2

Was reading through this while researching XSD Validation. Came across this piece of code.

private static IEnumerable<ValidationEventArgs> RunValidation(string inputXml, bool includeHelperSchema)
{
    var schemaSet = new XmlSchemaSet();
    schemaSet.Add(schemaUnderTest);

    if (includeHelperSchema)
    {
        schemaSet.Add(helperSchema);
    }

    var readerSettings = new XmlReaderSettings()
    {
        Schemas = schemaSet,
        ValidationType = ValidationType.Schema,
        ValidationFlags = XmlSchemaValidationFlags.ReportValidationWarnings,
    };

    var events = new List<ValidationEventArgs>();
    readerSettings.ValidationEventHandler += (s, e) => { events.Add(e); };

    using (var reader = XmlReader.Create(new StringReader(inputXml), readerSettings))
    {
        while (reader.Read())
            ;
    }

    return events;
}

Could someone please explain to me what is the purpose of the semicolon being placed here?

while (reader.Read())
        ;

Removing gives an error "Invalid expression term '}' ; expected".

  • 1
    Please point out line. – mmushtaq Dec 18 '17 at 4:48
  • Updated the question – Akshatha Dec 18 '17 at 5:00
4

Let's look at documentation, where while keyword defined:

while_statement
    : 'while' '(' boolean_expression ')' embedded_statement
    ;

As you see, while statement must end with ;. So, if embedded_statement is empty, you'll get:

while (boolean_expression)
    ;

instead of:

while (boolean_expression)
    embedded_statement
    ;

embedded_statement can be one line expression like Console.WriteLine() or a block of code in { } braces:

while (boolean_expression)
{
    embedded_statement
}
;

Here, ; is not necessary, you can write simple:

while (boolean_expression)
{
    embedded_statement
}
  • Thank you. Didn't know that it was required to end it that way since I've always been accustomed to use while (boolean_expression) { embedded_statement }. +1 for the link provided. – Akshatha Dec 18 '17 at 5:02
0

Put the body for while loop

    while(reader.Read()){ 
    // your code there
    }
0
while (reader.Read());

The semicolon is just causing the while loop to continually evaluate reader.Read() until it returns false

Another way to write this could be

var result = reader.Read()
while (result)
{
   result = reader.Read();
}

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