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I have a simple scene in WebGL where i store every transformation (for the camera and the models) in a single model/view matrix and i set them by rotating and moving said matrix.

What i want is, to being able to rotate the camera around and when i "move forward" to move towards where the camera is pointing.

So far, i have modified this code to this:

    mat4.identity(mvMatrix);    
    mat4.rotateX(mvMatrix, degToRad(elev), mvMatrix);   
    mat4.rotateY(mvMatrix, degToRad(ang), mvMatrix);   
    mat4.rotateZ(mvMatrix, degToRad(-roll), mvMatrix);  
    mat4.translate(mvMatrix, [-px, -py, -pz], mvMatrix);

since it wasn't working as it was and it kind of works, until you do an extreme rotation (more than 90 degrees).

This is not a deal breaker for what i'm doing, but i want to know. Is this the best i can get without moving away from calculating the camera orientation like this?

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WebGL cameras generally point down the -Z axis so to move in the direction the camera is facing you just add the camera's Z axis (elements 8, 9, 10) to the position of the camera multiplied by some velocity.

const m4 = twgl.m4;
const v3 = twgl.v3;
const gl = document.querySelector("canvas").getContext("webgl");
const vs = `
uniform mat4 u_worldViewProjection;
uniform mat4 u_worldInverseTranspose;

attribute vec4 position;
attribute vec3 normal;

varying vec3 v_normal;

void main() {
  gl_Position = u_worldViewProjection * position;
  v_normal = (u_worldInverseTranspose * vec4(normal, 0)).xyz;
}
`;
const fs = `
precision mediump float;

varying vec3 v_normal;
uniform vec3 u_lightDir;
uniform vec4 u_color;

void main() {
  vec3 norm = normalize(v_normal);
  float light = dot(u_lightDir, norm) * .5 + .5;
  gl_FragColor = vec4(u_color.rgb * light, u_color.a);
}
`;

const progInfo = twgl.createProgramInfo(gl, [vs, fs]);
const bufferInfo = twgl.primitives.createCubeBufferInfo(gl, 1);

const projection = m4.identity();
const camera = m4.identity();
const view = m4.identity();
const viewProjection = m4.identity();
const world = m4.identity();
const worldViewProjection = m4.identity();
const worldInverse = m4.identity();
const worldInverseTranspose = m4.identity();

const fov = degToRad(90);
const zNear = 0.1;
const zFar = 100;

const lightDir = v3.normalize([1, 2, 3]);

const keys = {};

let px = 0;
let py = 0;
let pz = 0;
let elev = 0;
let ang = 0;
let roll = 0;
const speed = 1;
const turnSpeed = 90;

let then = 0;
function render(now) {
  now *= 0.001;  // seconds;
  const deltaTime = now - then;
  then = now;
  
  twgl.resizeCanvasToDisplaySize(gl.canvas);
  gl.viewport(0, 0, gl.canvas.width, gl.canvas.height);
  
  gl.enable(gl.DEPTH_TEST);
  gl.enable(gl.CULL_FACE);
  
  gl.useProgram(progInfo.program);
  
  const aspect = gl.canvas.clientWidth / gl.canvas.clientHeight;
  m4.perspective(fov, aspect, zNear, zFar, projection);

  m4.identity(camera);    
  m4.translate(camera, [px, py, pz], camera);
  m4.rotateX(camera, degToRad(elev), camera);   
  m4.rotateY(camera, degToRad(-ang), camera);   
  m4.rotateZ(camera, degToRad(roll), camera);
  
  m4.inverse(camera, view);

  m4.multiply(projection, view, viewProjection);
  
  for (let z = -1; z <= 1; ++z) {
    for (let y = -1; y <= 1; ++y) {
      for (let x = -1; x <= 1; ++x) {
        if (x === 0 && y === 0 && z === 0) {
          continue;
        }
        
        m4.identity(world);
        m4.translate(world, [x * 3, y * 3, z * 3], world);
        
        m4.multiply(viewProjection, world, worldViewProjection);
        m4.inverse(world, worldInverse);
        m4.transpose(worldInverse, worldInverseTranspose);
        
        twgl.setBuffersAndAttributes(gl, progInfo, bufferInfo);
        twgl.setUniforms(progInfo, {
          u_worldViewProjection: worldViewProjection,
          u_worldInverseTranspose: worldInverseTranspose,
          u_color: [(x + 2) / 3, (y + 2) / 3, (z + 2) / 3, 1],
          u_lightDir: lightDir,
        });
        twgl.drawBufferInfo(gl, bufferInfo);
      }
    }
  }
  
  if (keys['87'] || keys['83']) {
    const direction = keys['87'] ? 1 : -1;
    px -= camera[ 8] * deltaTime * speed * direction;
    py -= camera[ 9] * deltaTime * speed * direction;
    pz -= camera[10] * deltaTime * speed * direction;
  }
  
  if (keys['65'] || keys['68']) {
    const direction = keys['65'] ? 1 : -1;
    ang += deltaTime * turnSpeed * direction;
  }

  if (keys['81'] || keys['69']) {
    const direction = keys['81'] ? 1 : -1;
    roll += deltaTime * turnSpeed * direction;
  }

  if (keys['38'] || keys['40']) {
    const direction = keys['38'] ? 1 : -1;
    elev += deltaTime * turnSpeed * direction;
  }

  requestAnimationFrame(render);
}
requestAnimationFrame(render);

window.addEventListener('keydown', (e) => {
  keys[e.keyCode] = true;
  e.preventDefault();
});
window.addEventListener('keyup', (e) => {
  keys[e.keyCode] = false;
  e.preventDefault();
});

function degToRad(d) {
  return d * Math.PI / 180;
}
body { margin: 0; }
canvas { width: 100vw; height: 100vh; display: block; }
pre { position: absolute; left: 1em; top: 0; }
<script src="https://twgljs.org/dist/4.x/twgl-full.min.js"></script>
<canvas></canvas>
<pre>
A = left
D = right
W = forward
S = down
Q = roll left
E = roll right
UP = look up
DN = look down
</pre>

| improve this answer | |
  • Hey gman, thanks a lot this is much better. i have one more question, just to see if i understand this correctly, because i tried something like this before. – George Daskalakis Dec 17 '17 at 7:19
  • When we rotate the camera we actually rotate the scene around the camera, so when we move forward, we want to move along the default Z axis ([0, 0, 1]). What you do, by adding the Z component of the camera matrix to the translation is "cancel" the rotation. Is that correct? – George Daskalakis Dec 17 '17 at 7:28
  • Cameras are confusing. For me, the camera is something I place in the world. If you're in Unity or Maya or Blender you can see a camera icon in the scene. That camera exists in the scene itself. Its world matrix can be computed. The camera looks down its -Z axis. From the camera's world matrix you create a view matrix by taking the inverse of the camera matrix. The view matrix moves everything else relative to the camera so that the camera's position ends up being at the origin. See this article. – gman Dec 18 '17 at 7:06

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