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I would like to generate a public/private key pair deterministically from a passphrase with libsodium. Whenever/wherever the user types his passphrase, s/he will get back the same key pair.

My approach is to acquire the passphrase somehow (e.g., fgets), hash it with crypto_generichash, and then use the hash as a seed to crypto_sign_seed_keypair:

#include <assert.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sodium.h>

int main (void) {
    char passphrase[1024];
    printf("ENTER PASSPHRASE: ");
    {
        char* ret = fgets(passphrase, sizeof(passphrase), stdin);
        assert(ret != NULL);
        assert(passphrase[strlen(passphrase)-1] == '\n');
        passphrase[strlen(passphrase)-1] = '\0';
    }

    unsigned char hash[crypto_generichash_BYTES];
    {
        int ret = crypto_generichash(hash, crypto_generichash_BYTES,
                                     (unsigned char*)passphrase, strlen(passphrase),
                                     NULL, 0);
        assert(ret == 0);
    }

    unsigned char pk[crypto_sign_PUBLICKEYBYTES];
    unsigned char sk[crypto_sign_SECRETKEYBYTES];
    {
        assert(crypto_generichash_BYTES == crypto_sign_SEEDBYTES);
        int ret = crypto_sign_seed_keypair(pk, sk, hash);
        assert(ret == 0);
    }
    printf("PUBLIC KEY:\n");
    for (int i=0; i<crypto_sign_PUBLICKEYBYTES; i++) {
        printf("%02X ", pk[i]);
    }
    printf("\n");
    printf("PRIVATE KEY:\n");
    for (int i=0; i<crypto_sign_SECRETKEYBYTES; i++) {
        printf("%02X ", sk[i]);
    }
    printf("\n");

    return 0;
}

Assuming the passphrase is strong, is this scheme safe and practical?

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Your code is fine, but even a "strong" passphrase has a pretty low entropy. Therefore, instead of a generic hash function, you may want to use a password hashing function.

  • In my case, since the user would not be able to find out the salt, should I just use a fixed value? (The hash/salt is not stored anywhere.) Is it still much better than a generic hash? – fsantanna Dec 16 '17 at 0:44
  • A fixed salt is fine. You can set it to something unique to your application. – Frank Denis Dec 31 '17 at 11:54

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