2

In the example below I am trying to determine which value is closest to each of the vals_int, by id. I can solve this problem using sapply() in a matter similar to below, but I am wondering if the sapply() part can be done with another function in dplyr.

I am really just interested in if the sapply method and output can be reproduced using some function(s) in the dplyr package. I had thought that do() may work but am struggling to determine how.

library(tidyverse)

df <- data_frame(
  id = rep(1:10, 10) %>% 
    sort,
  visit = rep(1:10, 10),
  value = rnorm(100)
)

vals_int <- c(1, 2, 3)

tmp <- sapply(vals_int,
              function(val_i) abs(df$value - val_i))
3

Yes, you can use the rowwise() and do() functions in dplyr to perform the same operation on every row, like so:

df %>% rowwise %>% do(diffs = abs(.$value - vals_int))

This will create a column called diffs in a new tibble which is a list of vectors with length 3. If you coerce the output that do() returns to be a data frame, it will instead create a tibble with three columns, one for each of the values subtracted.

df %>% rowwise %>% do(as.data.frame(t(abs(.$value - vals_int))))
1

The answer by @qdread does what you are looking for, but the tidyverse is starting to move away from the do() function (if that matters to you, idk). Here is an alternative method using map from the purrr package.

df %>%
  mutate(closest = map(value, function(x){
    abs(x - vals_int) %>%
      t() %>%
      as.tibble()
  })) %>%
  unnest()

That gives you this:

# A tibble: 100 x 6
      id visit       value         V1       V2       V3
   <int> <int>       <dbl>      <dbl>    <dbl>    <dbl>
 1     1     1  0.91813183 0.08186817 1.081868 2.081868
 2     1     2 -1.68556173 2.68556173 3.685562 4.685562
 3     1     3 -0.05984289 1.05984289 2.059843 3.059843
 4     1     4  0.40128729 0.59871271 1.598713 2.598713
 5     1     5 -0.09995526 1.09995526 2.099955 3.099955
 6     1     6  0.81802663 0.18197337 1.181973 2.181973
 7     1     7 -1.49244225 2.49244225 3.492442 4.492442
 8     1     8 -0.74256185 1.74256185 2.742562 3.742562
 9     1     9 -0.43943907 1.43943907 2.439439 3.439439
10     1    10  0.54985857 0.45014143 1.450141 2.450141
# ... with 90 more rows
  • thanks for the comment, I appreciate this solution as well. In fact I was trying to think of a function I had seen before (map), but couldn't remember what it was called. Thanks for pointing this out @tbradley – Steve Reno Dec 19 '17 at 13:59
  • Yes, I highly recommend the purrr package. While map acts more like lapply, the map_dbl and map_chr functions act like sapply in that they return a vector rather than a list. The purrr package was designed with consistency in mind so it is less of a hassle to switch between the different functions as they all take the same arguments in the same order and have less variability in what they return (compared to sapply especially) – tbradley Dec 19 '17 at 14:11

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