9

Say I have an object constructor and a prototype method, like:

function Human(name) {
  this.name = name;
}

Human.prototype.sayName = function(){
  console.log('my name' + this.name);
};

Elsewhere in my code, I've defined an instance of human:

let jeff = new Human('jeff');

and lastly I want to pass jeff.sayName as a callback to some other function, like (for a particularly trivial example)

function callFunction(callback) {
  callback();
}

callFunction(jeff.sayName);

When I call callFunction(jeff.sayName) above, the context needs to be bound to jeff itself, like callFunction(jeff.sayName.bind(jeff)). But this is clunky, and I'd rather not have to worry about this sort of logic every time I use this method as a callback.

An alternative would be to replace Human.prototype.sayName with something like

Human.prototype.createSayName = function(context){
  return function() {
    console.log(context.name);
  };
};

and then define the function with

jeff.sayName = jeff.createSayName(jeff)

but this is a bit awkward, and I'd like to keep jeff agnostic to the methods it inherits from Human.prototype.

So ideally I'd like to handle this logic on Human.prototype itself, something like

Human.prototype.sayName.bind(WhateverObjectHoldsThisMethod)

but I'm not aware javascript has a way of doing this.

TL;DR I would like a way of binding an object's prototype method to whatever object inherits it, without having to do so every time I pass that method as an argument or every time I define a new object. Sorry if this makes little sense. Thanks!

8
  • 2
    Wait what? I don't understand the question... jeff.sayName() works on its own, no?
    – Andrew Li
    Commented Dec 20, 2017 at 1:53
  • Brain fart. Let me edit my example... Commented Dec 20, 2017 at 1:55
  • "...the context needs to be bound to jeff". The this is bound to jeff by the call: jeff.sayName(). Do you mean you want to call the method on some non-human object jim?
    – RobG
    Commented Dec 20, 2017 at 1:55
  • Fixed the bad examples - I forgot that the issue was caused by passing in jeff.sayName as an argument into another function. Commented Dec 20, 2017 at 2:36
  • 1
    callFunction(() => jeff.sayName()); Commented Dec 20, 2017 at 3:40

3 Answers 3

3

Due to the way lexical environments, scope resolution, prototypal inheritance, and environment records work in JavaScript, what you're asking for is not possible without modifying the function which calls the callback function.

However, you could—instead of passing the Human#sayName reference as the call back—use an arrow function that in turn calls the Human#sayName reference you wish to call.

It's not perfect, but it's simple, clean, and readable.

function Human(name) {
  this.name = name;
}

Human.prototype.sayName = function(){
  console.log('my name' + this.name);
};

let jeff = new Human('jeff');

function callFunction(callback) {
  callback();
}

callFunction(_ => jeff.sayName());

For a better understanding of those fancy words I referenced earlier, and how they work in JavaScript, I would recommend reading section 8.1 of the ECMAScript 2017 Language Specification. Subsection 8.1.1.3 has the specific information you're looking for, but the rest of the section up to that point is necessary to understand that subsection.

Basically, when you pass Human#sayName to callFunction, you're passing the reference to the original sayName function, so you might as well be doing this: (pardon the pun)

function callFunction(callback) {
  callback();
}

callFunction(function(){
  console.log('my name' + this.name);
});

The content of the function is not evaluated until it is executed, which means by the time it is executed, the value of this has already changed. To add to the debacle, the original function has no knowledge of which instance you requested it through. It never actually exists on the jeff object. It exists in the prototype of the the function object, and when you perform the object property look up, the JavaScript engine searches the prototype chain to find that function.

You very well could get the behavior you're asking for, but not under the constraints you have laid out. For example, if the function does not have to exist on the prototype chain, and can instead exist on the instance (keep in mind that this creates a new function object for each instance, so it will increase cost), you could define the function in the constructor, then store a reference to the correct this using an identifier that will not be overwritten:

function Human(name) {
  const _this = this;
  this.name = name;
  this.sayName = function(){
    console.log('my name' + _this.name);
  };
}

let jeff = new Human('jeff');

function callFunction(callback) {
  const _this = { name: 'hello' }; // does not affect output
  callback();
  callback.call(_this); // does not affect output
}

callFunction(jeff.sayName);

This would be a safer option, because you know that _this will always refer to the object you're expecting it to refer to within the context of the constructor, all function objects defined within that function object will inherit the identifiers of their parent scope, and those identifiers will not be affected by the calling context.

