3

I'm looking to support multiple themes in my app - moreover, I want to be able to dynamically change themes, either by changing a class on the body element, or even have different parts of the app use different themes.

In my previous project, I did it by adding explicit rules every time I need to use a theme-specific variable:

.theme-light & { background-color: @theme-light-background; }
.theme-dark & { background-color: @theme-dark-background; }

However, that approach does not scale well and adds unnecessary bloat to source files.

Now, I'm looking for a more automated approach for this. I.e. the following

.button {
  border-radius: 4px;
  background-color: @ui-background;
  color: @ui-foreground;
  border: 1px solid mix(@ui-background, @ui-foreground, 50%);
}

would turn into something like

.button {
  border-radius: 4px;
  border: 1px solid #808080;
    /* normally we wouldn't expect this to appear here, but in our case
    both themes have the same border color so we can't tell the difference */
}
.theme-light .button {
  background-color: #fff;
  color: #000;
}
.theme-dark .button {
  background-color: #000;
  color: #fff;
}

As far as I can tell, neither LESS nor SASS can do this in a natural way. It seems that it wouldn't be too difficult to implement it as a separate post-processor, that builds stylesheets for every theme, then compares them and scopes the differences into the corresponding "namespaces". I suspect that something like this might already exist, but I can't find anything.

Any suggestions?

  • See stackoverflow.com/questions/25875846, stackoverflow.com/questions/23551080, stackoverflow.com/questions/32676764, etc. And please, don't add both Less and Sass tags for the same question - this does not make any sense. – seven-phases-max Dec 18 '17 at 18:29
  • 1
    Thanks for the links; why not add both? If I haven't decided which processor to use, if there was a convenient implementation of this feature for one of them, it could influence my decision. – riv Dec 18 '17 at 20:47
  • ecause it could only be one accepted answer. Same way you don't put fortran, c++, javascript, php, whatever else (notice all of them also can generate CSS) tag into an arbitrary Q. – seven-phases-max Dec 18 '17 at 21:59
  • Either way as a user I have a strictly opposite vision of your approach above. Imagine you have 18 themes, now (yet again as a user) assuming I will be really using the only theme for a page at once I won't very happy for my browser downloading one huge css containing all of 18 themes and then traversing through all of them when rendering. 18 themes -> 18 different css -> <link switch> would be the most optimal/lightweight solution for most of use cases. – seven-phases-max Dec 18 '17 at 22:03
6

Not sure about Less, but in Sass it can be implemented relatively easy by storing theme information into maps and using ability to pass content blocks into mixins using @content. Here is example of how it may look like, quite fast solution but you can get an idea:

// Themes definition
//  - First level keys are theme names (also used to construct theme class names)
//  - Second level keys are theme settings, can be referred as theme(key)
$themes: (
    light: (
        background: #fff,
        foreground: #000,
    ),
    dark: (
        background: #000,
        foreground: #fff,
    ),
);

// Internal variable, just ignore 
$_current-theme: null;

// Function to refer to theme setting by name
// 
// @param string $name  Name of the theme setting to use
// @return mixed
@function theme($name) {
    @if ($_current-theme == null) {
        @error "theme() function should only be used into code that is wrapped by 'theme' mixin";
    }
    @if (not map-has-key(map-get($themes, $_current-theme), $name)) {
        @warn "Unknown theme key '#{$name}' for theme '#{$_current-theme}'";
        @return null;
    }
    @return map-get(map-get($themes, $_current-theme), $name);
}

// Theming application mixin, themable piece of style should be wrapped by call to this mixin 
@mixin theme() {
    @each $theme in map-keys($themes) {
        $_current-theme: $theme !global;
        .theme-#{$theme} & {
            @content;
        }
    }
    $_current-theme: null !global;
}

.button {
    border-radius: 4px;
    @include theme() {
        background-color: theme(background);
        color: theme(foreground);
    }
}

This piece of code will give you this result:

.button {
  border-radius: 4px;
}
.theme-light .button {
  background-color: #fff;
  color: #000;
}
.theme-dark .button {
  background-color: #000;
  color: #fff;
}

Looks pretty close to what you're trying to achieve. You can play with this snippet at Sassmeister.

  • Ah thanks, didn't think of using functions inside mixin content. I might still try to look for a post-processing solution for better readability, though. – riv Dec 18 '17 at 20:51

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.