I want to create a helper class for my SharedPreference in android using kotlin. Unfortunately I need the Context and I don't want to set it as parameter everytime I call a preference.

If I use a companion object for the context and set it at application-startup I get the following error: Do not place Android context classes in static fields; this is a memory leak (and also breaks Instant Run)

So how to get the context without passing it everytime I call the preferences?

 var isWorking: Boolean
    get() = getBoolean(IS_WORKING)
    set(isWorking) = setPreference(IS_WORKING, isWorking)

 private fun setPreference(key: String, value: Boolean) {
    val editor = settings.edit()
    editor.putBoolean(key, value)
    editor.commit()
}

 private val settings: SharedPreferences by lazy {
    context.getSharedPreferences("prefs", Context.MODE_PRIVATE)
}
  • 2
    This doesn't answer your question, but you should pass the context every time. As the message says, it's possible that the activity will leak if the operation is still running when the activity finishes. In my experience, I always saw PreferenceHelper classes that receive a context when some operation is made. – Iulian Popescu Dec 15 '17 at 8:33

You can create an extension function like below:

object PreferenceHelper {

    fun defaultPrefs(context: Context): SharedPreferences
            = PreferenceManager.getDefaultSharedPreferences(context)

    fun customPrefs(context: Context, name: String): SharedPreferences
            = context.getSharedPreferences(name, Context.MODE_PRIVATE)

    inline fun SharedPreferences.edit(operation: (SharedPreferences.Editor) -> Unit) {
            val editor = this.edit()
            operation(editor)
            editor.apply()
        }
}

Edit: Here is the reference for this answer. You can check how to refactor util classes with Kotlin tricks and use it.

Edit2:

You can change your helper to class and init this in your Application. Then you can use wherever you want. I think this is what you're trying to do. Let's do it.

class PreferenceHelper constructor(context: Context){

        fun defaultPrefs(): SharedPreferences
                = PreferenceManager.getDefaultSharedPreferences(context)

        fun customPrefs(name: String): SharedPreferences
                = context.getSharedPreferences(name, Context.MODE_PRIVATE)

        inline fun SharedPreferences.edit(operation: (SharedPreferences.Editor) -> Unit) {
                val editor = this.edit()
                operation(editor)
                editor.apply()
            }
    }

And in your Application class:

class YourApp : Application() {

    override fun onCreate() {
        super.onCreate()
        YourApp.prefHelper = PreferenceHelper(this)
    }

    companion object {
        lateinit var prefHelper: PreferenceHelper
            private set
    }
}

And you can use wherever you want like below:

YourApp.prefHelper.defaultPrefs().edit {
    // Your shared pref operations.
}

I think the first one is more close to best practice but the second one is also okay. You can use which one you need. Also, there are more cool examples in the link content which I provided above.

  • Thanks for your answer. But thats not really what I wanted. I see no difference here in just calling my helper class with a constructor. – Thomas Klammer Dec 15 '17 at 8:53
  • 1
    i edited my answer and tried to implement what you want to do. i prefer 1st one but second one is also okey – savepopulation Dec 15 '17 at 9:29

Instead of a class, consider using an object. There will be only one instance of it and SharedPreferences can be initialized with application's context, like so:

object AppPreferences {
    private const val NAME = "SpinKotlin"
    private const val MODE = Context.MODE_PRIVATE
    private lateinit var preferences: SharedPreferences
    // list of app specific preferences
    private val IS_FIRST_RUN_PREF = Pair("is_first_run", false)

    fun init(context: Context) {
        preferences = context.getSharedPreferences(NAME, MODE)
    }

    /**
    * SharedPreferences extension function, so we won't need to call edit() 
        and apply()
    * ourselves on every SharedPreferences operation.
    */
    private inline fun SharedPreferences.edit(operation: 
        (SharedPreferences.Editor) -> Unit) {
        val editor = edit()
        operation(editor)
        editor.apply()
    }

    var firstRun: Boolean
        // custom getter to get a preference of a desired type, with a predefined default value
        get() = preferences.getBoolean(IS_FIRST_RUN_PREF.first, IS_FIRST_RUN_PREF.second)

        // custom setter to save a preference back to preferences file
        set(value) = preferences.edit {
            it.putBoolean(IS_FIRST_RUN_PREF.first, value)
        }
}

In Application class:

class SpInKotlinApp : Application() {
    override fun onCreate() {
        super.onCreate()
        AppPreferences.init(this)
    }
}

And because of simplifying reading and writing to properties with custom get() and set() methods, assigning a value is very easy:

if (!AppPreferences.firstRun) {
        AppPreferences.firstRun = true
        Log.d("SpinKotlin", "The value of our pref is: ${AppPreferences.firstRun}")
    }

Check a whole explanation here.

I've found a solution for my problem. I solved it by persisting the SharedPreferences variable instead of the context.

object PreferenceDao {
    private lateinit var settings: SharedPreferences

    fun init(context: Context) {
        settings = context.getSharedPreferences("prefs", Context.MODE_PRIVATE)
    }
}

The init function gets called in my Application class.

  • Have you considered using a dependency injection framework? – tynn Dec 15 '17 at 11:41
  • whats that? never heard of it. – Thomas Klammer Dec 18 '17 at 9:10

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