11

I have created Lambda functions using AWS.Net SDK, .net core version 1.0. I want to implement dependency injection. Since lambda functions triggered and run independently in AWS environment, there is no such class like Startup present. How and Where can I configure my containers to achieve this implementation?

  • I honestly don't think this is possible. But I could be wrong. – Omar Himada Dec 19 '17 at 14:15
5

You can do this. Your FunctionHandler is your entry point to your application.. so you have to wire up the service collection from there.

public class Function
{
    public string FunctionHandler(string input, ILambdaContext context)
    {
        var serviceCollection = new ServiceCollection();
        ConfigureServices(serviceCollection);

        // create service provider
        var serviceProvider = serviceCollection.BuildServiceProvider();

        // entry to run app.
        return serviceProvider.GetService<App>().Run(input);
    }

    private static void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection serviceCollection)
    {
        // add dependencies here

        // here is where you're adding the actual application logic to the collection
        serviceCollection.AddTransient<App>();
    }
}

public class App
{
    // if you put a constructor here with arguments that are wired up in your services collection, they will be injected.

    public string Run(string input)
    {
        return "This is a test";
    }
}

If you want to wire up logging, have a look here: https://github.com/aws/aws-lambda-dotnet/tree/master/Libraries/src/Amazon.Lambda.Logging.AspNetCore

  • 2
    Helpful post @Donuts - thanks. In your example, it may help others to show how you execute "App::Run" from the ConfigureServices. e.g. serviceCollection.BuildServiceProvider().GetService<App>().Run() – Aaron Hudon Jun 13 '18 at 19:36
  • This is incorrect and dangerous. You will create a new service collection on each request. So your "Singletons" won't be actual singletons that are shared between requests. They will be singletons only in the scope of the request itself. And under heavy loads, if you use certain type of resources, it can have very big consequences. – Erndob Apr 26 at 9:20
3

While the FunctionHandler is indeed your entry point to your application, I would actually wire up your DI in a parameterless constructor. The constructor only ever gets called once, so this purely "setup" code should really only need to be called once. We just want to take advantage of using it in every subsequent invocation that gets routed to the same container.

public class Function
{
    private static ServiceProvider ServiceProvider { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// The parameterless constructor is what Lambda uses to construct your instance the first time.
    /// It will only ever be called once for the lifetime of the container that it's running on.
    /// We want to build our ServiceProvider once, and then use the same provider in all subsequent 
    /// Lambda invocations. This makes things like using local MemoryCache techniques viable (Just 
    /// remember that you can never count on a locally cached item to be there!)
    /// </summary>
    public Function()
    {
        var services = new ServiceCollection();
        ConfigureServices(services);
        ServiceProvider = services.BuildServiceProvider();
    }

    public async Task FunctionHandler(SQSEvent evnt, ILambdaContext context)
    {
        await ServiceProvider.GetService<App>().Run(evnt);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Configure whatever dependency injection you like here
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="services"></param>
    private static void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        // add dependencies here ex: Logging, IMemoryCache, Interface mapping to concrete class, etc...

        // add a hook to your class that will actually do the application logic
        services.AddTransient<App>();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Since we don't want to dispose of the ServiceProvider in the FunctionHandler, we will
    /// at least try to clean up after ourselves in the destructor for the class.
    /// </summary>
    ~Function()
    {
        ServiceProvider.Dispose();
    }
}

public class App
{
    public async Task Run(SQSEvent evnt)
    {
        // actual business logic goes here
        await Task.CompletedTask;
    }
}
  • Make the constructor static and this works. Now you have a static service provider that is shared between instances, but if AWS creates a new instance on the same micro-vm it will override the service collection again. – Erndob Apr 26 at 9:23
1

If you are talking about dependency injection of AWS Services for WebAPI it is possible if you use AspNetCoreWebAPI template via dotnet new lambda.AspNetCoreWebAPI or Visual Studio blueprints

This template has Startup class (of course each startup is executed once per lambda environment like you mentioned). You add add AWS services in ConfigureServices

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
  services.AddMvc();
  services.AddDefaultAWSOptions(Configuration.GetAWSOptions());
  // Add service to obtain in Controllers constructor
  services.AddAWSService<IAmazonDynamoDB>();
}

Then use the constructor for the dependency injection your Controller class

IAmazonDynamoDB client;
public ValuesController(IAmazonDynamoDB dbClient)
{
    this.client = dbClient;
}

These services are started with credentials retrieved from Environment variables, therefore make sure you include your AWS profile in appsettings.json. If you are not sure about appsettings.json or how to declare profiles according to the ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT leave a comment.

  • 1
    He's asking specifically on how to use DI in an AWS Lambda function, not in a dot net web api – c_breeez Apr 10 '18 at 15:37

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