120

Is it true that C++0x will come without semaphores? There are already some questions on Stack Overflow regarding the use of semaphores. I use them (posix semaphores) all the time to let a thread wait for some event in another thread:

void thread0(...)
{
  doSomething0();

  event1.wait();

  ...
}

void thread1(...)
{
  doSomething1();

  event1.post();

  ...
}

If I would do that with a mutex:

void thread0(...)
{
  doSomething0();

  event1.lock(); event1.unlock();

  ...
}

void thread1(...)
{
  event1.lock();

  doSomethingth1();

  event1.unlock();

  ...
}

Problem: It's ugly and it's not guaranteed that thread1 locks the mutex first (Given that the same thread should lock and unlock a mutex, you also can't lock event1 before thread0 and thread1 started).

So since boost doesn't have semaphores either, what is the simplest way to achieve the above?

  • Maybe use the condition mutex and std::promise and std::future? – Yves Dec 13 '16 at 8:22
161

You can easily build one from a mutex and a condition variable:

#include <mutex>
#include <condition_variable>

class semaphore
{
private:
    std::mutex mutex_;
    std::condition_variable condition_;
    unsigned long count_ = 0; // Initialized as locked.

public:
    void notify() {
        std::lock_guard<decltype(mutex_)> lock(mutex_);
        ++count_;
        condition_.notify_one();
    }

    void wait() {
        std::unique_lock<decltype(mutex_)> lock(mutex_);
        while(!count_) // Handle spurious wake-ups.
            condition_.wait(lock);
        --count_;
    }

    bool try_wait() {
        std::lock_guard<decltype(mutex_)> lock(mutex_);
        if(count_) {
            --count_;
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }
};
  • 91
    someone should submit a proposal to the standards commitee – Ion Todirel Jun 6 '12 at 23:36
  • 6
    a comment here that puzzled me initially is the lock in wait, one might ask how can a thread can get past notify if the lock is held by wait? the somewhat poorly obscurely documented answer is that condition_variable.wait pulses the lock, allowing another thread to get past notify in an atomic fashion, at least that's how I understand it – Ion Todirel Jun 14 '12 at 6:53
  • 2
    pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/009696799/functions/…: The pthread_cond_broadcast() or pthread_cond_signal() functions may be called by a thread whether or not it currently owns the mutex that threads calling pthread_cond_wait() or pthread_cond_timedwait() have associated with the condition variable during their waits; however, if predictable scheduling behavior is required, then that mutex shall be locked by the thread calling pthread_cond_broadcast() or pthread_cond_signal(). – Maxim Egorushkin Jun 14 '12 at 18:16
  • 28
    It was deliberately excluded from Boost on the basis that a semaphore is too much rope for programmers to hang themselves with. Condition variables supposedly are more manageable. I see their point but feel a bit patronized. I assume that the same logic applies to C++11 -- programmers are expected to write their programs in a way that "naturally" uses condvars or other approved synchronization techniques. Supply a semaphore would run against that regardless of whether it's implemented on top of condvar or natively. – Steve Jessop Aug 31 '12 at 15:31
  • 3
    Note - See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spurious_wakeup for the rationale behind the while(!count_) loop. – Dan Nissenbaum Nov 16 '12 at 7:49
98

Based on Maxim Yegorushkin's answer, I tried to make the example in C++11 style.

#include <mutex>
#include <condition_variable>

class Semaphore {
public:
    Semaphore (int count_ = 0)
        : count(count_) {}

    inline void notify()
    {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(mtx);
        count++;
        cv.notify_one();
    }

    inline void wait()
    {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> lock(mtx);

