5

I'm designing our APIs to take concrete query objects as a single parameter as opposed to exploding out the signatures of all the places where the parameters can be passed.

For instance, rather than writing this...

func someQuery(requiredA:Bool, requiredB:Int, requiredC:String, defaultedA:Bool = false, defaultedB:Int = 1, defaultedC:String = "X", optionalA:Bool? = nil, optionalB:Int? = nil, optionalC:String? = nil){
    ....
}

I'm writing this...

func someQuery(queryParams:QueryParams){
    ....
}

And I'm defining (partially--more below) the query object like this...;

struct QueryObject{
    let requiredA  : Bool
    let requiredB  : Int
    let requiredC  : String
    let defaultedA : Bool
    let defaultedB : Int
    let defaultedC : String
    let optionalA  : Bool?
    let optionalB  : Int?
    let optionalC  : String?
}

As I'm sure you can tell from the names, for this example, some are required, some have defaults and some are completely optional.

Now as for defining the QueryParams object, I'm trying to make it so when they are creating it, a user only has to specify the required parameters, and can optionally specify the others as they need/see fit.

Here's what I'm after...

// At a minimum
let queryParams = QueryParams(requiredA:true, requiredB:1, requiredC:"x")

// Minimums overriding a default
let queryParams = QueryParams(requiredA:true, requiredB:1, requiredC:"x", defaultC:"y")

// Minimums plus an optional, still picking up all defaults
let queryParams = QueryParams(requiredA:true, requiredB:1, requiredC:"x", optionalB:8)

To achieve this, I have created my own initializer that does nothing but internally assigns the parameters, like so...

struct QueryParams{

    init(
        requiredA  : Bool,
        requiredB  : Int,
        requiredC  : String,
        defaultedA : Bool    = true,
        defaultedB : Int     = 1,
        defaultedC : String  = "x",
        optionalA  : Bool?   = nil,
        optionalB  : Int?    = nil,
        optionalC  : String? = nil
    ){
        self.requiredA  = requiredA
        self.requiredB  = requiredB
        self.requiredC  = requiredC
        self.defaultedA = defaultedA
        self.defaultedB = defaultedB
        self.defaultedC = defaultedC
        self.optionalA  = optionalA
        self.optionalB  = optionalB
        self.optionalC  = optionalC
    }

    let requiredA  : Bool
    let requiredB  : Int
    let requiredC  : String
    let defaultedA : Bool
    let defaultedB : Int
    let defaultedC : String
    let optionalA  : Bool?
    let optionalB  : Int?
    let optionalC  : String?
}

...which seems like a LOT of boilerplate code. I'm trying to find out if there's any way to leverage Swift's creation of a struct's default initializer so I don't have to write all of that out manually.

Of note:

  1. I'm selecting structs here because Swift gives them a default initializers whereas Classes AFAIK do not get that.
  2. Obviously, the required parameters would have to come first. Other than that, it doesn't matter (although it's fine if they have to be in definition-order too. Point is I don't care.)
  3. The member variables can be let or var. I just use let as a habit.

So... can this code be simplified/reduced/eliminated?

1
  • 1
    Edited. Feel free to do the same for things like this. That's what I do. Dec 19 '17 at 1:03
0

You aren't able to get that kind of control from the default initializer on it's own. In terms of the least amount of code, I would recommend something like this.

struct QueryParams{

    let requiredA  : Bool
    let requiredB  : Int
    let requiredC  : String
    var defaultedA : Bool = true
    var defaultedB : Int = 1
    var defaultedC : String = "x"
    var optionalA  : Bool? = nil
    var optionalB  : Int? = nil
    var optionalC  : String? = nil
}

extension QueryParams {
    init(
        requiredA  : Bool,
        requiredB  : Int,
        requiredC  : String
        ){
        self.requiredA  = requiredA
        self.requiredB  = requiredB
        self.requiredC  = requiredC
    }
}

By putting your custom initializer in an extension, you keep the default initializer for free. The only problem is if they only want to customize some of the non-required properties, which they will need to do after initialization.

3
  • True, but what point is there in keeping the default initializer if it forces you to specify everything? And if you have to write an initializer anyway, then you may as well flesh it out to handle all cases using the defaults, and if you do that, then then there's no need for the default initializer anyway. Plus, the other benefit of a full-on initializer is everything can be made into a Let. I was just hoping there was some way to do this automatically, but I'm starting to think there isn't. Dec 19 '17 at 15:23
  • Your points are valid. In my opinion, you should go with what you were doing even if it seems like a lot of boilerplate. This is just a way to get the most flexibility with the least amount of code based on what you were looking for. Unfortunately, what you are exactly looking for isn't available. It's too bad it can't detect default values and adjust the default initializer accordingly.
    – JustinM
    Dec 19 '17 at 16:00
  • Agree completely. There's always Swift 5! :) Thanks again! Dec 19 '17 at 16:35

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