10

In Coq, what's the difference between ... ?

  • Require X.
  • Import X.
  • Require Import X.

I have basically memorized some common patterns. I usually see code using Require Import X. Then there's Import ListNotation. And I just noticed it's also possible to write just Require X. What's the difference? Some practical examples would be appreciated.

1
14

Require loads a library whereas Import brings its definitions into scope. Require Import does both. If you only have the library loaded, you'll need to refer to names fully qualified. Coq allows top-level modules corresponding to files to define modules; these have to be imported separately to bring all of their definitions into scope, and they can't be Required - that's what's going on with ListNotations:

(* List is not loaded by default *)
Fail Check List.map.

(* the full name is technically Coq.Lists.List *)
Require List.

(* note that lists are actually defined in Coq.Init.Datatypes which is 
imported by default, so [list] is  unqualified and the [x::xs] notation is 
already defined *)
Print List.map.
(*
List.map =
fun (A B : Type) (f : A -> B) =>
fix map (l : list A) : list B :=
  match l with
  | nil => nil
  | (a :: t)%list => (f a :: map t)%list
  end
    : forall A B : Type, (A -> B) -> list A -> list B
*)

(* bring everything in List into scope *)
Import List.
(* this includes the ListNotations submodule *)
Import ListNotations.

(* note that now list notations are available, and the list notation scope is
open (from importing List) *)
Print List.map.
(*
map =
fun (A B : Type) (f : A -> B) =>
fix map (l : list A) : list B :=
  match l with
  | [] => []
  | a :: t => f a :: map t
  end
    : forall A B : Type, (A -> B) -> list A -> list B
*)

Note there are some quirks with how Coq handles modules, especially compared to other languages:

  • Coq does not require a full path to a module, only an unambiguous suffix. Indeed I rarely see full import paths, even to standard library modules.
  • Notations cannot be used except by importing the module, and unlike most objects there's no way to refer to a notation, fully qualified or otherwise.
  • Importing a module can have side effects, for example changing notation interpretation scopes or setting options if you use Global Set in the module being imported.
  • Importing is fairly limited (especially compared to Haskell) - there's no way to rename a module at import time, or selectively import some definitions.

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