1

I am trying to read a large text file into a TextBox and keep the ui responsive when a file is dragged to the textbox.

Not works as expected, the windows forms is frozen and only seems working the task reading the file and appending the content to the textbox.

A ContextSwitchDeadLock was thrown by the IDE, but not really an error. This is a long running task. I have fixed it changing the behaviour under the exception menu.

Thanks to JSteward, Peter changed the code to this.

How I can keep the ui ( main thread) responsive when running this task ? Thanks.

private SynchronizationContext fcontext;

public Form1()
{      
    InitializeComponent();            
    values.DragDrop += values_DragDrop; //<----------- This is a textbox
    fcontext = WindowsFormsSynchronizationContext.Current;
}

// The async callback 
async void values_DragDrop(object sender, DragEventArgs e)
{
    try
    {
        string dropped = ( (string[]) e.Data.GetData(DataFormats.FileDrop))[0];
        if ( dropped.Contains(".csv") || dropped.Contains(".txt"))
        {
                using ( StreamReader sr = File.OpenText(dropped) )
                {
                    string s = String.Empty;
                    while ( ( s = await sr.ReadLineAsync() ) != null )
                    {                                                                
                       values.AppendText(s.Replace(";",""));
                    }
                }                 
         }
     }
  catch (Exception ex) { }
}
  • 2
    You could just ...AppendText(await ...ReadLineAsync) instead of using the blocking variant of the File api. That way you wouldn't need to store or post to a context manually. – JSteward Dec 20 '17 at 20:35
  • 2
    I think you mean it can only be applied to an async lamda expression. Could you update the code in the question? – JSteward Dec 20 '17 at 20:50
  • 2
    You won't be able to AppendText from the Task.Run default context. Using the async api you shouldn't need the Task.Run but understand that your drag drop is likely going to end before you finish reading the file. Also, you may need to load the file in batches to keep the ui responsive and let the Forms loop take its turn. – JSteward Dec 20 '17 at 21:09
  • 3
    "The trouble seems to be the loading function" -- what function do you consider to be "the loading function"? @JSteward has already explained that you don't need Task.Run(), because you are reading using async/await. It is impossible to actually answer your question, because you haven't provided a good minimal reproducible example that reproduces the issue. But, most likely you are reading too little data at a time, saturating the UI thread with update requests, which is just as bad as blocking it. Try refactoring the code so that updates to the UI occur only every 100-500 ms or so. – Peter Duniho Dec 20 '17 at 21:46
  • 2
    "I think the question is complete and verificable" -- if you were the person answering the question, then what you think might be relevant. But, you're not and it isn't. Please read minimal reproducible example. Also, read How to Ask, along with all of the articles linked at the bottom of that page, so that you understand what is actually meant by minimal reproducible example, and what is needed to present your question in a clear, answerable way. – Peter Duniho Dec 20 '17 at 22:27
2

Sometimes it is indeed required to do some asynchronous, background operation on the UI thread (e.g., syntax highlighting, spellcheck-as-you-type, etc). I am not going to question the design issues with your particular (IMO, contrived) example - most likely you should be using the MVVM pattern here - but you can certainly keep the UI thread responsive.

You can do that by sensing for any pending user input and yielding to the main message loop, to give it the processing priority. Here's a complete, cut-paste-and-run example of how to do that in WinForms, based on the task you're trying to solve. Note await InputYield(token) which does just that:

using System;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;
using System.Windows.Forms;

namespace WinFormsYield
{
    static class Program
    {
        // a long-running operation on the UI thread
        private static async Task LongRunningTaskAsync(Action<string> deliverText, CancellationToken token)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
            {
                token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
                await InputYield(token);
                deliverText(await ReadLineAsync(token));
            }
        }

        [STAThread]
        static void Main()
        {
            Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);

