7

I have to send 10000 messages. At the moment, it happens synchronously and takes up to 20 minutes to send them all.

// sending messages in a sync way
foreach (var message in messages)
{
    var result = Send(message);
    _logger.Info($"Successfully sent {message.Title}.")
}

To shorten the message sending time, I'd like to use async and await, but my concern is if C# runtime can handle 15000 number of tasks in the worker process.

var tasks = new List<Task>();
foreach (var message in messages) 
{
    tasks.Add(Task.Run(() => Send(message))
}

var t = Task.WhenAll(tasks);
t.Wait();
...

Also, in terms of memory, I'm not sure if it's a good idea to create a list of 15000 tasks

10
  • 4
    The TPL uses a thread pool and will not spawn a new thread for every Task.Run(). Dec 22, 2017 at 10:02
  • 3
    Just run this and see how it goes
    – Evk
    Dec 22, 2017 at 10:05
  • 4
    It will only shorten time if the send method can work in parallel.
    – Sir Rufo
    Dec 22, 2017 at 10:08
  • 4
    What are you using to do the send? There is a good chance it has async interface it is always best to use that for async. Dec 22, 2017 at 10:10
  • 5
    Have you considered using Parallel.ForEach as an alternative? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… Dec 22, 2017 at 10:15

1 Answer 1

7

Since I came home from work, I have played with this a bit and here is my answer.

First of all Parallel.ForEach is bretty cool to use, and with my 8 core runs very fast.

I suggest to limit the CPU usage so you do not use 100% capacity, but that depends on your system, I have made two suggestion for it.

The other things is you need to monitor and be sure that your sender server can eat all these jobs with out getting trouble.

Here is a the implementation:

public void MessMessageSender(List<Message> messages)
{
    try
    {
        var parallelOptions = new ParallelOptions();
        _cancelToken = new CancellationTokenSource();
        parallelOptions.CancellationToken = _cancelToken.Token;
        var maxProc = System.Environment.ProcessorCount;
        // this option use around 75% core capacity
        parallelOptions.MaxDegreeOfParallelism = Convert.ToInt32(Math.Ceiling(maxProc * 0.75));
        // the following option use all cores expect 1
        //parallelOptions.MaxDegreeOfParallelism = maxProc - 1;
        try
        {
            Parallel.ForEach(messages, parallelOptions, message =>
            {
                try
                {
                    Send(message);
                    //_logger.Info($"Successfully sent {text.Title}.");
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    //_logger.Error($"Something went wrong {ex}.");
                }
            });
        }
        catch (OperationCanceledException e)
        {
            //User has cancelled this request.
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        //What ever dispose of clients;
    }
}

My answer is inspired for this page.

Documentation:

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