47

What's the fastest and easiest to read implementation of calculating the sum of digits?

I.e. Given the number: 17463 = 1 + 7 + 4 + 6 + 3 = 21

18 Answers 18

112

You could do it arithmetically, without using a string:

sum = 0;
while (n != 0) {
    sum += n % 10;
    n /= 10;
}
12
  • Beat me to it. This is the best way.
    – mmcdole
    Jan 26, 2009 at 6:23
  • Personally, I see this better conceptually as a for loop... But maybe that's just my mind, I tend to see everything better as a for loop... Jan 26, 2009 at 8:04
  • 2
    @monoxide, the while loop is more succinct. You have no need for an index or for tight control of the loop iterations.
    – mmcdole
    Jan 26, 2009 at 10:26
  • 1
    +1: I love this code, it's very elegant. Not new to me, but very cool. Sep 7, 2011 at 7:22
  • 1
    This assumes that the n /= 10 will be truncated to an integer. For languages such as JavaScript, use something like n = Math.floor(n / 10)
    – caseyWebb
    Dec 9, 2017 at 4:46
49

I use

int result = 17463.ToString().Sum(c => c - '0');

It uses only 1 line of code.

9
  • 2
    Converting an integer to a string in order to sum it's values is not really very efficient. I also don't consider this code especially readable. Though I didn't downvote this.
    – Brian
    Jan 26, 2009 at 6:54
  • You forgot to convert the string to array first. 17463.ToString().ToCharArray().Sum(c => c - '0'); Jan 26, 2009 at 7:58
  • 8
    You don't have to convert it to an array first.
    – atsjoo
    Jan 26, 2009 at 7:59
  • Very nice and functional approach!
    – Martijn
    Mar 5, 2009 at 10:40
  • 3
    can you explain how this works? i don't understand the - '0' Nov 26, 2017 at 10:07
18

For integer numbers, Greg Hewgill has most of the answer, but forgets to account for the n < 0. The sum of the digits of -1234 should still be 10, not -10.

n = Math.Abs(n);
sum = 0;
while (n != 0) {
    sum += n % 10;
    n /= 10;
}

It the number is a floating point number, a different approach should be taken, and chaowman's solution will completely fail when it hits the decimal point.

1
  • 1
    Good catch. It all depends on how the modulo operator is defined in the language in question; in C# the result takes the same sign as the dividend which makes my method fail for negative numbers. In other languages it may work, see the table at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modulo_operation Jan 26, 2009 at 8:04
14
 public static int SumDigits(int value)
 {
     int sum = 0;
     while (value != 0)
     {
         int rem;
         value = Math.DivRem(value, 10, out rem);
         sum += rem;
     }
     return sum;
 }
5
  • Assuming DivRem does the intelligent thing, this should avoid doing the division twice. I like it better than the other obvious answer (though both are close). Jan 26, 2009 at 6:50
  • This is the code of DivRem public static int DivRem(int a, int b, out int result) { result = a % b; return (a / b); } so it does not make intelligent thing!!
    – Ahmed
    Jan 26, 2009 at 7:50
  • Any reasonable compiler will see that x and y don't change between the x/y and x%y operations and thus can utilize a single divsion op to get both results. I know that gcc does this for c/c++ code. I assume c# compilers are at least as competent with such a simple optimization.
    – Evan Teran
    Jan 26, 2009 at 8:03
  • This almost certainly isn't something the C# compiler would do - it would be up to the JIT.
    – Jon Skeet
    Jan 26, 2009 at 8:22
  • 1
    fair enough, I was kinda lumping the JIT and the compiler proper into one category, but yea, the JIT would do the actual optimization.
    – Evan Teran
    Jan 26, 2009 at 15:25
14
int num = 12346;
int sum = 0;
for (int n = num; n > 0; sum += n % 10, n /= 10) ;
1
  • Although there are many correct answers but this should be the best and correct answer Oct 6, 2011 at 9:15
3

I like the chaowman's response, but would do one change

int result = 17463.ToString().Sum(c => Convert.ToInt32(c));

I'm not even sure the c - '0', syntax would work? (substracting two characters should give a character as a result I think?)

I think it's the most readable version (using of the word sum in combination with the lambda expression showing that you'll do it for every char). But indeed, I don't think it will be the fastest.

