32

How do I search a text file for a key-phrase or keyword and then print the line that key-phrase or keyword is in?

58
searchfile = open("file.txt", "r")
for line in searchfile:
    if "searchphrase" in line: print line
searchfile.close()

To print out multiple lines (in a simple way)

f = open("file.txt", "r")
searchlines = f.readlines()
f.close()
for i, line in enumerate(searchlines):
    if "searchphrase" in line: 
        for l in searchlines[i:i+3]: print l,
        print

The comma in print l, prevents extra spaces from appearing in the output; the trailing print statement demarcates results from different lines.

Or better yet (stealing back from Mark Ransom):

with open("file.txt", "r") as f:
    searchlines = f.readlines()
for i, line in enumerate(searchlines):
    if "searchphrase" in line: 
        for l in searchlines[i:i+3]: print l,
        print
  • 2
    close the file after processing. – Rozuur Jan 24 '11 at 18:00
  • 2
    How would I print that line and three other lines below it? – Noah R Jan 24 '11 at 18:02
  • senderle, before I accept your answer can you, or someone else, explain how I would print three lines below the searched line as well? – Noah R Jan 24 '11 at 18:09
  • file.readlines() is not very efficient for large files. use file.read() instead – ekta Dec 19 '13 at 9:31
  • @ekta, the OP asked for line numbers, so the data will have to be broken into lines somehow. What in your opinion would do so more efficiently than readlines? – senderle Dec 19 '13 at 9:37
21
with open('file.txt', 'r') as searchfile:
    for line in searchfile:
        if 'searchphrase' in line:
            print line

With apologies to senderle who I blatantly copied.

  • 2
    +1. I was annoyed -- but then I took a moment to understand the with statement. This is great! – senderle Jan 26 '11 at 3:02
  • 3
    @senderle, thanks for that. I considered just editing your answer, but I thought that would be even more annoying - and the with statement is a rather recent addition to Python, making your answer the most appropriate for some people. You got my +1 long ago! – Mark Ransom Jan 26 '11 at 4:14
  • 1
    yes, a recent and to me, cryptic, addition, until just now; I have to admit that I had struggled to grok the with statement a few weeks ago and had come up blank -- but this simple example explains it perfectly. – senderle Jan 26 '11 at 4:47
  • 4
    Nice. For others just stumbling on this, this method automatically closes the file afterwards. There's a good explanation at effbot.org: Understanding Python's "with" statement – naught101 Jul 30 '12 at 2:08
2

Note the potential for an out-of-range index with "i+3". You could do something like:

with open("file.txt", "r") as f:
    searchlines = f.readlines()
j=len(searchlines)-1
for i, line in enumerate(searchlines):
    if "searchphrase" in line: 
        k=min(i+3,j)
        for l in searchlines[i:k]: print l,
        print

Edit: maybe not necessary. I just tested some examples. x[y] will give errors if y is out of range, but x[y:z] doesn't seem to give errors for out of range values of y and z.

  • Slicing doesn't produce out of range errors. When you take a slice, you say "give me a list of the items in this range." If there are no items in the given range, then an empty list delivers what was asked for. On the other hand, indexing says "give me the exact item at index i." If there is no item at i, then returning something -- even None -- would be a lie, so it's better to raise an exception. – senderle Aug 8 '13 at 20:18

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