5

I'm using chai-as-promised to test some promises. My issue is I'm not sure how to have multiple expect statements in a single test. In order for the expect().to.be.fulfilled to work properly, I need to return it, like this:

it('test', () => {
  return expect(promise).to.be.fulfilled
}

... or to use notify, like this:

it('test', (done) => {
  expect(promise).to.be.fulfilled.notify(done)
}

The issue comes when I have another thing I need to check, such as that a certain function gets called, like this:

it('test', (done) => {
  var promise = doSomething()
  expect(sinon_function_spy.callCount).to.equal(1)
  expect(promise).to.be.fulfilled.notify(done)
})

The problem here is that, because doSomething() is asynchronous, the call to sinon_function_spy may not have occurred yet when I call that expect, making this test flaky. If I use a then, like this:

it('test', (done) => {
  var promise = doSomething()
  promise.then(() => {
    expect(sinon_function_spy.callCount).to.equal(1)
  })
  expect(promise).to.be.fulfilled.notify(done)
})

Then the test technically passes and fails as expected, but it will fail because the promise gets rejected, due to the thrown exception in the then call. Similarly, if I have a case where the promise is expected to reject:

it('test', (done) => {
  var promise = doSomething()
  promise.then(() => {
    expect(sinon_function_spy.callCount).to.equal(1)
  })
  expect(promise).to.be.rejected.notify(done)
})

Then the check on the sinon_function_spy never gets called, since the promise was rejected and doesn't call then.

How can I get both expect statements to reliably execute and return the correct values?

  • Mocha uses exceptions or promise rejections to report failures. Even with synchronous assertions, if the first fails, the rest of the assertions are not run. I don't think that mocha really supports performing assertions after a failure. Is there a reason you need both assertions to execute? – Jacob Dec 18 '17 at 21:35
  • yes. I need to check that both things happened for the test case to succeed. If the promise resolved as expected, but the function did not get called, the test case shouldn't pass. – ewok Dec 18 '17 at 21:36
1

In the case of wanting to assert that the Promise is fulfilled and a call was performed as expected, you don't really need that first part as an assertion. The mocha test case itself will fail if the Promise rejects as long as you are returning it:

it('test', () => {
  return doSomething()
    .then(() => {
      expect(sinon_function_spy.callCount).to.equal(1)
    });
});

If the Promise returned by doSomething() rejects, so will the test case. If the expect assertion fails, it will also fail the test case with that failed assertion. If you want to be a bit more explicit:

it('test', () => {
  return doSomething()
    .then(() => {
      expect(sinon_function_spy.callCount).to.equal(1)
    }, err => {
      expect(err).to.not.exist;
    });
});

...you can catch the error. Note that with this flavor of then with two callbacks, the assertion failing in the first callback will not reach the second callback, so it'll just be Mocha that sees the failed assertion.

Here's how you can do an expected failed Promise:

it('test', () => {
  return doSomething()
    .then(() => {
      throw new Error('Promise should not have resolved');
    }, err => {
      expect(err).to.exist;
      expect(sinon_function_spy.callCount).to.equal(1)
    });
})
  • 1
    chai-as-promised is great for some scenarios, but I find there are lots of cases where it's just easier to use Promises than to try to formulate a test to use chai-as-promised. – Jacob Dec 18 '17 at 21:53
2

If you're using mocha or jest as your test framework you can return the promise with expectations in your then() block:

it('test', () => {
   return doSomething().then( () => {
     expect(sinon_function_spy.callCount).to.equal(1);
   });
});

This test won't end until the promise successfully completes AND the expect has been run. If you're using jasmine you can use the jasmine-promises package to get the same functionality.

For the reverse case, I'd recommend creating a wrapper that reverse the polarity of the promise:

function reverse( promise ) {
   //use a single then block to avoid issues with both callbacks triggering
   return promise.then(
       () => { throw new Error("Promise should not succeed"); }
       e => e; //resolves the promise with the rejection error
   );
}

Now you can do

it('test', () => {
   return reverse( doSomethingWrong() ).then( error => {
       expect( error.message ).to.equal("Oh no");
   });
});
  • That works if I expect the promise to resolve. what if my test case expects the promise to reject? returning the promise itself will cause mocha to register the test case as a failure. – ewok Dec 18 '17 at 21:17
  • I've updated my answer to provide a suggestion. – Duncan Thacker Dec 18 '17 at 21:25
1

A way to achieve multiple expects

it('should fail if no auth', () => {
    const promise = chai.request(server).get('/albums');
    return expect(promise).to.be.rejected.then(() => {
      return promise.catch(err => {
        expect(err).not.to.be.null;
        expect(err.response).to.have.status(401);
        expect(err.response).to.be.a.json;
      });
   });
});

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