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I'm running a Python script on my windows 10 machine. The script reads compressed data files, stored as .tar.gz, processes it, and then reads the next one. In this manner it processes thousands of files.

I run the scipt in a windows10 powershell, and -seemingly randomly- I often get the following error:

python_stopped_working

Some times this happens after a day, sometimes already after a few minutes. I select 'Close program' and the script is terminated. Looking into Windows event viewer, I can see the following entry:

Faulting application name: python.exe, version: 3.6.2150.1013, time stamp: 0x59c1326e Faulting module name: multiarray.cp36-win_amd64.pyd, version: 0.0.0.0, time stamp: 0x59c3eeda Exception code: 0xc0000005

Any ideas on how to avoid this error message?

  • 2
    You should start it in environment where you can see the error (probably some exception) – Erik Šťastný Dec 15 '17 at 8:58
  • Can you post the relevant part of the script? – 101 Dec 15 '17 at 8:58
  • I'm logging errors to a .txt file. There are none. Hence I also do not know at which line the script crashes... – Nickj Dec 15 '17 at 9:06
  • 1
    I would suggest running the script in the command prompt or PowerShell. There, you will be able to see where exactly the script runs into issues. – Hameer Abbasi Dec 15 '17 at 9:06
  • Could you have different versions of Python installed? – Kian Dec 15 '17 at 9:10
4

0xc0000005 means 'memory access violation' error. The related info seems to indicate this happens when python is processing arrays.

You can try to trouble shoot by adding logs so you can identify the issue. The problem may be solved by changing related code.

If you are able to replicate the issue consistently and the python code seems correct - it may be a rare case of a bug in python.

  • thx. Very helpful. Any ideas on how I can find out where exactly multiarray.cp36-win_amd64.pyd is being used in my script? – Nickj Dec 15 '17 at 9:16
  • Check if your code is using try except blocks. You can try to print stack trace report so you get some idea which line of your code led to the issue. See docs.python.org/3/library/traceback.html for examples. – Deepak Garud Dec 15 '17 at 9:22

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