34

Is there a way to convert a multidimensional array to a stdClass object in PHP?

Casting as (object) doesn't seem to work recursively. json_decode(json_encode($array)) produces the result I'm looking for, but there has to be a better way...

14 Answers 14

55

As far as I can tell, there is no prebuilt solution for this, so you can just roll your own:

function array_to_object($array) {
  $obj = new stdClass;
  foreach($array as $k => $v) {
     if(strlen($k)) {
        if(is_array($v)) {
           $obj->{$k} = array_to_object($v); //RECURSION
        } else {
           $obj->{$k} = $v;
        }
     }
  }
  return $obj;
} 
  • 3
    It's possible for PHP arrays to have empty keys, but objects can't have empty properties. It might be worth changing the else to elseif ($k !== '') – Andy May 8 '13 at 16:07
  • @Andy Fixed, thanks! – Jacob Relkin May 8 '13 at 16:50
  • Thanks for noticing that it can't be done just with the elseif! – Andy May 10 '13 at 10:36
  • It seems as if this function will silently remove values having null keys. – Bhavik Shah Jul 26 '16 at 10:55
  • 2
    and what happens with the nested arrays having numeric keys? I would opt for the json encode/decode solution. It may not be optimal but is the most bullet-proof. – itsjavi Mar 19 '17 at 23:29
36

I know this answer is coming late but I'll post it for anyone who's looking for a solution.

Instead of all this looping etc, you can use PHP's native json_* function. I've got a couple of handy functions that I use a lot

/**
 * Convert an array into a stdClass()
 * 
 * @param   array   $array  The array we want to convert
 * 
 * @return  object
 */
function arrayToObject($array)
{
    // First we convert the array to a json string
    $json = json_encode($array);

    // The we convert the json string to a stdClass()
    $object = json_decode($json);

    return $object;
}


/**
 * Convert a object to an array
 * 
 * @param   object  $object The object we want to convert
 * 
 * @return  array
 */
function objectToArray($object)
{
    // First we convert the object into a json string
    $json = json_encode($object);

    // Then we convert the json string to an array
    $array = json_decode($json, true);

    return $array;
}

Hope this can be helpful

  • 3
    I appreciate the better-late-than-never post, but my original question referenced this method. – Peter Feb 9 '12 at 6:01
  • I have no valid defense on how I managed to overlook that :/ Only thing I can do is put my glasses on and quote Steve Erkle; Did I do that!? Back on topic: To my knowledge and in my humble opinion, this is the cleanest and most optimal way to do it. Please correct me if I'm wrong :) – Ole Feb 15 '12 at 19:18
  • 3
    It may be the cleanest if you're judging by lines of code, but there's much more overhead involved. Jacob Relkin's answer is more efficient and just as easily coded. – Peter Feb 28 '12 at 0:29
7
function toObject($array) {
    $obj = new stdClass();
    foreach ($array as $key => $val) {
        $obj->$key = is_array($val) ? toObject($val) : $val;
    }
    return $obj;
}
3
/**
 * Recursively converts associative arrays to stdClass while keeping integer keys subarrays as arrays
 * (lists of scalar values or collection of objects).
 */
function a2o( array $array ) {
    $resultObj = new \stdClass;
    $resultArr = array();
    $hasIntKeys = false;
    $hasStrKeys = false;
    foreach ( $array as $k => $v ) {
        if ( !$hasIntKeys ) {
            $hasIntKeys = is_int( $k );
        }
        if ( !$hasStrKeys ) {
            $hasStrKeys = is_string( $k );
        }
        if ( $hasIntKeys && $hasStrKeys ) {
            $e = new \Exception( 'Current level has both integer and string keys, thus it is impossible to keep array or convert to object' );
            $e->vars = array( 'level' => $array );
            throw $e;
        }
        if ( $hasStrKeys ) {
            $resultObj->{$k} = is_array( $v ) ? a2o( $v ) : $v;
        } else {
            $resultArr[$k] = is_array( $v ) ? a2o( $v ) : $v;
        }
    }
    return ($hasStrKeys) ? $resultObj : $resultArr;
} 
2

Some of the other solutions posted here fail to tell apart sequential arrays (what would be [] in JS) from maps ({} in JS.) For many use cases it's important to tell apart PHP arrays that have all sequential numeric keys, which should be left as such, from PHP arrays that have no numeric keys, which should be converted to objects. (My solutions below are undefined for arrays that don't fall in the above two categories.)

The json_decode(json_encode($x)) method does handle the two types correctly, but is not the fastest solution. It's still decent though, totaling 25µs per run on my sample data (averaged over 1M runs, minus the loop overhead.)

