3

After default, control is supposed to automatically come out of switch loop. But C# requires use of a break statement? Why in C# control is not automatically coming out of switch loop after default?

The following microsoft doc say so: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/language-reference/keywords/switch

In my code:

using System;

class Program {
static void Main() {
    Console.WriteLine("Enter a number between 1 and 10");
    int num;
    bool validity = int.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out num);
    if(validity==true) {
        switch(num) {
            case 1:
            case 2:
            case 3:
            case 4:
            case 5:
            case 6:
            case 7:
            case 8:
            case 9:
            case 10:

                Console.WriteLine("You have entered {0}", num);
                break;
            default:
                Console.WriteLine("You have not entered a number between 1 and 10");
                //break; This part is commented
        }
    } 
    else {
        Console.WriteLine("Please make a valid input");
    }
}
} 

It gives me the error -

(23,5): error CS8070: Control cannot fall out of switch from final case label ('default:')

But on uncommenting the break part the code works fine.

  • 6
    The C# language specification just prohibits control from ever reaching the } of a switch statement. That makes all the cases more consistent with each other, and means they're easier to reorder. The fact that your default case is last is just a coincidence here. – Jon Skeet Dec 22 '17 at 9:11
  • Note that break is not the only way to achieve this. throw new Exception(); will also prevent control from reaching the }. You would not require break then. – bornfromanegg Dec 22 '17 at 9:21
  • This is similar to the other question, but it seems to be a little distinct from it. The other question deals with the last case in general, but this one deals specifically with default. The answers on the other question dealt mainly with the fact that requiring a break statement on the last case can often help with refactoring and consistency, which is true if that last label isn't default. They didn't seem to address why an exception was not provided in the language for default though. – Panzercrisis Feb 14 '18 at 18:46
3
switch(num) {
    case 1:
        DoSomething();
    case 2:
        DoSomething2();
    case 3:
    case 4:
    case 5:
        Console.WriteLine("You have entered {0}", num);
        break;
    default:
        Console.WriteLine("You have not entered a number between 1 and 10");
        //break; This part is commented
    case 6:
        DoSomething3();
}

In above code in case 1 you want only DoSomething() or DoSomething() and go to case 2? To avoid such mistakes (forgotten break).

You can have after default block another case and you can forgot add break.

  • C# prohibits fall-through except for empty cases (such as your 3 and 4 here). – Damien_The_Unbeliever Dec 22 '17 at 9:25
  • This needs a break in case 1, case 2, default, and case 6. I'm not sure what point is being made here. – bornfromanegg Dec 22 '17 at 9:28

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