            // create some UI

            var form = new Form { Text = "Test", Width = 800, Height = 600 };

            var panel = new FlowLayoutPanel
            {
                Dock = DockStyle.Fill,
                FlowDirection = FlowDirection.TopDown,
                WrapContents = true
            };

            form.Controls.Add(panel);
            var button = new Button { Text = "Start", AutoSize = true };
            panel.Controls.Add(button);

            var inputBox = new TextBox
            {
                Text = "You still can type here while we're loading the file",
                Width = 640
            };
            panel.Controls.Add(inputBox);

            var textBox = new TextBox
            {
                Width = 640,
                Height = 480,
                Multiline = true,
                ReadOnly = false,
                AcceptsReturn = true,
                ScrollBars = ScrollBars.Vertical
            };
            panel.Controls.Add(textBox);

            // handle Button click to "load" some text

            button.Click += async delegate
            {
                button.Enabled = false;
                textBox.Enabled = false;
                inputBox.Focus();
                try
                {
                    await LongRunningTaskAsync(text =>
                        textBox.AppendText(text + Environment.NewLine),
                        CancellationToken.None);
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
                }
                finally
                {
                    button.Enabled = true;
                    textBox.Enabled = true;
                }
            };

            Application.Run(form);
        }

        // simulate TextReader.ReadLineAsync
        private static async Task<string> ReadLineAsync(CancellationToken token)
        {
            return await Task.Run(() =>
            {
                Thread.Sleep(10); // simulate some CPU-bound work
                return "Line " + Environment.TickCount;
            }, token);
        }

        //
        // helpers
        //

        private static async Task TimerYield(int delay, CancellationToken token)
        {
            // yield to the message loop via a low-priority WM_TIMER message (used by System.Windows.Forms.Timer)
            // https://web.archive.org/web/20130627005845/http://support.microsoft.com/kb/96006 

            var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();
            using (var timer = new System.Windows.Forms.Timer())
            using (token.Register(() => tcs.TrySetCanceled(), useSynchronizationContext: false))
            {
                timer.Interval = delay;
                timer.Tick += (s, e) => tcs.TrySetResult(true);
                timer.Enabled = true;
                await tcs.Task;
                timer.Enabled = false;
            }
        }

        private static async Task InputYield(CancellationToken token)
        {
            while (AnyInputMessage())
            {
                await TimerYield((int)NativeMethods.USER_TIMER_MINIMUM, token);
            }
        }

        private static bool AnyInputMessage()
        {
            var status = NativeMethods.GetQueueStatus(NativeMethods.QS_INPUT | NativeMethods.QS_POSTMESSAGE);
            // the high-order word of the return value indicates the types of messages currently in the queue. 
            return status >> 16 != 0;
        }

        private static class NativeMethods
        {
            public const uint USER_TIMER_MINIMUM = 0x0000000A;
            public const uint QS_KEY = 0x0001;
            public const uint QS_MOUSEMOVE = 0x0002;
            public const uint QS_MOUSEBUTTON = 0x0004;
            public const uint QS_POSTMESSAGE = 0x0008;
            public const uint QS_TIMER = 0x0010;
            public const uint QS_PAINT = 0x0020;
            public const uint QS_SENDMESSAGE = 0x0040;
            public const uint QS_HOTKEY = 0x0080;
            public const uint QS_ALLPOSTMESSAGE = 0x0100;
            public const uint QS_RAWINPUT = 0x0400;

            public const uint QS_MOUSE = (QS_MOUSEMOVE | QS_MOUSEBUTTON);
            public const uint QS_INPUT = (QS_MOUSE | QS_KEY | QS_RAWINPUT);

            [DllImport("user32.dll")]
            public static extern uint GetQueueStatus(uint flags);
        }
    }
}

Now you should ask yourself what you're going to do if user modifies the content of the editor while it's still being populated with text on the background. Here for simplicity I just disable the button and the editor itself (the rest of the UI is accessible and responsive), but the question remains open. Also, you should look at implementing some cancellation logic, which I leave outside the scope of this sample.

