2

Suppose I've the following YAML file:

---
task:
  1:
    command: '<task1_command>'
    desc: '<task1_description>'
  2:
    command: '<task2_command>'
    desc: '<task2_description>'

I read the file using Perl and YAML::Tiny:

$TASKS = YAML::Tiny->read(<YAML_file>);

And I'm able to use the desc/command values normally but if I write the TASKS data using:

$TASKS->write(<YAML_file>);

I got the following:

---
task:
  '1':
    command: '<task1_command>'
    desc: '<task1_description>'
  '2':
    command: '<task2_command>'
    desc: '<task2_description>'

The task numbers are between single quotes! Is there a way to "force" YAML::Tiny to treat the tasks values as "numbers" instead of "strings"?

2

There does not seem to be a way around this and looks like a bug has been submitted here ---

YAML::Tiny

However this can be accomplished using YAML like so:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;
use YAML;

{
    no warnings;
    local $YAML::Numify = 1;
}

my $file = YAML::LoadFile('test.yml');

open my $fh, '>', 'output.yml';
print $fh YAML::Dump $file;
close($fh);
  • Using warnings produces a message, wrapping the local YAML::Numify is curly braces with no warnings suppresses this. The output is indeed as expected either way

test.yml

---
task:
  '1':
    desc: '85'
    command: '<task1_command>'
  2:
    desc: '100'
    command: '<task2_command>'

output.yml

---
task:
  1:
    command: '<task1_command>'
    desc: 85
  2:
    command: '<task2_command>'
    desc: 100
  • Adding the curly braces around local $YAML::Numify = 1; without moving anything else completely removes its point. $YAML::Numify will no longer have that value as soon as Perl hits the }. You will have to move the LoadFile call inside the block if that is what you intend. Even with that corrected, the value of ::Numify seems to make no difference. – Dre Dec 20 '17 at 16:58
2

The 1 and 2 in your data are used as hash keys in the corresponding Perl data structure, and so always have to be strings. The result of your read call will be this

bless([
  {
    task => {
      1 => { command => "<task1_command>", desc => "<task1_description>" },
      2 => { command => "<task2_command>", desc => "<task2_description>" },
    },
  },
], "YAML::Tiny")

However, Perl will always do the right thing if you just use a numeric string as if it were a number, so I'm wondering what it is about your application that requires these values to be "numbers"

  • You're right, everything is just fine with the application behaviour... the problem is that the application can change some tasks values and when it recreates the YAML file ($TASKS->write(<YAML_file>)) the single quotes are unnecessarily added to all tasks numbers. – Marcelo Ávila de Oliveira Dec 20 '17 at 16:58
  • @Marcelo: And is that a problem to the receiving program, or do you just not like it? – Borodin Dec 20 '17 at 17:41
  • It's not a big problem (the file with quotes works the same way) but sometimes people execute a "diff" between files and find a lot of "differences" due to these added quotes. – Marcelo Ávila de Oliveira Dec 20 '17 at 18:10
  • @Marcelo: Then I suggest you should change whatever is creating the source YAML to use strings instead, then everyone is happy. What language is the target of this new YAML data written in? Many languages allow only strings for the keys of their dictionary-like structures and, like Perl, there is no way to generate YAML with numeric keys. If all else fails then you could just post-process it with perl -i -pe 's/^\s*\K'(\d+)':/$1:/' myfile.yaml or warn people that that may be necessary before a diff. – Borodin Dec 20 '17 at 19:47
  • 1
    @Marcelo: Note that, in particular, it is a very bad idea to compare two YAML data structures using diff, as the same data may be represented in many different ways. The simplest example is that the order of keys within a mapping is irrelevant to the semantics, so they may appear in any order and remain equivalent. A useful alternative would be to write a simple Perl tool yaml_diff that used Data::Diff to read and compare the contents of two YAML files. That sounds like the best solution over all to me. – Borodin Dec 20 '17 at 19:58

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