Or, you could go one step further, and not rely on the value of this at all:

function Human(name) {
  const sayName = function(){
    console.log('my name' + name);
  };
  
  Object.assign(this, { name, sayName });
}

let jeff = new Human('jeff');

function callFunction(callback) {
  const name = 'hello'; // does not affect output
  callback();
  callback.call({ name: 'world' }); // does not affect output
}

callFunction(jeff.sayName);

This has the advantages of:

  • Being easier to read,
  • Less code,
  • Allowing you explicit about the properties and methods being exposed through the object, and
  • Never having to worry about what the value of this will be.
7
  • Thanks for the clear answer, even it's in the negative. Although can I ask what you mean by "Due the way lexical scoping works in JavaScript"? I.e could you point me to something which would explain why this isn't possible? Commented Dec 20, 2017 at 4:34
  • 1
    I've edited my answer to expand upon the explanation of why it is not possible, and provide another alternative that is not within your constraints, but provides the behavior you're looking for.
    – user4639281
    Commented Dec 20, 2017 at 5:20
  • Please, nobody should need to read the Language Specification for understanding anything. There's no (or at least, by far not enough) prose that explains anything. Can't you just link the relevant chapter of YDKJS, Understanding ES6 or Exploring ES6?
    – Bergi
    Commented Dec 20, 2017 at 23:51
  • @Bergi whenever I want to achieve a deeper understanding of how JavaScript works, I turn to the language specification. I haven't read any of the documents you've linked, but I suppose I should. I personally find the language specification to be the easiest method of gaining such understanding, though if you have a better reference in mind, I wouldn't not object to an edit.
    – user4639281
    Commented Dec 21, 2017 at 1:27
  • @TinyGiant I think it's useful for a more detailed understanding, and the go-to document when you need to figure out a detail that's not mentioned anywhere else, but the spec is usually not something one would point a newbie to.
    – Bergi
    Commented Dec 21, 2017 at 1:39
0

I suppose you may want to achieve this

function Human(name) {
  this.name = name;
}

Human.prototype.sayName = function() {
  console.log('my name' + this.name);
};

let jeff = new Human('jeff');

function callFunction(callback) {
  callback();
}

callFunction(function() {
  jeff.sayName()
});

another guess, a prototype bound to an instance, it works but has anti-patten

function Human(name) {
  this.name = name;
}

const jeff = new Human('jeff');

Human.prototype.sayName = function() {
  console.log('my name' + jeff.name);
};

function callFunction(callback) {
  callback();
}
callFunction(jeff.sayName);

another guess, relection

function Human(name) {
  this.name = name;
}


Human.prototype.sayName = function() {
  console.log('my name' + this.name);
};


Human.prototype.reflectName = function(item) {
  this.sayName = () => item.sayName()
};

const jeff = new Human('jeff');

const tod = new Human('tod');
tod.reflectName(jeff)

tod.sayName()

2
  • What do you mean by archive here? Also, multiple different humans are being constructed with different methods - I can't bind the prototype to the instance for this reason. Commented Dec 20, 2017 at 3:50
  • @JohnHartman function callFunction(callback) { callback(); } will bind callback to undefined, so wrap sayName in a function will solve the context binding
    – Josh Lin
    Commented Dec 20, 2017 at 3:54
0

Expanding on TinyGiant answer, you can use an arrow function, but if you combine it with a getter, you can define it as a method of the prototype and not bother with defining your callback as a arrow function, which may be more flexible depending on your needs. Like this:

function Human(name) {
  this.name = name;
}

Object.defineProperty(Human.prototype, "sayName", {
  get: function() {
    return () => {
      console.log("my name is", this.name);
    }
  }
});


function callfunction(callback) {
  callback();
}

let jeff = new Human('jeff');

callfunction(jeff.sayName);

// just to show it works even as a regular function
jeff.sayName();

// in fact it overrides every context you bind
jeff.sayName.bind(window)()

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