7

How can I add a trailing comma after every element of an array for making a list like:

INV, INV, INV, INV

Note that the last element doesn't have a trailing comma

Currently iterating the list with array.map:

var List = React.createClass({
  render: function() {
    return (
      <div>
        {this.props.data.map(function(item) {
          return <div>{item}</div>;
        })}
      </div>
    );
  }
});

var data = ["red", "green", "blue"];

React.render(<List data={data} />, document.body);
  • 1
    you need a string in return? – zabusa Dec 19 '17 at 7:19
  • 2
    You can try a simple hack: array.map((item, index) => (<div>{ (index ? ', ': '') + item}</div>)). What this will do is, check if index is valid, add a comma else blank string. And since 0 in JS is falsey, it will skip for 1st entry – Rajesh Dec 19 '17 at 7:20
  • 3
    arr.join(','); – Mohit Bhardwaj Dec 19 '17 at 7:20
  • @MohitBhardwaj Join will make it string and not Array<ReachNode> – Rajesh Dec 19 '17 at 7:21
  • 1
    data=data.map((x,i,arr)=>(i<arr.length-1)?x+',':x) – vibhor1997a Dec 19 '17 at 7:27
19

As commented you can use:

array.map((item, index) => ({ (index ? ', ': '') + item }))

Also, since you want to display text inline, using a div is not appropriate. Instead you can/should use an inline element like span

var List = React.createClass({
  render: function() {
    return (
      <div>
        {
          this.props.data.map(function(item, index) {
            return <span key={`demo_snap_${index}`}>{ (index ? ', ' : '') + item }</span>;
          })
        }
      </div>
    );
  }
});

var data = ["red", "green", "blue"];

ReactDOM.render(<List data={data} />, demo);
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>

<div id="demo"></div>

  • 1
    Remember to add a key={index} to the <span> or you'll get a warning in the console – James Love May 21 '18 at 14:09
5

Use the CSS adjacent sibling combinator (+) to add pseudo element (::before) with a comma to all sibling items, but the 1st:

var List = React.createClass({
  render: function() {
    return (
      <div>
        {this.props.data.map(function(item) {
          return <div className="item">{item}</div>;
        })}
      </div>
    );
  }
});

var data = ["red", "green", "blue"];

ReactDOM.render(<List data={data} />, demo);
.item {
  display: inline-block;
}

.item + .item::before {
  display: inline-block;
  white-space: pre;
  content: ", ";
}
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>

<div id="demo"></div>

  • Just an opinionated comment but I would prefer using JS instead. Also using a div and adding display: inline-block looks weird. – Rajesh Dec 19 '17 at 7:30
  • 1
    Why would you prefer JS in this case? – Ori Drori Dec 19 '17 at 7:30
  • I prefer keeping UI changes to CSS and such manipulation to JS. Again, this is just my preference/opinion. Yes using CSS would be more performant, but it might reduce readability. – Rajesh Dec 19 '17 at 7:32
  • I actually considers this a part of the design, thus fitting for CSS. Why would it reduce readability? I'm interested in knowing your opinion :) – Ori Drori Dec 19 '17 at 7:34
  • 2
    @Rajesh - your feeling is incorrect in this case :) Pseudo elements and content are indeed a grey area. The question is - are the commas part of the content itself, or are they part of the design? And you can answer it both ways. I'm not sure about readability though. On one hand it might be confusing - "where is the comma coming from?". On the hand it reduces noise in the JSX, and a short inspect will show you where it comes form. So, as you stated - a matter of opinion. – Ori Drori Dec 19 '17 at 7:51
2

What you can do is, check the index of item, if index is not equals to the last item render the , otherwise nothing.

Write it like this:

{
    this.props.data.map((item, i, arr) => <span>{item} {i != (arr.length-1) ? ',' : ''}</span>)
}

You can also store the total data length in a separate variable and instead of checking the arr.length in each iteration check with that variable.

Working example:

var List = React.createClass({
  render: function() {
    return (
      <div>
        {
	   this.props.data.map((item, i, arr) => <span>{item} {i != (arr.length-1) ? ', ' : ''}</span>)
        }
      </div>
    );
  }
});

var data = ["red", "green", "blue"];

ReactDOM.render(<List data={data} />, document.body);
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>

1

const data = ["red", "green", "blue"];

class List extends React.Component{
render(){
return( 
<div>
{this.props.data.map((item, index) => {
  return <span>{ (index ? ', ' : '') + item }</span>;
})}
</div>
)
}
}

ReactDOM.render(
<List data={data}/>,
document.getElementById('demo')
)
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/15.1.0/react-dom.min.js"></script>

<div id="demo"></div>

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