87

I got this array,

var rockets = [
    { country:'Russia', launches:32 },
    { country:'US', launches:23 },
    { country:'China', launches:16 },
    { country:'Europe(ESA)', launches:7 },
    { country:'India', launches:4 },
    { country:'Japan', launches:3 }
];

What do I need to do to return an array mapped, that adds 10 to each

launches

value, here my first approach,

var launchOptimistic = rockets.map(function(elem){
  // return  elem.launches+10;
     return (elem.country, elem.launches+10);


});
console.log(launchOptimistic);
2
  • Do you want to alter the original objects? Or do you want to create new objects (copies)? Dec 16, 2017 at 2:07
  • return array similar can be new Dec 16, 2017 at 2:08

7 Answers 7

163

Use .map without return in simple way. Also start using let and const instead of var because let and const is more recommended

const rockets = [
    { country:'Russia', launches:32 },
    { country:'US', launches:23 },
    { country:'China', launches:16 },
    { country:'Europe(ESA)', launches:7 },
    { country:'India', launches:4 },
    { country:'Japan', launches:3 }
];

const launchOptimistic = rockets.map(elem => (
  {
    country: elem.country,
    launches: elem.launches+10
  } 
));

console.log(launchOptimistic);

3
  • 7
    Just one question: why are rounded paretheses around the returned object necessary? Why can't that lambda just return the object like this: const launchOptimistic = rockets.map(elem => { country: elem.country, launches: elem.launches+10 } ); ?
    – Iorweth333
    Dec 17, 2020 at 21:48
  • 10
    Rounded parenthesis is used to return statements with multi line. Jan 2, 2021 at 21:47
  • 13
    @Iorweth333 because the syntax () => {} uses braces to declare a function body, so instead of returning an object, it would actually try to evaluate the contents of the braces as a function, and throw syntax errors.
    – Ryan
    Apr 21, 2021 at 23:24
58

You're very close already, you just need to return the new object that you want. In this case, the same one except with the launches value incremented by 10:

var rockets = [
    { country:'Russia', launches:32 },
    { country:'US', launches:23 },
    { country:'China', launches:16 },
    { country:'Europe(ESA)', launches:7 },
    { country:'India', launches:4 },
    { country:'Japan', launches:3 }
];

var launchOptimistic = rockets.map(function(elem) {
  return {
    country: elem.country,
    launches: elem.launches+10,
  } 
});

console.log(launchOptimistic);

10

If you want to alter the original objects, then a simple Array#forEach will do:

rockets.forEach(function(rocket) {
    rocket.launches += 10;
});

If you want to keep the original objects unaltered, then use Array#map and copy the objects using Object#assign:

var newRockets = rockets.map(function(rocket) {
    var newRocket = Object.assign({}, rocket);
    newRocket.launches += 10;
    return newRocket;
});
1
  • 1
    You meant to use map in the second example instead the forEach?
    – T30
    Mar 15, 2021 at 0:09
7

The cleanest solution is destructuring.

const rockets = [
        { country:'Russia', launches:32 },
        { country:'US', launches:23 },
        { country:'China', launches:16 },
        { country:'Europe(ESA)', launches:7 },
        { country:'India', launche`enter code here`s:4 },
        { country:'Japan', launches:3 }
    ];
    const updated = rockets.map(rocket=>{
    return {...rocket,launches:rocket.launches+10}
    });
4

map rockets and add 10 to its launches:

var rockets = [
    { country:'Russia', launches:32 },
    { country:'US', launches:23 },
    { country:'China', launches:16 },
    { country:'Europe(ESA)', launches:7 },
    { country:'India', launches:4 },
    { country:'Japan', launches:3 }
];
rockets.map((itm) => {
    itm.launches += 10
    return itm
})
console.log(rockets)

If you don't want to modify rockets you can do:

var plusTen = []
rockets.forEach((itm) => {
    plusTen.push({'country': itm.country, 'launches': itm.launches + 10})
})
2
  • 8
    I would note that this will mutate the items in the original array.
    – CRice
    Dec 16, 2017 at 2:07
  • @CRice true, another option that doesn't mutate the original array was added
    – Nir Alfasi
    Apr 4, 2021 at 13:44
3

Considering objects can have many properties, It would be better to spread the object's content and to reassign specific properties, to achieve code that is more succinct.

const rockets = [
    { country:'Russia', launches:32 },
    { country:'US', launches:23 },
    { country:'China', launches:16 },
    { country:'Europe(ESA)', launches:7 },
    { country:'India', launches:4 },
    { country:'Japan', launches:3 }
];

const launchOptimistic = rockets.map(function(elem) {
  return {
    ...elem,
    launches: elem.launches+10,
  } 
});

console.log(launchOptimistic);

2

Solution (One Liner) With a Fresh Example

Suppose the clients in your bank (including you, of course) got a bonus.

let finance = [
    {funds:10050, client_id: 1020},
    {funds:25000, client_id: 77},
    {funds:90000, client_id: 442}
];

finance = finance.map(({funds, client_id}) => {funds = funds + 2000; return {funds, client_id}});

↑ Test & copy as is to Chrome / Firefox / Edge DevTools console ↑

This technique called Destructuring Assignment

The destructuring assignment syntax is a JavaScript expression that makes it possible to unpack values from arrays, or properties from objects, into distinct variables.

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