49

I want to execute an async function every time the Flask route is executed. Why is the abar function never executed?

import asyncio
from flask import Flask

async def abar(a):
    print(a)

loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
app = Flask(__name__)

@app.route("/")
def notify():
    asyncio.ensure_future(abar("abar"), loop=loop)
    return "OK"

if __name__ == "__main__":
    app.run(debug=False, use_reloader=False)
    loop.run_forever()

I also tried putting the blocking call in a separate thread. But it is still not calling the abar function.

import asyncio
from threading import Thread
from flask import Flask

async def abar(a):
    print(a)

app = Flask(__name__)

def start_worker(loop):
    asyncio.set_event_loop(loop)
    try:
        loop.run_forever()
    finally:
        loop.close()

worker_loop = asyncio.new_event_loop()
worker = Thread(target=start_worker, args=(worker_loop,))

@app.route("/")
def notify():
    asyncio.ensure_future(abar("abar"), loop=worker_loop)
    return "OK"

if __name__ == "__main__":
    worker.start()
    app.run(debug=False, use_reloader=False)
2
  • 2
    app.run and loop.run_forever are both blocking. You’re probably better off using a thread. If you need to use asyncio, you should look into one of the Flask-like frameworks built on top of it. – dirn Dec 16 '17 at 6:08
  • @dim Thank you very much. I tried to move one blocking into a seperate thread. S. my edited question! – user24502 Dec 16 '17 at 11:20
39

You can incorporate some async functionality into Flask apps without having to completely convert them to asyncio.

import asyncio
from flask import Flask

async def abar(a):
    print(a)

loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
app = Flask(__name__)

@app.route("/")
def notify():
    loop.run_until_complete(abar("abar"))
    return "OK"

if __name__ == "__main__":
    app.run(debug=False, use_reloader=False)

This will block the Flask response until the async function returns, but it still allows you to do some clever things. I've used this pattern to perform many external requests in parallel using aiohttp, and then when they are complete, I'm back into traditional flask for data processing and template rendering.

import aiohttp
import asyncio
import async_timeout
from flask import Flask

loop = asyncio.get_event_loop()
app = Flask(__name__)

async def fetch(url):
    async with aiohttp.ClientSession() as session, async_timeout.timeout(10):
        async with session.get(url) as response:
            return await response.text()

def fight(responses):
    return "Why can't we all just get along?"

@app.route("/")
def index():
    # perform multiple async requests concurrently
    responses = loop.run_until_complete(asyncio.gather(
        fetch("https://google.com/"),
        fetch("https://bing.com/"),
        fetch("https://duckduckgo.com"),
        fetch("http://www.dogpile.com"),
    ))

    # do something with the results
    return fight(responses)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    app.run(debug=False, use_reloader=False)
6
  • 3
    As it is typical to run Flask in production with an async worker such as gevent, meinheld or eventlet, I think it is important to note that this solution would block the gevent/meinheld/eventlet event-loop. Which in turn would negate some the advantage of using them. – pgjones Jan 9 '19 at 19:34
  • 1
    What happens when the aiohttp wsgi worker is used ? aiohttp-wsgi.readthedocs.io/en/stable/index.html. Will the event loop in the worker be blocked even then? – Arvind Sridharan Apr 4 '19 at 12:59
  • 13
    Your example gives me RuntimeError: There is no current event loop in thread 'Thread-1'.. Repro: 1) I've saved your snippet to soexamp.py; 2) ran python soexamp.py; 3) than ` curl localhost:5000/`. My flask.__version__ is '1.0.2' and aiohttp.__version__ is '3.5.4'. – Anton Daneyko Apr 12 '19 at 15:27
  • 7
    This is not thread safe, you can't simply use loop.run_until_complete() from arbitrary threads. An asyncio loop is thread specific. Any real-life WSGI deployment will be using threads. Instead of calling asyncio.get_event_loop() you'd have to create a new event loop per thread. That's... overkill however. – Martijn Pieters Oct 29 '19 at 18:32
  • 2
    @ravimalhotra: not thread safe means that things can break because multiple threads are altering the same data structures unless you take threading into account. The asyncio event loop implementation is not thread safe apart from a few explicitly documented functions. The code here doesn't create a new event loop per thread, nor does it pass coroutines to the single thread correctly. Note that I also posted an answer to this question that addresses these issues better. – Martijn Pieters Mar 15 '20 at 16:06
30

