8

I compiled the following program with both g++ (7.1) and clang++ (xcode 9.0) with -std=c++11 -Wall and get the result:

g++

0x10052c050
0x10052c040
0x10052c040

clang++

0x108b74024
0x108b74018
0x108b74018

It means that the extern int a[]; and static int a[3]; declares same entity and have the same linkage (internal linkage).

//a.cpp
#include <stdio.h>
int a[3];
void f()
{
    printf("%p\n", (void*)a);
};
//b.cpp
extern void f();
static int a[3];
void g()
{
    printf("%p\n", (void*)a);
    extern int a[];
    printf("%p\n", (void*)a);
}
int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    f();
    g();
    return 0;
}

but, in C++11 [3.9/6]:

... The declared type of an array object might be an array of unknown size and therefore be incomplete at one point in a translation unit and complete later on; the array types at those two points (“array of unknown bound of T” and “array of N T”) are different types. ...

int a[3]; and int a[]; are different types,

In C++11 [3.5/6]:

If there is a visible declaration of an entity with linkage having the same name and type, ignoring entities declared outside the innermost enclosing namespace scope, the block scope declaration declares that same entity and receives the linkage of the previous declaration. If there is more than one such matching entity, the program is ill-formed. Otherwise, if no matching entity is found, the block scope entity receives external linkage.

"having the same name and type“ not compatible, so extern int a[]; shall not receives the linkage of the previous declaration(static int a[3];), and so, "Otherwise, if no matching entity is found, the block scope entity receives external linkage." is compatible.

My question is:

  • Why the result of the compiler is not consistent with the C++11 standard wording?
  • Or if my understanding is wrong, what's right?

Note: this question is different from error: extern declaration of 'i' follows declaration with no linkage

  • Maybe since a is odr-used with an incomplete type, so the program is ill-formed; no diagnostic required, thus has the strange behavior? – xskxzr Dec 16 '17 at 9:37
  • @xskxzr yes, I have edited it, Thank you. – chenfuxing Dec 16 '17 at 11:44
0

"extern int a[]" does not FULLY define "a".

Updated after @Bob__ 's comment to my original post.

I get the same results on all three compilers I tried (up to change in pointer addresses) - thanks, @Bob__ . Since all of them are compiling should we say it is the language of the standard that needs updating?

  • @Shankar: "Since all of them are compiling should we say it is the language of the standard that needs updating?" Well the issue is, what does the standard actually say should happen here? Are there any other standards paragraphs that are relevant? Is the standard saying what committee intends it to say in regards to this program, or is this a defect in the standard? It's entirely possible that all 3 compilers are wrong according to the current wording of standard, and all 3 compilers should be patched, without a defect resolution for the standard. – Chris Beck Dec 16 '17 at 19:30
0

From the formal standpoint, the words that you missed are

the array types at those two points (“array of unknown bound of T” and “array of N T”) are different types.

It does not say

the array types (“array of unknown bound of T” and “array of N T”) are different types.

So basically both a declarations in your example are of an array type.

If this does not sound too convincing, then, IMHO, block scope extern declarations are not the most popular feature in the standard. For example, see this there the compilers implement totally different behavior than it is stated C++11,14,17 standards. And eventually in C++17 it is considered to be ill-formed to have an entity with both internal and external linkage for this case (that is not yet implemented by the compilers).

Second, from the practical standpoint, it feels like a name clash: you want to have two objects with static storage duration with the same name in the same scope. Why would you do that, what is practical goal that you achieve by this, even if that was possible, that would be super confusing for the code readability? Why not just name your internal static storage duration variable to something different from the external one?

Sorry that my post does not give a straight away answer, rather asks more question. Thank you for bringing an interesting case showing that the standard could be more clear on some points.

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