        while(count == 0){
            cv.wait(lock);
        }
        count--;
    }

private:
    std::mutex mtx;
    std::condition_variable cv;
    int count;
};
  • 29
    You can make wait() also a three-liner: cv.wait(lck, [this]() { return count > 0; }); – Domi Dec 6 '13 at 13:14
  • 2
    Adding another class in the spirit of lock_guard is helpful, too. In RAII fashion, the constructor, which takes the semaphore as a reference, calls the semaphore's wait() call, and the destructor calls its notify() call. This prevents exceptions from failing to release the semaphore. – Jim Hunziker Oct 24 '14 at 16:58
  • isn't there a dead-lock, if say N threads called wait() and count==0, then cv.notify_one(); is never called, since the mtx hasn't released? – Marcello May 18 '15 at 21:26
  • @Marcello semaphore is the locking mechanism waiting until someone notify... – Tsuneo Yoshioka May 19 '15 at 5:18
  • 1
    @Marcello The waiting threads don't hold the lock. The whole point of condition variables is to provide an atomic "unlock and wait" operation. – David Schwartz Oct 19 '15 at 21:39
36

I decided to write the most robust/generic C++11 semaphore I could, in the style of the standard as much as I could (note using semaphore = ..., you normally would just use the name semaphore similar to normally using string not basic_string):

template <typename Mutex, typename CondVar>
class basic_semaphore {
public:
    using native_handle_type = typename CondVar::native_handle_type;

    explicit basic_semaphore(size_t count = 0);
    basic_semaphore(const basic_semaphore&) = delete;
    basic_semaphore(basic_semaphore&&) = delete;
    basic_semaphore& operator=(const basic_semaphore&) = delete;
    basic_semaphore& operator=(basic_semaphore&&) = delete;

    void notify();
    void wait();
    bool try_wait();
    template<class Rep, class Period>
    bool wait_for(const std::chrono::duration<Rep, Period>& d);
    template<class Clock, class Duration>
    bool wait_until(const std::chrono::time_point<Clock, Duration>& t);

    native_handle_type native_handle();

private:
    Mutex   mMutex;
    CondVar mCv;
    size_t  mCount;
};

using semaphore = basic_semaphore<std::mutex, std::condition_variable>;

template <typename Mutex, typename CondVar>
basic_semaphore<Mutex, CondVar>::basic_semaphore(size_t count)
    : mCount{count}
{}

template <typename Mutex, typename CondVar>
void basic_semaphore<Mutex, CondVar>::notify() {
    std::lock_guard<Mutex> lock{mMutex};
    ++mCount;
    mCv.notify_one();
}

template <typename Mutex, typename CondVar>
void basic_semaphore<Mutex, CondVar>::wait() {
    std::unique_lock<Mutex> lock{mMutex};
    mCv.wait(lock, [&]{ return mCount > 0; });
    --mCount;
}

template <typename Mutex, typename CondVar>
bool basic_semaphore<Mutex, CondVar>::try_wait() {
    std::lock_guard<Mutex> lock{mMutex};

    if (mCount > 0) {
        --mCount;
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}

template <typename Mutex, typename CondVar>
template<class Rep, class Period>
bool basic_semaphore<Mutex, CondVar>::wait_for(const std::chrono::duration<Rep, Period>& d) {
    std::unique_lock<Mutex> lock{mMutex};
    auto finished = mCv.wait_for(lock, d, [&]{ return mCount > 0; });

    if (finished)
        --mCount;

    return finished;
}

template <typename Mutex, typename CondVar>
template<class Clock, class Duration>
bool basic_semaphore<Mutex, CondVar>::wait_until(const std::chrono::time_point<Clock, Duration>& t) {
    std::unique_lock<Mutex> lock{mMutex};
    auto finished = mCv.wait_until(lock, t, [&]{ return mCount > 0; });

    if (finished)
        --mCount;

