • No downvotes from me. I misclicked accept. I like both responses so am waiting to officially accept. – kmc059000 Dec 14 '17 at 14:45
  • My question is getting downvoted too. 3 so far. – kmc059000 Dec 14 '17 at 14:45
  • Ah, I see. No problem. Thanks. – Patrick Hofman Dec 14 '17 at 14:46

It turns out not only tuples can be deconstructed but any type which has Deconstruct static (or extension) method with matching signature. Doing deconstruction correctly for IEnumerable is not trivial (see library suggested by David Arno in comments), so let's see how it works with simple IList instead (implementation is irrelevant, this one is for example and of course can be better/different):

public static class Extensions {
    public static void Deconstruct<T>(this IList<T> list, out T first, out IList<T> rest) {

        first = list.Count > 0 ? list[0] : default(T); // or throw
        rest = list.Skip(1).ToList();
    }

    public static void Deconstruct<T>(this IList<T> list, out T first, out T second, out IList<T> rest) {
        first = list.Count > 0 ? list[0] : default(T); // or throw
        second = list.Count > 1 ? list[1] : default(T); // or throw
        rest = list.Skip(2).ToList();
    }
}

Then (after adding relevant using statement if necessary) you can use exactly the syntax you want:

var list = new [] {1,2,3,4};
var (a,rest) = list;
var (b,c,rest2) = list;

Or you can chain deconstruction like this (because last returned value can itself be deconstructed):

 var (a, (b, (c, rest))) = list;

With last version you can deconstruct to any number of items using single Deconstruct method (that one which returns first item and the rest).

For real usage for IEnumerables I'd suggest to not reimplement the wheel and use David Arno's library mentioned above.

What you are describing is generally known in functional languages as "cons", which often takes the form:

let head :: tail = someCollection

I did propose this be added to C#, but it didn't receive very favourable feedback. So I wrote my own, which you can use via the Succinc<T> nuget package.

It uses deconstruction to achieve that splitting of the head and tail of any IEnumerable<T>. Deconstructs can be nested, so you can use it to extract multiple elements in one go:

var (a, (b, rest)) = someArray;

This potentially could provide the functionality you are after.

Really quick: No.

C# does not support destructuring for Arrays yet.

Currently, I cannot find any information of this on the roadmap, either. Seems like there will be a lot of waiting involved until we get this syntactic sugar by default.

As @Nekeniehl added in the comments, it can be implemented though: gist.github.com/waf/280152ab42aa92a85b79d6dbc812e68a

  • There is a way to kind of implement it: gist.github.com/waf/280152ab42aa92a85b79d6dbc812e68a – Nekeniehl Dec 14 '17 at 14:31
  • Since this question is about C# itself, I still think my answer is correct. Nice to see that it can be added, though. – NikxDa Dec 14 '17 at 14:32
  • I'm sorry, I did not want to say your answer is not right. It is actually right, there is no implementation so far, I just wanted to point out that it can be implemented =) – Nekeniehl Dec 14 '17 at 14:33
  • Yeah, I didn't understand it as criticism either, no worries :) Thanks for the information! – NikxDa Dec 14 '17 at 14:34

In C# you will need to write your own, like this one I'm using:

public static class ArrayExtensions
    {
        public static void Deconstruct<T>(this T[] array, out T first, out T[] rest)
        {
            first = array.Length > 0 ? array[0] : default(T);
            rest = array.Skip(1).ToArray();
        }

        public static void Deconstruct<T>(this T[] array, out T first, out T second, out T[] rest)
            => (first, (second, rest)) = array;

        public static void Deconstruct<T>(this T[] array, out T first, out T second, out T third, out T[] rest)
            => (first, second, (third, rest)) = array;

        public static void Deconstruct<T>(this T[] array, out T first, out T second, out T third, out T fourth, out T[] rest)
            => (first, second, third, (fourth, rest)) = array;

        public static void Deconstruct<T>(this T[] array, out T first, out T second, out T third, out T fourth, out T fifth, out T[] rest)
            => (first, second, third, fourth, (fifth, rest)) = array;

// .. etc.
    }

Then simply do:

var (first, second,_ , rest) = new[] { 1, 2, 3, 4 }

There is no special syntax for it in the language.

You could leverage the tuple syntax, though, to arrive at this

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int[] ints = new[] { 1, 2, 3 };

        var (first, second, rest) = ints.Destruct2();
    }
}

public static class Extensions
{
    public static (T first, T[] rest) Desctruct1<T>(this T[] items)
    {
        return (items[0], items.Skip(1).ToArray());
    }

    public static (T first, T second, T[] rest) Destruct2<T>(this T[] items)
    {
        return (items[0], items[1], items.Skip(2).ToArray());
    }
}

(which should be extended with error handling for obvious error scenarios before being used in production code).

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