2

I'm attempting to apply shl to an Int value in Kotlin:

val a = 1092455
println(a.toString())
println(toString(bits(one)))
println(toString(bits(one shl 16)))
println(toString(bits(one shr 16)))

This produces the following output:

1092455
0000000000010000 1010101101100111
0000000000000000 0000000000000000
0000000000000000 0000000000010000 

As you can see, shr correctly results in the left most 16 bits (0000000000010000) being shifted to the right, however shl does not give the expected output (1010101101100111 0000000000000000).

What am I missing?

Edit: bits method:

fun bits(value: Int): BooleanArray {
    var x = value.toDouble()
    val result = BooleanArray (32)

    for (i in 31 downTo 0) {
        val d = Math.pow(2.0, i.toDouble())
        if (x >= d) {
            x -= d
            result[i] = true
        }
    }

    return result
}
  • could you please provide the bits implementation? – voddan Dec 15 '17 at 8:30
  • @voddan ah, the bits implementation didn't take signing into account. Ffs – AesSedai101 Dec 15 '17 at 8:34
  • 1
    See how I use toString(2) to print the numbers in my answer – voddan Dec 15 '17 at 8:37
  • @voddan yeah, that's much more elegant, thanks – AesSedai101 Dec 15 '17 at 8:42
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0

Numeric values are signed in Kotlin, to when you shift left the value overflows into the negative numbers. Then the implementation of bits you are using is unable to print the bits correctly.

Here is how it works for me:

val a = 1092455
println((a shr 16).toString(2))
println((a shl 15).toString(2))
println((a shl 16).toString(2))

Prints:

 10000
 1010101101100111000000000000000
-1010100100110010000000000000000

That seems reasonable to me.

To fix your code use Long values:

val a: Long = 1092455
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