A simpler solution to your problem (in my biased view) is to switch to Quart from Flask. If so your snippet simplifies to,

import asyncio
from quart import Quart

async def abar(a):
    print(a)

app = Quart(__name__)

@app.route("/")
async def notify():
    await abar("abar")
    return "OK"

if __name__ == "__main__":
    app.run(debug=False)

As noted in the other answers the Flask app run is blocking, and does not interact with an asyncio loop. Quart on the other hand is the Flask API built on asyncio, so it should work how you expect.

Also as an update, Flask-Aiohttp is no longer maintained.

4
  • I have a couple of libraries which have synchronous/blocking functions What would happen then when I switch to quart? When I call functions in those libraries it would block the event loop right? – Arvind Sridharan Apr 4 '19 at 13:04
  • Yes, they will block. You can wrap the calls to these functions with asyncio.run_in_executor and await that (by default runs the functions in another thread). Alternatively you can switch to a asyncio based alternative library. – pgjones Apr 6 '19 at 8:21
  • I am sorry for the downvote but answers telling you to switch the whole framework when you want to be able to trigger background task are not really helpful – Eric Burel Jul 16 '20 at 15:29
  • Quart is a nice suggestion, but your answer doesn't actually address the question properly, because you await the call which the OP wants to happen asynchronously, independent of the server response. – deed02392 Nov 13 '20 at 11:37
18

Your mistake is to try to run the asyncio event loop after calling app.run(). The latter doesn't return, it instead runs the Flask development server.

In fact, that's how most WSGI setups will work; either the main thread is going to busy dispatching requests, or the Flask server is imported as a module in a WSGI server, and you can't start an event loop here either.

You'll instead have to run your asyncio event loop in a separate thread, then run your coroutines in that separate thread via asyncio.run_coroutine_threadsafe(). See the Coroutines and Multithreading section in the documentation for what this entails.

Here is an implementation of a module that will run such an event loop thread, and gives you the utilities to schedule coroutines to be run in that loop:

import asyncio
import itertools
import time
import threading

__all__ = ["EventLoopThread", "get_event_loop", "stop_event_loop", "run_coroutine"]

class EventLoopThread(threading.Thread):
    loop = None
    _count = itertools.count(0)

    def __init__(self):
        name = f"{type(self).__name__}-{next(self._count)}"
        super().__init__(name=name, daemon=True)

    def __repr__(self):
        loop, r, c, d = self.loop, False, True, False
        if loop is not None:
            r, c, d = loop.is_running(), loop.is_closed(), loop.get_debug()
        return (
            f"<{type(self).__name__} {self.name} id={self.ident} "
            f"running={r} closed={c} debug={d}>"
        )

    def run(self):
        self.loop = loop = asyncio.new_event_loop()
        asyncio.set_event_loop(loop)

        try:
            loop.run_forever()
        finally:
            try:
                shutdown_asyncgens = loop.shutdown_asyncgens()
            except AttributeError:
                pass
            else:
                loop.run_until_complete(shutdown_asyncgens)
            loop.close()
            asyncio.set_event_loop(None)

    def stop(self):
        loop, self.loop = self.loop, None
        if loop is None:
            return
        loop.call_soon_threadsafe(loop.stop)
        self.join()

_lock = threading.Lock()
_loop_thread = None

def get_event_loop():
    global _loop_thread

    if _loop_thread is None:
        with _lock:
            if _loop_thread is None:
                _loop_thread = EventLoopThread()
                _loop_thread.start()
                # give the thread up to a second to produce a loop
                deadline = time.time() + 1
                while not _loop_thread.loop and time.time() < deadline:
                    time.sleep(0.001)

    return _loop_thread.loop

def stop_event_loop():
    global _loop_thread
    with _lock:
        if _loop_thread is not None:
            _loop_thread.stop()
            _loop_thread = None

def run_coroutine(coro):
    """Run the coroutine in the event loop running in a separate thread

    Returns a Future, call Future.result() to get the output

    """
    return asyncio.run_coroutine_threadsafe(coro, get_event_loop())

You can use the run_coroutine() function defined here to schedule asyncio routines. Use the returned Future instance to control the coroutine:

  • Get the result with Future.result(). You can give this a timeout; if no result is produced within the timeout, the coroutine is automatically cancelled.
  • You can query the state of the coroutine with the .cancelled(), .running() and .done() methods.
  • You can add callbacks to the future, which will be called when the coroutine has completed, or is cancelled or raised an exception (take into account that this is probably going to be called from the event loop thread, not the thread that you called run_coroutine() in).

