0

So I am doing the FreeCodeCamp challenge "Remove all falsy values from an array."

I made a function, but for some reason it does not filter all the falsy values:

function bouncer(arr) {

function truthy(value) {
 return value !==  '' ||false || null || undefined || NaN ;
}

 var filtered = arr.filter(truthy);
 return filtered;
}

bouncer([7, "ate", "", false, 9]);

This should return

[7, "ate", 9], 

but instead returns

[ 7, 'ate', false, 9 ]

If I switch the order of the function truthy, the returned values changes. For example moving the '',

function truthy(value) {
   return value !==  '' ||false || null || undefined || NaN ;

----->

  return false || null || undefined || NaN || " ; 

The new

false || null || undefined || NaN || " ; returns

[ 7, 'ate', '', 9 ]

Any idea what is going on??? Thanks!

  • 2
    you can't do || like that. you have to check each one with == – Daniel A. White Dec 16 '17 at 1:57
  • ... also, it should be AND && not OR ||. – ibrahim mahrir Dec 16 '17 at 2:02
  • over thinking it... consider what if(value) would do – charlietfl Dec 16 '17 at 2:14
  • @charlietfl over thinking it even more... since he is using filter, he could use Boolean like: .filter(Boolean);. – ibrahim mahrir Dec 16 '17 at 2:18
  • @ibrahimmahrir right...I get it, but for OP might be more of an aid thinking if() first to get the concept set – charlietfl Dec 16 '17 at 2:21
5

return value !== '' ||false || null || undefined || NaN ;

This does not do what you think it does. It's actually equivalent to

(((((value !== '') || false) || null) || undefined) || NaN)

When value !== '', as in most of your cases, this expression is true. You would actually need to check

value !==  '' && value !== false && value !== null && value !== undefined && value !== NaN

But since these are all falsy anyway and Array.filter only cares about truthiness and falsiness, you can replace your truthy function with

function truthy(value) {
  return value;
}

which isn't even worth breaking out three lines for:

var filtered = arr.filter(e => e);
  • You could also mention Boolean: var filtered = arr.filter(Boolean); – ibrahim mahrir Dec 16 '17 at 2:29
  • Thank you!! This was literally the answer I was looking for. I have seen solutions, such as yours, that solve this problem better than mine, but what I really wanted was an explanation for what was going on in the function that I was trying to put together. I figured something like that was going on. Feels much better to know what was going on! – mso4491 Dec 16 '17 at 5:24
1

In addition to AuxTaco's answer...

  1. "All falsy values" include 0 as well.

  2. You can shorten the filter expression a bit further, by using Boolean as function:

function bouncer(arr) {
  return arr.filter(Boolean);
}

console.log(bouncer([7, "ate", "", false, 9, 0, NaN, null, undefined]));

  • Yes, this is a good answer and the one FreeCodeCamp recommends. I was hoping to figure out why my code didn't work the way I wanted, even though after seeing the solution, that mine was not the best approach. – mso4491 Dec 16 '17 at 5:28
0

The problem is, your return statement, will always return true when the value is different than blank

function truthy(value) {
    return value !==  '' ||false || null || undefined || NaN ;
}

should be something like this

function truthy(value) {
    falseValues = ['',false,null,undefined,NaN];
    return !falseValues.contains(value);
}
  • This is interesting. As a novice, I haven't come across an approach like this. Thanks for sharing. – mso4491 Dec 16 '17 at 5:30
  • I try to think in scalability, if you need to change the truthy condition (let's say, you also want to exclude the number 7) you simply add the extra falsy value to the array – Marcelo Origoni Dec 16 '17 at 14:15

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