131

I got this array,

const rockets = [
    { country:'Russia', launches:32 },
    { country:'US', launches:23 },
    { country:'China', launches:16 },
    { country:'Europe(ESA)', launches:7 },
    { country:'India', launches:4 },
    { country:'Japan', launches:3 }
];

What do I need to do in order to return an array mapped, that adds 10 to each launches value.

Here's my first approach:

const launchOptimistic = rockets.map(function(elem){
     return (elem.country, elem.launches+10);
});
console.log(launchOptimistic);
2
  • Do you want to alter the original objects? Or do you want to create new objects (copies)? Commented Dec 16, 2017 at 2:07
  • return array similar can be new Commented Dec 16, 2017 at 2:08

8 Answers 8

244

Use .map without return in simple way. Also start using let and const instead of var because let and const is more recommended

const rockets = [
    { country:'Russia', launches:32 },
    { country:'US', launches:23 },
    { country:'China', launches:16 },
    { country:'Europe(ESA)', launches:7 },
    { country:'India', launches:4 },
    { country:'Japan', launches:3 }
];

const launchOptimistic = rockets.map(elem => (
  {
    country: elem.country,
    launches: elem.launches+10
  } 
));

console.log(launchOptimistic);

3
  • 15
    Just one question: why are rounded paretheses around the returned object necessary? Why can't that lambda just return the object like this: const launchOptimistic = rockets.map(elem => { country: elem.country, launches: elem.launches+10 } ); ?
    – Iorweth333
    Commented Dec 17, 2020 at 21:48
  • 15
    Rounded parenthesis is used to return statements with multi line. Commented Jan 2, 2021 at 21:47
  • 40
    @Iorweth333 because the syntax () => {} uses braces to declare a function body, so instead of returning an object, it would actually try to evaluate the contents of the braces as a function, and throw syntax errors.
    – Ryan
    Commented Apr 21, 2021 at 23:24
63

You're very close already, you just need to return the new object that you want. In this case, the same one except with the launches value incremented by 10:

const rockets = [
    { country:'Russia', launches:32 },
    { country:'US', launches:23 },
    { country:'China', launches:16 },
    { country:'Europe(ESA)', launches:7 },
    { country:'India', launches:4 },
    { country:'Japan', launches:3 }
];

const launchOptimistic = rockets.map(function(elem) {
  return {
    country: elem.country,
    launches: elem.launches+10,
  } 
});

console.log(launchOptimistic);

14

If you want to alter the original objects, then a simple Array#forEach will do:

rockets.forEach(function(rocket) {
    rocket.launches += 10;
});

If you want to keep the original objects unaltered, then use Array#map and copy the objects using Object#assign:

const newRockets = rockets.map(function(rocket) {
    const newRocket = Object.assign({}, rocket);
    newRocket.launches += 10;
    return newRocket;
});

A better alternative to using Object.assign is to use the spread syntax as per Emre's answer.

3
  • 1
    You meant to use map in the second example instead the forEach?
    – T30
    Commented Mar 15, 2021 at 0:09
  • Why Object.assign()? The other map examples did not use it.
    – Timo
    Commented Apr 7 at 7:50
  • 1
    @Timo so that if you have a lot of key-value pairs in the original objects and you only want to change one, you don't have to manually copy them all onto the new objects, you just copy the entire object first using Object.assign then change only the key-value pair you want. This was answered before the spread syntax was a thing if I remember correctly, otherwise it would have been better with a spread syntax (see Emre's answer bellow, it achieves pretty much the same thing as Object.assign using the spread syntax). Commented Apr 9 at 12:31
12

The cleanest solution is to use the spread syntax to generate the new objects:

const launchOptimistic = rockets.map(rocket => {
    return { ...rocket, launches: rocket.launches + 10 };
});
5

map rockets and add 10 to its launches:

const rockets = [
    { country:'Russia', launches:32 },
    { country:'US', launches:23 },
    { country:'China', launches:16 },
    { country:'Europe(ESA)', launches:7 },
    { country:'India', launches:4 },
    { country:'Japan', launches:3 }
];
rockets.map((itm) => {
    itm.launches += 10
    return itm
})
console.log(rockets)

If you don't want to modify rockets you can do:

var plusTen = []
rockets.forEach((itm) => {
    plusTen.push({'country': itm.country, 'launches': itm.launches + 10})
})
1
  • CRice noted that this will mutate the items in the original array, which was rejected to be included into the answer. Please consider that I am not this user, I just wanted to give the credit.
    – Cadoiz
    Commented Mar 7, 2023 at 7:42
4

Considering objects can have many properties, It would be better to spread the object's content and to reassign specific properties, to achieve code that is more succinct.

const rockets = [
    { country:'Russia', launches:32 },
    { country:'US', launches:23 },
    { country:'China', launches:16 },
    { country:'Europe(ESA)', launches:7 },
    { country:'India', launches:4 },
    { country:'Japan', launches:3 }
];

const launchOptimistic = rockets.map(function(elem) {
  return {
    ...elem,
    launches: elem.launches+10,
  } 
});

console.log(launchOptimistic);

4

Solution (One Liner) With a Fresh Example

Suppose the clients in your bank (including you, of course) got a bonus.

let finance = [
    {funds:10050, client_id: 1020},
    {funds:25000, client_id: 77},
    {funds:90000, client_id: 442}
];

finance = finance.map(({funds, client_id}) => {funds = funds + 2000; return {funds, client_id}});

↑ Test & copy as is to Chrome / Firefox / Edge DevTools console ↑

This technique called Destructuring Assignment

The destructuring assignment syntax is a JavaScript expression that makes it possible to unpack values from arrays, or properties from objects, into distinct variables.

4

Funny how every single solution relies on heavy funcitons and returns, except the one that uses an external accumulator, resembling more a reduce or a forEach. In any case, this subverts the original intention of the map and, in fact, of all Functional Programming: say what, not how. And yes, map is Functional Programming!

Here's a thought:

const rockets = [
    { country: 'Russia', launches: 32 },
    { country: 'US', launches: 23 },
    { country: 'China', launches: 16 },
    { country: 'Europe(ESA)', launches: 7 },
    { country: 'India', launches: 4 },
    { country: 'Japan', launches: 3 }
]

const updated = rockets.map( rocket => ({...rocket, launches: rocket.launches + 10}) )

Please notice that:

  1. This is a true one-liner because it does not use return. (cf. Emre's answer, Stas Sorokin's answer or nir segev's answer.) The trick is the parenthesis around the result object. Without these, the syntax will "think" you're going for a code block and expect statements instead of expressions, and a return at the end.
  2. This does not change the original object (Nir Alfasi's answer) or uses global state (vera's edit)
  3. This uses destructured assignment, which is something many answers use, but funny enough, is explicitly mentioned in Stas Sorokin's answer, with the link to MDN and all. Dear Stas, foillow your own link, because your answer does NOT use destructured assignment AT ALL!
  4. This answer also fixes formatting because I was not raised by wolves. You have your spaces after commas and colons, you don't have useless semicolons because they only make sense in minified JS and webpack does that for you, and you don't have double tabs for single structure nesting (like Emre's answer), because that's just flat out fugly and almost as bad as no indentation at all.
0

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