    return finished;
}

template <typename Mutex, typename CondVar>
typename basic_semaphore<Mutex, CondVar>::native_handle_type basic_semaphore<Mutex, CondVar>::native_handle() {
    return mCv.native_handle();
}
  • This works, with a minor edit. The wait_for and wait_until method calls with the predicate return a boolean value (not a `std::cv_status). – jdknight Mar 4 '15 at 20:17
  • @jdknight thanks, fixed it – David Mar 4 '15 at 23:39
  • 3
    @RichardHodges there's no way to decrement below zero so there's no problem, and what would a negative count on a semaphore mean? That doesn't even make sense IMO. – David Dec 1 '15 at 15:39
  • 1
    @David What if a thread had to wait for others to initalize things? for instance, 1 reader thread to wait for 4 threads, I would call the semaphore constructor with -3 to make the reader thread wait untill all the other threads made a post. I guess there are other ways to do that, but isn't it reasonable? I think it's in fact the question the OP is asking but with more "thread1"s. – jmmut Jun 20 '16 at 13:48
  • 1
    @RichardHodges to be very pedantic, decrementing an unsigned integer type below 0 is not UB. – jcai Jun 2 '17 at 19:29
14

in acordance with posix semaphores, I would add

class semaphore
{
    ...
    bool trywait()
    {
        boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(mutex_);
        if(count_)
        {
            --count_;
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            return false;
        }
    }
};

And I much prefer using a synchronisation mechanism at a convenient level of abstraction, rather than always copy pasting a stitched-together version using more basic operators.

8

You can also check out cpp11-on-multicore - it has a portable and optimal semaphore implementation.

The repository also contains other threading goodies that complement c++11 threading.

6

You can work with mutex and condition variables. You gain exclusive access with the mutex, check whether you want to continue or need to wait for the other end. If you need to wait, you wait in a condition. When the other thread determines that you can continue, it signals the condition.

There is a short example in the boost::thread library that you can most probably just copy (the C++0x and boost thread libs are very similar).

  • Condition signals only to waiting threads, or not? So if thread0 is not there waiting when thread1 signals it will be blocked later? Plus: I don't need the additional lock that comes with the condition - it's overhead. – tauran Jan 25 '11 at 10:49
  • Yes, condition only signals waiting threads. The common pattern is having a variable with the state and a condition in case you need to wait. Think on a producer/consumer, there will be a count on the items in the buffer, the producer locks, adds the element, increments the count and signals. The consumer locks, checks the counter and if non-zero consumes, while if zero waits in the condition. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 25 '11 at 11:13
  • 2
    You can simulate a semaphore this way: Initialize a variable with the value that you would give the semaphore, then wait() is translated to "lock, check count if non-zero decrement and continue; if zero wait on condition" while post would be "lock, increment counter, signal if it was 0" – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 25 '11 at 11:17
  • Yes, sounds good. I wonder if posix semaphores are implemented the same way. – tauran Jan 25 '11 at 11:25
  • @tauran: I don't know for sure (and it might depend which Posix OS), but I think unlikely. Semaphores traditionally are a "lower-level" synchronization primitive than mutexes and condition variables, and in principle can be made more efficient than they would be if implemented on top of a condvar. So, more likely in a given OS is that all user-level synch primitives are built on top of some common tools that interact with the scheduler. – Steve Jessop Aug 31 '12 at 15:28
2

Also can be useful RAII semaphore wrapper in threads:

class ScopedSemaphore
{
public:
    explicit ScopedSemaphore(Semaphore& sem) : m_Semaphore(sem) { m_Semaphore.Wait(); }
    ScopedSemaphore(const ScopedSemaphore&) = delete;
    ~ScopedSemaphore() { m_Semaphore.Notify(); }

   ScopedSemaphore& operator=(const ScopedSemaphore&) = delete;

private:
    Semaphore& m_Semaphore;
};

Usage example in multithread app:

boost::ptr_vector<std::thread> threads;
Semaphore semaphore;

for (...)
{
    ...
    auto t = new std::thread([..., &semaphore]
    {
        ScopedSemaphore scopedSemaphore(semaphore);
        ...
    }
    );
    threads.push_back(t);
}

for (auto& t : threads)
    t.join();
1

I found the shared_ptr and weak_ptr, a long with a list, did the job I needed. My issue was, I had several clients wanting to interact with a host's internal data. Typically, the host updates the data on it's own, however, if a client requests it, the host needs to stop updating until no clients are accessing the host data. At the same time, a client could ask for exclusive access, so that no other clients, nor the host, could modify that host data.