4
  • I come here 7 years late , but for some reason Convert.ToInt32 returned 4 * 54 = 206 for me when I ran it with this code: 2156.ToString().Sum(c => Convert.ToInt32(c)); Any idea whats going on? c - '0' worked perfectly tho.
    – kuskmen
    Apr 12, 2016 at 20:29
  • 1
    @kuskmen See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ww9t2871(v=vs.110).aspx ... the iterator of a string iterates over chars This invocation of ToInt32() returns a 32-bit signed integer that represents the UTF-16 encoded code unit of the value argument.
    – moreON
    Apr 15, 2016 at 6:02
  • so I guess my improvement in 2009, was not really a working improvement :-( (So just ignore this answer)
    – Tjipke
    Jul 22, 2016 at 9:33
  • 3
    Math.Abs(-123).ToString().Sum(char.GetNumericValue);
    – Slai
    Jan 14, 2017 at 21:21
3

I thought I'd just post this for completion's sake:

If you need a recursive sum of digits, e.g: 17463 -> 1 + 7 + 4 + 6 + 3 = 21 -> 2 + 1 = 3
then the best solution would be

int result = input % 9;
return (result == 0 && input > 0) ? 9 : result;
1
  • 1
    close, but should be: return (result==0 && input>0) ? 9 : result;
    – cmroanirgo
    Dec 9, 2014 at 0:17
3
int n = 17463; int sum = 0;
for (int i = n; i > 0; i = i / 10)
{
sum = sum + i % 10;
}
Console.WriteLine(sum);
Console.ReadLine();
1
  • 1
    While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion.
    – Isma
    Jan 5, 2018 at 14:56
2

I would suggest that the easiest to read implementation would be something like:

public int sum(int number)
{
    int ret = 0;
    foreach (char c in Math.Abs(number).ToString())
        ret += c - '0';
    return ret;
}

This works, and is quite easy to read. BTW: Convert.ToInt32('3') gives 51, not 3. Convert.ToInt32('3' - '0') gives 3.

I would assume that the fastest implementation is Greg Hewgill's arithmetric solution.

1
private static int getDigitSum(int ds)
{
    int dssum = 0;            
    while (ds > 0)
    {
        dssum += ds % 10;
        ds /= 10;
        if (dssum > 9)
        {                
            dssum -= 9;
        }
    }
    return dssum;
}

This is to provide the sum of digits between 0-9

1
public static int SumDigits1(int n)
{
    int sum = 0;
    int rem;
    while (n != 0)
    {           
        n = Math.DivRem(n, 10, out rem);
        sum += rem;
    }
    return sum;
}

public static int SumDigits2(int n)
{
    int sum = 0;
    int rem;
    for (sum = 0; n != 0; sum += rem)   
        n = Math.DivRem(n, 10, out rem);        
    return sum;
}   

public static int SumDigits3(int n)
{
    int sum = 0;    
    while (n != 0)
    {
        sum += n % 10;
        n /= 10;
    }   
    return sum;
}   

Complete code in: https://dotnetfiddle.net/lwKHyA

0
int j, k = 1234;
for(j=0;j+=k%10,k/=10;);
0

A while back, I had to find the digit sum of something. I used Muhammad Hasan Khan's code, however it kept returning the right number as a recurring decimal, i.e. when the digit sum was 4, i'd get 4.44444444444444 etc. Hence I edited it, getting the digit sum correct each time with this code:

 double a, n, sumD;
 for (n = a; n > 0; sumD += n % 10, n /= 10);
 int sumI = (int)Math.Floor(sumD);

where a is the number whose digit sum you want, n is a double used for this process, sumD is the digit sum in double and sumI is the digit sum in integer, so the correct digit sum.

0
static int SumOfDigits(int num)
{
    string stringNum = num.ToString();
    int sum = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < stringNum.Length; i++)
    {
      sum+= int.Parse(Convert.ToString(stringNum[i]));

    }
    return sum;
}
0

If one wants to perform specific operations like add odd numbers/even numbers only, add numbers with odd index/even index only, then following code suits best. In this example, I have added odd numbers from the input number.

using System;
                    
public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Please Input number");
        Console.WriteLine(GetSum(Console.ReadLine()));
    }
    
    public static int GetSum(string num){
        int summ = 0;
        for(int i=0; i < num.Length; i++){
            int currentNum;
            if(int.TryParse(num[i].ToString(),out currentNum)){
                 if(currentNum % 2 == 1){
                    summ += currentNum;
                }
            }
       } 
       return summ;
    }
}
1
  • The original question does not ask to sum the odd digits. Please, consider updating your answer to provide a solution to the original question. Jul 5, 2020 at 20:07
-1

The simplest and easiest way would be using loops to find sum of digits.

int sum = 0;
int n = 1234;

while(n > 0)
{
    sum += n%10;
    n /= 10;
}
-1
#include <stdio.h>

int main (void) {

    int sum = 0;
    int n;
    printf("Enter ir num ");
    scanf("%i", &n);

    while (n > 0) {
        sum += n % 10;
        n /= 10;
    }

    printf("Sum of digits is %i\n", sum);

    return 0;
}
-2

Surprised nobody considered the Substring method. Don't know whether its more efficient or not. For anyone who knows how to use this method, its quite intuitive for cases like this.

string number = "17463";
int sum = 0;
String singleDigit = "";
for (int i = 0; i < number.Length; i++)
{
singleDigit = number.Substring(i, 1);
sum = sum + int.Parse(singleDigit);
}
Console.WriteLine(sum);
Console.ReadLine();

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