79
const cond = false

const extraInfo = [
  {
    a: 11,
    b: 25
  },
  {
    a: 12,
    b: 34
  },
  {
    a: 1,
    c: 99
  }
]

const userInfo = [
  {
    z: 8
  },
  {
    z: 10
  },
  ...(cond && extraInfo)
]

When cond is true, I want both extra and user info.

When cond is false, only userInfo is needed.

The issue is when cond is false, I get

TypeError: (intermediate value)(intermediate value)(intermediate value)[Symbol.iterator] is not a function

My understanding is that I am not allowed to use a boolean as a spread element, in this case ...false.

But ...( cond ? extraInfo : {} ) doesn't seem to work either.

What is going on?

5 Answers 5

172

Just make it

...(cond ? extraInfo : [])

Demo with true

var cond = true;

var extraInfo = [
  {
    a: 11,
    b: 25
  },
  {
    a: 12,
    b: 34
  },
  {
    a: 1,
    c: 99
  }
];

var userInfo = [
  {
    z: 8
  },
  {
    z: 10
  },
  ...(cond ? extraInfo : [])
];

console.log( userInfo );

Demo with false

var cond = false;

var extraInfo = [
  {
    a: 11,
    b: 25
  },
  {
    a: 12,
    b: 34
  },
  {
    a: 1,
    c: 99
  }
];

var userInfo = [
  {
    z: 8
  },
  {
    z: 10
  },
  ...(cond ? extraInfo : [])
];

console.log( userInfo );

8
  • can change the conditional operator to ...(cond && extraInfo || []) Commented Dec 19, 2017 at 8:33
  • Nice, but why!? If it accepts filled object why not empty one?
    – Akxe
    Commented Dec 19, 2017 at 8:33
  • 1
    Now it makes sense! So objects are not iterable without the [Symbol.iterator] protocol that's why ...{} wouldn't work?
    – Liren Yeo
    Commented Dec 19, 2017 at 8:34
  • @AswinRamesh That also works, thanks, I will add that as well. Commented Dec 19, 2017 at 8:34
  • 2
    @AswinRamesh No, don't do that. It's longer, more confusing, and works only if extraInfo is truthy.
    – Bergi
    Commented Dec 19, 2017 at 8:36
72

Conditionally spread an entity to Object

console.log(
  { 
    name: 'Alex',
    age: 19,
    ...(true && { city: 'Kyiv' }),
    ...(false && { country: 'Ukraine' })
  }
) 

// { name: 'Alex', age: 19, city: 'Kyiv' }

Conditionally spread an entity to Array


console.log(
  [
    'Dan',
    'Alex',
    ...(true ? ['Robin'] : [])
  ]
)

// [ 'Dan', 'Alex', 'Robin' ]

4
  • So, what is the actual difference between spreading into object vs array? When trying to spread into array, one gets Uncaught TypeError: boolean false is not iterable (cannot read property Symbol(Symbol.iterator)).
    – Qwerty
    Commented May 20, 2020 at 14:04
  • 2
    I didn't know this can be done. Really concise in certain use cases. Nice!
    – Daniel San
    Commented Aug 16, 2020 at 17:17
  • @Qwerty, the problem here, with the object, that is causing the TypeError, is that an expression like false && somethingElise will always return false, that is not spreadable. You need to use ternary opeator here too, with an empty object if false, similar to the array example. Commented Mar 5, 2022 at 14:01
  • that doesn't work while in an array of objects
    – ValerianTi
    Commented Feb 14 at 13:11
2

Another way:

cond is true:

var extraInfo = [
  {
    a: 11,
    b: 25
  },
  {
    a: 12,
    b: 34
  },
  {
    a: 1,
    c: 99
  }
]

var cond = true;
var userInfo = [
  {
    z: 8
  },
  {
    z: 10
  },
  ...(cond && extraInfo || [])
]
console.log(userInfo);

cond is false:

var extraInfo = [
  {
    a: 11,
    b: 25
  },
  {
    a: 12,
    b: 34
  },
  {
    a: 1,
    c: 99
  }
]

var cond = false;
var userInfo = [
  {
    z: 8
  },
  {
    z: 10
  },
  ...(cond && extraInfo || [])
]
console.log(userInfo);

5
  • 1
    Why not use a proper ternary operator?
    – Bergi
    Commented Dec 19, 2017 at 8:36
  • question of taste.
    – Faly
    Commented Dec 19, 2017 at 8:39
  • question of correctness, simplicity and performance. Of course you can have a horrible taste for them :-)
    – Bergi
    Commented Dec 19, 2017 at 8:39
  • Are you sure ternary operator is more performant ? If you cannot understand it, that doesn't mean that it's horible
    – Faly
    Commented Dec 19, 2017 at 8:47
  • Yes it is, because it does not have to evaluate the truthiness of the value returned by the cond && extraInfo expression. It's one operation, not two. (Also: write what you mean)
    – Bergi
    Commented Dec 19, 2017 at 8:49
1

const extraInfo = [
  {
    a: 11,
    b: 25
  },
  {
    a: 12,
    b: 34
  },
  {
    a: 1,
    c: 99
  }
];
const userInfo = [
  {
    z: 8
  },
  {
    z: 10
  },
];

const cond = true;
let getMyValue = cond ? [].concat(extraInfo, userInfo) : userInfo;

console.log(getMyValue)

-1
let getMyValue = cond ? [].concat(extraInfo, userInfo) : userInfo;

let check this

const extraInfo = [
  {
    a: 11,
    b: 25
  },
  {
    a: 12,
    b: 34
  },
  {
    a: 1,
    c: 99
  }
];
const userInfo = [
  {
    z: 8
  },
  {
    z: 10
  },
];

const cond = false;
let getMyValue = cond ? [].concat(extraInfo, userInfo) : userInfo;

console.log(getMyValue)

2
  • Whilst this may theoretically answer the question, it would be preferable to include the essential parts of the answer here, and provide the link for reference.
    – Mat
    Commented Dec 19, 2017 at 12:20
  • Hi, I place my ans like bottom of the section , no issues let's check this Commented Dec 19, 2017 at 12:31

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