I benchmarked a couple of variations of the recursive converter and ended up with the following. It rebuilds all arrays and objects (performing a deep copy) but seems to be faster than alternative solutions that modify the arrays in place. It clocks at 11µs per execution on my sample data:

function array_to_object($x) {
    if (!is_array($x)) {
        return $x;
    } elseif (is_numeric(key($x))) {
        return array_map(__FUNCTION__, $x);
    } else {
        return (object) array_map(__FUNCTION__, $x);
    }
}

Here is an in-place version. It may be faster on some large input data where only small parts need to be converted, but on my sample data it took 15µs per execution:

function array_to_object_inplace(&$x) {
    if (!is_array($x)) {
        return;
    }
    array_walk($x, __FUNCTION__);
    reset($x);
    if (!is_numeric(key($x))) {
        $x = (object) $x;
    }
}

I did not try out solutions using array_walk_recursive()

  • The first method, just created an empty object. The second method for me only managed to make the outermost associative array into an stdClass object. Everything else internally remained an array. – Kimberly W Feb 9 '18 at 2:18
  • @KimberlyW I just tested both and they still work in PHP 7. See this example – Tobia Feb 9 '18 at 10:13
2

You can use the array_map recursively:

public static function _arrayToObject($array) {
    return is_array($array) ? (object) array_map([__CLASS__, __METHOD__], $array) : $array;
}

Works perfect for me since it doesn't cast for example Carbon objects to a basic stdClass (which the json encode/decode does)

  • This is simple and sweet and useful when you need this type of utility within a class; references of which are hard to find. You should wrap it in an example class just for clarity. Otherwise, good example of the CLASS, METHOD magic... you don't see it often. – ChrisN Jan 18 '18 at 13:52
2
public static function _arrayToObject($array) {
    $json = json_encode($array);
    $object = json_decode($json);
    return $object
}
2

The simpliest way to convert an associative array to object is:

First encode it in json, then decode it.

like $objectArray = json_decode(json_encode($associtiveArray));

1

You and many others have pointed to the JSON built-in functions, json_decode() and json_encode(). The method which you have mentioned works, but not completely: it won't convert indexed arrays to objects, and they will remain as indexed arrays. However, there is a trick to overcome this problem. You can use JSON_FORCE_OBJECT constant:

// Converts an array to an object recursively
$object = json_decode(json_encode($array, JSON_FORCE_OBJECT));

Tip: Also, as mentioned here, you can convert an object to array recursively using JSON functions:

// Converts an object to an array recursively
$array = json_decode(json_encode($object), true));    
0

Here's a function to do an in-place deep array-to-object conversion that uses PHP internal (shallow) array-to-object type casting mechanism. It creates new objects only when necessary, minimizing data duplication.

function toObject($array) {
    foreach ($array as $key=>$value)
        if (is_array($value))
            $array[$key] = toObject($value);
    return (object)$array;
}

Warning - do not use this code if there is a risk of having circular references.

0

Here is a smooth way to do it that can handle an associative array with great depth and doesn't overwrite object properties that are not in the array.

    <?php

    function setPropsViaArray( $a, $o )
    {
        foreach ( $a as $k => $v )
        {
            if ( is_array( $v ) )
            {
                $o->{$k} = setPropsViaArray( $v, ! empty ( $o->{$k} ) ? $o->{$k} : new stdClass() );
            }
            else
            {
                $o->{$k} = $v;
            }
        }
        return $o;
    };

    setPropsViaArray( $newArrayData, $existingObject );
0

The shortest I could come up with:

array_walk_recursive($obj, function (&$val) { if (is_object($val)) $val = get_object_vars($val); });
0

Late, but just wanted to mention that you can use the JSON encoding/decoding to convert fully from/to array:

//convert object $object into array
$array = json_decode(json_encode($object), true);
//convert array $array into object
$object = json_decode(json_encode($array));

json_encode and json_decode functions are available starting from php 5.2

0

EDIT: This function is conversion from object to array.

From https://forrst.com/posts/PHP_Recursive_Object_to_Array_good_for_handling-0ka

protected function object_to_array($obj)
{
    $arrObj = is_object($obj) ? get_object_vars($obj) : $obj;
    foreach ($arrObj as $key => $val) {
            $val = (is_array($val) || is_object($val)) ? $this->object_to_array($val) : $val;
            $arr[$key] = $val;
    }
    return $arr;
}
  • Why the $arrObj isn't returned if it's allready an object? – guido Nov 25 '17 at 22:13
  • Because I misunderstood the quetion, this fn is conversion from object to array. I'll update my answer. – Kamil Nov 26 '17 at 13:51

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