  • Nice! But I have a question. Why you use Thread.Sleep instead Task.Delay ? – ppk Dec 22 '17 at 12:59
  • @ppk, the ReadLineAsync implementation here is just a mockup for testing. I use Thread.Sleep inside a Task.Run lambda on purpose here, to denote some CPU-bound work of generating a line of text, which is offloaded to a pool thread. Other than for testing, you'd almost never need Thread.Sleep in a production code, indeed. – noseratio Dec 22 '17 at 22:02
  • 2
    Thanks for the additional explanation. – ppk Dec 24 '17 at 12:04
2

If you need to keep the UI responsive, just give it the time to breath.
Reading one line of text is so fast that you are (a)waiting almost nothing, while Updating the UI takes longer. Inserting even a very little delay lets the UI update.

Using Async/Await (SynchronizationContext is captured by await)

public Form1()
{
   InitializeComponent();
   values.DragDrop += new DragEventHandler(this.OnDrop);
   values.DragEnter += new DragEventHandler(this.OnDragEnter);
}

public async void OnDrop(object sender, DragEventArgs e)
{
   string _dropped = ((string[])e.Data.GetData(DataFormats.FileDrop))[0];
   if (_dropped.Contains(".csv") || _dropped.Contains(".txt"))
   {
      try
      {
         string _s = string.Empty;
         using (TextReader tr = new StreamReader(_dropped))
         {
            while (tr.Peek() >= 0)
            {
               _s = await tr.ReadLineAsync();
               values.AppendText(_s.Replace(";", " ") + "\r\n");
               await Task.Delay(10);
            }
         }
      }
      catch (Exception) {
         //Do something here
      }
   }
}

private void OnDragEnter(object sender, DragEventArgs e)
{
   e.Effect = e.Data.GetDataPresent(DataFormats.FileDrop, false) ?
                                    DragDropEffects.Copy :
                                    DragDropEffects.None;
}

TPL using Task.Factory
TPL executes Tasks through a TaskScheduler.
A TaskScheduler may be used to queue tasks to a SynchronizationContext.

TaskScheduler _Scheduler = TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext();

//No async here
public void OnDrop(object sender, DragEventArgs e)
{
   string _dropped = ((string[])e.Data.GetData(DataFormats.FileDrop))[0];
   if (_dropped.Contains(".csv") || _dropped.Contains(".txt"))
   {
      Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
      {
         string _s = string.Empty;
         int x = 0;
         try
         {
            using (TextReader tr = new StreamReader(_dropped))
            {
               while (tr.Peek() >= 0)
               {
                  _s += (tr.ReadLine().Replace(";", " ")) + "\r\n";
                  ++x;
                  //Update the UI after reading 20 lines
                  if (x >= 20)
                  {
                     //Update the UI or report progress 
                     Task UpdateUI = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
                     {
                        try {
                           values.AppendText(_s);
                        }
                        catch (Exception) {
                           //An exception is raised if the form is closed
                        }
                     }, CancellationToken.None, TaskCreationOptions.PreferFairness, _Scheduler);
                     UpdateUI.Wait();
                     x = 0;
                  }
               }
            }
         }
         catch (Exception) {
            //Do something here
         }
      });
   }
}
1

Perhaps use Microsoft's Reactive Framework for this. Here's the code you need:

using System.Reactive.Concurrency;
using System.Reactive.Linq;

namespace YourNamespace
{
    public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            IDisposable subscription =
                Observable
                    .FromEventPattern<DragEventHandler, DragEventArgs>(h => values.DragDrop += h, h => values.DragDrop -= h)
                    .Select(ep => ((string[])ep.EventArgs.Data.GetData(DataFormats.FileDrop))[0])
                    .ObserveOn(Scheduler.Default)
                    .Where(dropped => dropped.Contains(".csv") || dropped.Contains(".txt"))
                    .SelectMany(dropped => System.IO.File.ReadLines(dropped))
                    .ObserveOn(this)
                    .Subscribe(line => values.AppendText(line + Environment.NewLine));
        }
    }
}

Should you want to clear the text box before adding values then replace the .SelectMany with this:

.SelectMany(dropped => { values.Text = ""; return System.IO.File.ReadLines(dropped); })

NuGet "System.Reactive" & "System.Reactive.Windows.Forms" to get the bits.

When closing your form just do a subscription.Dispose() to remove the event handler.

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