-8

Preface

This question is meant as a canonical collection of the most frequent (beginner) mistakes using conditional statements like if() ... else or similar. Answers are meant to describe unexpected behaviors at runtime, syntactical flaws and misconceptions like

if(x) {}
else (y) {}

should not be addressed here.


Addressed issues

  • 10
    A decent compiler will at least warn about any of the things you can think of. This is not a good question for Stackoverflow.com. – rubenvb Dec 24 '17 at 10:45
  • I think I've read something like this on Code Complete 2 or somewhere... – pjpj Dec 24 '17 at 10:46
  • 6
    While the thought behind this canonical is very good, I don't think it's something that warrants a canonical dup at all. Novices fall into it by mistyping. Their problem is a typographical one. So it should be closed as one. – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Dec 24 '17 at 10:51
  • 6
    That's good. Problem is that if their post is closed as a duplicate of this instead of a "typo", it doesn't get automatically deleted by the system. So SO will start retaining these white noise questions en-masse. – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Dec 24 '17 at 10:56
  • 4
    @user0042 - Yes. Except you've just increased their minimum retention from 9 days to 30, or even a whole year. – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Dec 24 '17 at 11:02
7

Misconceptions of conditional expressions

  • if(x = 1) // ...
    

    Equality comparisons are expressed using the ==. = is an assignment, and the result is evaluated as a cast to bool. I.e. any value evaluated to != 0 results in true. As a prevention mechanism consider the below expressions:

  •    if(1 = x)  // invalid assignment compilation error!
       if(1 == x) // valid equality comparison
    

    A wrong use of an assignment operator can be avoided by always placing the constant on the left hand side of the expression. The compiler will flag any mistake triggering an invalid assignment error.

  • if(answer == 'y' || 'Y')
    

    Variations: if(answer == 'y','Y')
    Conditions must be tested with separate comparisons. The || operator binding doesn't do what's expected here. Use if(answer == 'y' || answer == 'Y')instead.

  • if (0 < x < 42)  
    

    Valid syntax in Python, with expected behaviour, that syntax is valid in C++, but parsed as if ((0 < x) < 42) so false/true converted to 0/1 and then tested against < 42 -> always true. Condition must be tested with separate comparisons: if (0 < x && x < 42)

5

Formatting and scoping errors

  • if(mycondition);
    {
        // Why this code is always executed ???
    }
    

    There's a superfluous ; after the if() statement.

  • if(mycondition)
         statement1();
         statement2(); // Why this code is always executed ???
    

    The code is equivalent to

    if(mycondition) {
         statement1();
    }
    statement2();
    

    statement2(); is outside the scope of the conditional block. Add {} to group statements.

  • if (mycondition)
         if (mycondition2)
             statement1();
     else
         statement2();
    

    The code is equivalent to

    if(mycondition) {
     if (mycondition2)
         statement1();
     else
         statement2();
    }
    

    else apply on previous if. Add {}:

    if (mycondition) {
        if (mycondition2)
             statement1();
    }
    else
        statement2();
    

The same applies for any wrongly placed ; in loop statements like

  •   for(int x = 0;x < 5;++x);
                           // ^
      {
           // statements executed only once
      }
    

or

  • while(x < 5);
             // ^
    {
        // statements executed only once
    }
    
-1
if (north) {

} else if (south) {

} else if (west) {

} else if (east) {

}

potential missing else-clause for wrong direction.

Funny placement of {} because they add them, misplace them and then delete the wrong ones.

if (a) {
}
if (b) {
}
if (c) {
}

missing else as only one of them should be done even if more is true.

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