I am trying to create a classic if statement with criteria in Python 3. I am able to input a number from this code, but am not able to figure out why the code will not print "hot" or "cold". What can I do to fix this? Do I need to have an elif with this statement?

N = float(input(("Enter Number: ")))
def is_hot (N):
    if N/2>1 and N-1>1:
        print (N, "is hot")
    else:
        N/2<1 and N-1<1
        print (N, "is cold")
  • 3
    Can you format this into a code block? Reading that in plaintext is kind of painful. – enumaris Dec 15 '17 at 3:04
  • 4
    Looks like you need an elif rather than else – Brad Solomon Dec 15 '17 at 3:05
  • 1
    yup its not formatted correctly one but else won't let you have a conditional statement in it itll just error out @BradSolomon said it right – OmegaNalphA Dec 15 '17 at 3:06
  • What about when N is 2? Is that "hot", "cold", or "just right"? – Gary02127 Dec 15 '17 at 14:14
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need to fix your function, because it looks like it needs an elif ...: instead of an else: And you need to actually invoke the function, too, once you've gotten your input. So...

def is_hot (N):
    if N/2>1 and N-1>1:      # N > 2
        print (N, "is hot")
    elif N/2<1 and N-1<1:    # N < 2
        print (N, "is cold")
    else:                    # N is 2
        print (N, "is just right!")
n = float(input(("Enter Number: ")))
is_hot(n)

Note that I did not use N in both places, when calling the func and when defining the func. It would work, but it's not always the best thing as far as code readability.

Also, it's best practice to list your functions at the top of your code.

Also, you can, and probably should, use a different variable names in the function than in the calling code. This is not for functionality, but for readability. If someone is not paying attention, they may see the same name and think it's a global variable. Again, you do not have to use a different variable name, but it's good practice to use different variable names. If nothing else, the variable names in the function will often be more generic, and the variable names in the calling code more specific. Here's an example:

def merge_lists(list1, list2): # generic..
    return zip(list1, list2)
my_merged_inventory_list = merge_lists(list_of_stock_items, list_of_item_prices)
  • What happens if N/2 is 1? Is it really a case of on or off? Maybe you need a final else: statement that says "is just right". If N is 2, is that hot, cold, or just right? – Gary02127 Dec 15 '17 at 3:39
  • Thank you all for your help! This worked perfectly. Why should N not be used in both places? What would the logic be there? When you call the function, you can use a different variable? – Danielle Dec 16 '17 at 3:10
  • Yes, you can, and probably should, use a different variable name. Not for functionality, but for readability. If someone is not paying attention, they may seem the same name and think it's a global variable. Again, you do not have to use a different variable name, but it's good practice to use different variable names. If nothing else, the variable names in the function will often be more generic, and the variable names in the calling code more specific. – Gary02127 Dec 16 '17 at 4:48

Because you only defined the function is_hot(N), but you didn't call it.

  • 3
    Rereading the question, I think this is actually what @Danielle is asking. Call is_hot(N) after your function, or remove the if statement from the function. – Turksarama Dec 15 '17 at 3:12

As @Brad Solomon mention in the comments. Instead of else you shoud use elif.

N = float(input(("Enter Number: ")))
def is_hot (N):
    if (N/2>1 and N-1>1):
        print (N, "is hot")
    elif (N/2<1 and N-1<1) :
        print (N, "is cold")
    else :
        print(N,"neither hot nor cold")

is_hot(N)

Note :- you can also add a default condition (else part) where it doesn't match either of the cases. Update :- Added the calling of the function as suggested by Gary

  • Like the OP, you don't actually call the function... – Gary02127 Dec 15 '17 at 12:22

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