5

I want to convert a timestamp to Beijing time. Should I use a filter or a method to implement this feature? What's the difference, such as the difference in performance?

1
  • You may use what you want because filter in Vue it is a function. Filter always receives the expression’s value (the result of the former chain) as its first argument. Between filters and functions there is no difference in performance. – Sergey Dec 22 '17 at 10:57
11

The displayed Beijing time only has to change when the underlying timestamp is changed. Methods should therefore not be used. Instead use computed properties or filters:

Using a computed property

new Vue() {
  data: {
    time: /* Your timestamp */
  },
  computed: {
    displayedTime() {
      /* Convert `this.time` to Beijing time */
    }
  }
}

In your template you can then do this:

{{ displayedTime }}

While this solution works, you can only use it for one timestamp (in this case time). Let's take a look at how you could do this with filters:

Using a filter

new Vue() {
  data: {
    time: /* Your timestamp */
  },
  filters: {
    displayedTime(timestamp) {
      /* Convert the `timestamp` argument to Beijing time */
    }
  }
}

In your template you can then do this:

{{ time | displayedTime }}

The advantage of this solution is that if you have another timestamp somewhere in your application you can use the same filter:

{{ otherTime | displayedTime }}

Make sure to use the Vue.filter() method if you want to make this filter work globally (outside of this Vue instance).

3
  • 1
    I'd add to this that you can also use the filters as normal methods, outside of the templates. Just import them like any util functions, and use them in your computed properties or methods as needed. – nickford Dec 22 '17 at 15:57
  • 1
    Unfortunately filters are not cached, i.e. they also get re-run at every update, unlike computed properties. Demo: next.plnkr.co/edit/pYSeoquEkyX8ZPI2 See also css-tricks.com/using-filters-vue-js – ghybs Aug 3 '18 at 5:24
  • 10
    Does this not mean they are exactly the same as methods, except in how they are called? – nicstella Aug 5 '18 at 21:29

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