For your specific example, where abar() doesn't return any result, you can just ignore the returned future, like this:

@app.route("/")
def notify():
    run_coroutine(abar("abar"))
    return "OK"

Note that before Python 3.8 that you can't use an event loop running on a separate thread to create subprocesses with! See my answer to Python3 Flask asyncio subprocess in route hangs for backport of the Python 3.8 ThreadedChildWatcher class for a work-around for this.

2
  • This worked for me, one issue I didn't forsee, you have to make sure that everything you are doing related to the event loop happens INSIDE the coroutine. for example I had created my HTTPClient class with self.client_session = aiohttp.ClientSession(...) in its constructor. That was a no-no, I had to move the construction of the aiohttp.ClientSession into a getter that would be invoked from inside the coroutine, so that the aiohttp.ClientSession would be built in / linked to the event loop thread correctly – forestj Jan 4 at 19:11
  • @forestj: yes, many asyncio-dependent classes will create a reference to the current loop in their initialiser (loop = asyncio.get_running_loop()). Thanks for the correction on the return statement in get_event_loop(); please don't suggest edits that include an edit note, if your edit is too small to fit a suggested edit I much prefer a comment instead. – Martijn Pieters Jan 4 at 19:45
7

For same reason you won't see this print:

if __name__ == "__main__":
    app.run(debug=False, use_reloader=False)
    print('Hey!')
    loop.run_forever()

loop.run_forever() is never called since as @dirn already noted app.run is also blocking.

Running global blocking event loop - is only way you can run asyncio coroutines and tasks, but it's not compatible with running blocking Flask app (or with any other such thing in general).

If you want to use asynchronous web framework you should choose one created to be asynchronous. For example, probably most popular now is aiohttp:

from aiohttp import web


async def hello(request):
    return web.Response(text="Hello, world")


if __name__ == "__main__":
    app = web.Application()
    app.router.add_get('/', hello)
    web.run_app(app)  # this runs asyncio event loop inside

Upd:

About your try to run event loop in background thread. I didn't investigate much, but it seems problem somehow related with tread-safety: many asyncio objects are not thread-safe. If you change your code this way, it'll work:

def _create_task():
    asyncio.ensure_future(abar("abar"), loop=worker_loop)

@app.route("/")
def notify():
    worker_loop.call_soon_threadsafe(_create_task)
    return "OK"

But again, this is very bad idea. It's not only very inconvenient, but I guess wouldn't make much sense: if you're going to use thread to start asyncio, why don't just use threads in Flask instead of asyncio? You will have Flask you want and parallelization.

If I still didn't convince you, at least take a look at Flask-aiohttp project. It has close to Flask api and I think still better that what you're trying to do.

1
  • Thank you very much for your explanation. That makes sense. Also its a nice small aiohttp example. Unfortunately I am binded to flask/flask-ask for an alexa skill. I have modified my original question and moved one blocking call in a seperate thread. But still no luck – user24502 Dec 16 '17 at 11:27
0

Thanks for JL Diaz ( From RealPython ) for providing a working code for the above that was not working.

If anything here should be changed, feel free to comment.

import aiohttp
import asyncio
import async_timeout
from quart import Quart, jsonify

app = Quart(__name__)

async def fetch(url):
    async with aiohttp.ClientSession() as session, async_timeout.timeout(10):
        async with session.get(url) as response:
            return await response.text()

def fight(responses):
    return jsonify([len(r) for r in responses])

@app.route("/")
async def index():
    # perform multiple async requests concurrently
    responses = await asyncio.gather(
        fetch("https://google.com/"),
        fetch("https://bing.com/"),
        fetch("https://duckduckgo.com"),
        fetch("http://www.dogpile.com"),
    )

    # do something with the results
    return fight(responses)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    app.run(debug=False, use_reloader=False)

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