12

I'm learning lambda expressions in Java 8. Can somebody explain to me how to use lambda expression with an abstract class having only one method (if it's possible)?

For example, this is the abstract class:

public abstract class ClassA {

    public abstract void action();

}

And I have another class that take's in its constructor an instance of ClassA:

public ClassB {
   public ClassB(String text, ClassA a){
      //Do stuff
    }
}

So I was wondering how to write something like this:

ClassB b = new ClassB("Example", new ClassA(() -> System.out.println("Hello")));

Obviously that statement doesn't work, but is there a way to use a lambda expression here or not? If there is, what am I doing wrong?

14
0

No, you cannot achieve this because ClassA must be a functional interface. A functional interface is an interface that contains exactly one abstract method. It may contain zero or more default methods and/or static methods in addition to the abstract method. Because a functional interface contains exactly one abstract method, you can omit the name of that method when you implement it using a lambda expression. For example, consider the following interface:

interface Predicate<T> {
    boolean test(T t);
}

The purpose of this interface is to provide a method that operates on an object of class T and return a boolean. You could have a method that takes an instance of class that implements this interface defined like this:

public void printImportantData(ArrayList<Data> dataList, Predicate<Data> p) {
    for (Data d : dataList) {
        if (p.test(d)) {
            System.out.println(d);
        }
    }
}

where Data class could be as simple as:

public class Data {
    public int value;
}

Now, you can call the above method as follows:

 printImportantData(al, (Data d) -> { return d.value > 1; }); 

Notice the method does not have a name here. This is possible because the interface has only one abstract method so the compiler can figure out the name. This can be shortened to:

printImportantData(al, (Data d) -> d.value > 1);

Notice that here are no curly brackets and no return keyword. This is possible because the method returns a boolean and the expression d.value > 1 also returns a boolean. The compiler is therefore able to figure out that the value of this expression is to be returned from the method. This can be shortened even more to:

printImportantData(al, d -> d.value > 1);

Notice that there is no type declaration of d! The compiler can figure out all information it needs because the interface has only one abstract method and that method has only one parameter. So you don't need to write all those things in your code.
Compare the above approach to the old Java 7 style using an inner class that does effectively the same thing:

printImportantData(al, new Predicate<Data>() {
    public boolean test(Data d) {
        return d.value > 1;
    }
});
| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you for your answer. So I will use an interface in that case if ClassA is an interface with only one parameter I can use the lambda. ;) – navy1978 Dec 18 '17 at 18:35
  • You're welcome! Yes, as a functional interface. Cheers! – Alex Mamo Dec 18 '17 at 18:51
  • reading the answer to the question I marked my answer as "duplicate of " : stackoverflow.com/questions/34424410/… I'm a little bit confused now, apparently you can use Lambda even with normal classes and not only with functional interface, is that true? – navy1978 Dec 19 '17 at 7:50
  • 1
    @navy1978 There is an example in that answer regarding Runnable. As we see, this is also a functional interface and not an bastract class. It has exact one abstract method, run(). In my opinion it's not an correct example. – Alex Mamo Dec 19 '17 at 9:46
4
0

You can only instantiate a functional interface with a lambda expression.

For example:

If you change ClassA to be an interface (you'd probably want to rename it):

public interface ClassA {
    public abstract void action();
}

and keep ClassB as is:

public class ClassB {
   public ClassB(String text, ClassA a){
      //Do stuff
    }
}

You can pass an instance of (the interface) ClassA to the ClassB constructor with:

ClassB b = new ClassB("Example", () -> System.out.println("Hello"));    

On the other hand, your

ClassB b = new ClassB("Example", new ClassA(() -> System.out.println("Hello")));

attempt fails due to several reasons:

  1. You can't instantiate an abstract class (you can only instantiate sub-classes of that class).
  2. Even if you could instantiate class ClassA (if it wasn't abstract), your ClassA has no constructor that takes some functional interface as an argument, so you can't pass () -> System.out.println("Hello") as an argument to ClassA's constructor.
| improve this answer | |
  • The first point is wrong : "You cannot instantiate an abstract class" because you cannot even instantiate an interface, but with an inner class you can do both. I gave you +1 in any case because your answer for the rest is correct. – navy1978 Dec 19 '17 at 7:32
  • What's wrong with the statement "You cannot instantiate an abstract class"? "but with an inner class you can do both" - by "inner class" do you mean anonymous class instance? That would be an instance of a sub-class of the abstract class. The OP is not creating an anonymous class instance in their failed attempt. They attempt to create an instance of the abstract class itself, which is not possible. @navy1978 – Eran Dec 19 '17 at 7:37
  • Yes I was referring to anonymous class, sorry, just woke up... Not clear to me why you pointed out that using abstract class is different from using an interface in my case, I just think it's just a matter of implementing the Lambda, because it could be implemented to manage the Abstract classes as well. from my point of view using anonymous classes you can instantiate an interface or an abstract class. I don't see your point, sorry... – navy1978 Dec 19 '17 at 7:43
  • I would add that if lambda was made to use Abstract classes as well what you wrote : "ClassB b = new ClassB("Example", () -> System.out.println("Hello"));" would be the correct way to use it in both the cases... – navy1978 Dec 19 '17 at 7:46
  • 1
    @navy1978 the answer in that question creates an instance of a concrete class - it's called AbstractLambda but it's not abstract. And the lambda expression is passed as a parameter to the constructor, as an implementation of a functional interface - Supplier. – Eran Dec 19 '17 at 8:03
1
0

Well, you could change your classes to be able to write something along these lines:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    ClassB b = new ClassB("Example", new ClassA(() -> System.out.println("Hello")) {

        @Override
        public void action() {

        }
    });
}

But for this you would need to change the constructor of ClassA to accept some implementation of a functional interface, like java.lang.Runnable:

public abstract class ClassA {

    public ClassA(Runnable runnable) {
        runnable.run();
    }

    public abstract void action();

}

class ClassB {
    public ClassB(String text, ClassA a) {
        //Do stuff
    }
}

Of course you still need to implement the abstract method in ClassA, see the example above.

| improve this answer | |

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.