How I did this was, I created a struct:

struct UpdateLock
{
    typedef std::shared_ptr< UpdateLock > ptr;
};

Each client would have a member of such:

UpdateLock::ptr m_myLock;

Then the host would have a weak_ptr member for exclusivity, and a list of weak_ptrs for non-exclusive locks:

std::weak_ptr< UpdateLock > m_exclusiveLock;
std::list< std::weak_ptr< UpdateLock > > m_locks;

There is a function to enable locking, and another function to check if the host is locked:

UpdateLock::ptr LockUpdate( bool exclusive );       
bool IsUpdateLocked( bool exclusive ) const;

I test for locks in LockUpdate, IsUpdateLocked, and periodically in the host's Update routine. Testing for a lock is as simple as checking if the weak_ptr's expired, and removing any expired from the m_locks list (I only do this during the host update), I can check if the list is empty; at the same time, I get automatic unlocking when a client resets the shared_ptr they are hanging onto, which also happens when a client gets destroyed automatically.

The over all effect is, since clients rarely need exclusivity (typically reserved for additions and deletions only), most of the time a request to LockUpdate( false ), that is to say non-exclusive, succeeds so long as (! m_exclusiveLock). And a LockUpdate( true ), a request for exclusivity, succeeds only when both (! m_exclusiveLock) and (m_locks.empty()).

A queue could be added to mitigate between exclusive and non-exclusive locks, however, I have had no collisions thus far, so I intend to wait until that happens to add the solution (mostly so I have a real-world test condition).

So far this is working well for my needs; I can imagine the need to expand this, and some issues that might arise over expanded use, however, this was quick to implement, and required very little custom code.

-3

In case someone is interested in the atomic version, here is the implementation. The performance is expected better than the mutex & condition variable version.

class semaphore_atomic
{
public:
    void notify() {
        count_.fetch_add(1, std::memory_order_release);
    }

    void wait() {
        while (true) {
            int count = count_.load(std::memory_order_relaxed);
            if (count > 0) {
                if (count_.compare_exchange_weak(count, count-1, std::memory_order_acq_rel, std::memory_order_relaxed)) {
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    bool try_wait() {
        int count = count_.load(std::memory_order_relaxed);
        if (count > 0) {
            if (count_.compare_exchange_strong(count, count-1, std::memory_order_acq_rel, std::memory_order_relaxed)) {
                return true;
            }
        }
        return false;
    }
private:
    std::atomic_int count_{0};
};
  • 2
    I would expect the performance to be much worse. This code makes almost literally every possible mistake. As just the most obvious example, suppose the wait code has to loop several times. When it finally unblocks, it will take the mother of all mispredicted branches as the CPU's loop prediction will certainly predict it will loop again. I could list many more issues with this code. – David Schwartz Feb 13 '17 at 4:33
  • 1
    Here's another obvious performance killer: The wait loop will consume CPU microexecution resources as it spins. Suppose it's in the same physical core as the thread that's supposed to notify it -- it will slow that thread down terribly. – David Schwartz Feb 13 '17 at 4:34
  • 1
    And here's just one more: On x86 CPUs (the most popular CPUs today), a compare_exchange_weak operation is always a write operation, even if it fails (it writes back the same value it read if the compare fails). So suppose two cores are both in a wait loop for the same semaphore. They're both writing at full speed to the same cache line, which can slow other cores to a crawl by saturating inter-core buses. – David Schwartz Feb 13 '17 at 4:35
  • @DavidSchwartz Glad to see your comments. Not sure understand the '...CPU's loop prediction...' part. Agreed the 2nd one. Apparently your 3rd case can happen, but compare to mutex which causes user-mode to kernel-mode switch and system call, the inter-core sync is not worse. – Jeffery Feb 13 '17 at 21:49
  • @DavidSchwartz Why not share your lock-free version implementation? Tks, – Jeffery Feb 13 '17 at 21:51

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.