3

I'm probably just missing something simple but the s/// isn't assigning the changed string to my variable. I try a more simple s/// and it does work.

This example should trim the any digits after the decimal if there are more than three.

my $price = 12.34567;
print "$price\n";
$price =~ s/(\.\d\d[1-9]?)d*/$1/;
print "$1\n";           # This is printing .345 correctly.
print "$price\n";       # This should be 12.345 but is unchanged.

my $story = "dog";
$story =~ s/(do)g/$1/;
print "$story\n"; # This works.  It's changed to "do"

Edit: If the third digit is a zero it should trim it after two digits.

"Prettifying a stock Price: ...always take the first two digits after the decimal point, and take the third digit only if it is not zero. Then, remove any other digits.

  • 3
    Should be \d instead of d. – Benjamin W. Dec 14 '17 at 17:30
  • 1
    Besides the missing backslash, the RE doesn't look right -- what output do you expect for 12.340123? – Jim Garrison Dec 14 '17 at 17:41
  • That was it. Thank you @Benjamin W. Here's the regex from the book: !book excerpt – user3064085 Dec 14 '17 at 17:42
  • O'Reilly ebooks often mess up source code, in my experience with them. I always double check the PDF version when in doubt (and it's available). – Benjamin W. Dec 14 '17 at 18:29
1

Your substitution is wrong.

$price =~ s/(\.\d\d[1-9]?)d*/$1/;

should be

$price =~ s/(\.\d\d[1-9]?)\d*/$1/;

Your own version matches because d* can match an empty string, which it does because there are no d characters after the third decimal place

It seems odd to insist that any third decimal digit must be non-zero. So 0.00 is fine, but 0.000 is not, and will be truncated to the former. Is that what you intended?

  • 1
    Thank you that was it !book image “Prettifying a Stock Price always take the first two digits after the decimal point, and take the third digit only if it is not zero. Then, remove any other digits.” – user3064085 Dec 14 '17 at 17:53
  • This is a known erratum. If you read a technical book, IETF RFC or similar, it is always a good idea to check for errata. – daxim Dec 19 '17 at 9:45
0

Indeed, you missed only a backslash before the last "d".

Change the first substiturion instruction to:

$price =~ s/(\.\d\d[1-9]?)\d*/$1/;

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