2

I've written a program that reads four variables (three strings and one character) every line from a text file. But when I display the variables, an unexpected character pops up at the end of each line. (I've ensured that the lengths of the variables are large enough).

Why is this? (Overflowing buffers, again?) And how do I fix this?

Text file contents:

M0001 Cool Name F 123-456789
M0002 Name Cool M 987-654321

Code:

    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <stdlib.h>

    int main() {
        FILE *text;

        char id[6], name[101], gender, contact[13];

        text = fopen("test.txt", "r");
        while (fscanf(text, "%s %[^\n]s %c %s\n", id, name, &gender, contact) != EOF)
            printf("%s %s %c %s\n", id, name, gender, contact);
        fclose(text);

        return 0;

}

The output I expect:

M0001 Cool Name F 123-456789
M0002 Name Cool M 987-654321

What I get instead:

M0001 Cool Name F 123-456789 1⁄4
M0002 Name Cool M 987-654321 1⁄4
8
  • 3
    != EOF --> == 4 Then you would have found the problem immediately. Dec 26, 2017 at 12:32
  • @4386427 By doing this the program outputs... nothing. I don't understand?
    – lefrost
    Dec 26, 2017 at 12:35
  • That's because it only scans id and name; see my answer below. Dec 26, 2017 at 12:36
  • Exactly - it would print nothing and therefore you would know that there was some problem with the fscanf Dec 26, 2017 at 12:43
  • The idea is that checking actual against expected number of arguments gives you the chance to print an error message. fscanf itself does not give an error, because this way a program might be able to continue. In your case, however, there is no point in trying to.
    – Jongware
    Dec 26, 2017 at 12:51

3 Answers 3

5

in the call to fscanf(), the format string: "%s %[^\n]s %c %s\n" is not correct.

  1. the '[^\n]' will read to the end of the line (which will overflow the input buffer: `name'. Then the next char is NOT an 's' because the next character is the newline.
  2. should compare the returned value to 4, not EOF
  3. the input/format specifiers '%[...]' and '%s' have no problem overflowing the input buffer, so should ALWAYS have a MAX_CHARACTERS modifier that is one less than the length of the input buffer (those format specifiers always append a NUL byte to the input

The following proposed code:

  1. cleanly compiles
  2. documents why each header file is included
  3. performs the desired functionality
  4. splits the 'name' into 'firstname' and 'lastname' for easier handling and to match the format of the input data
  5. properly checks the returned value from fscanf()
  6. properly checks for any error from fopen() and if an error is returned, properly outputs the error message and the text indicating why the system thinks the function failed to stderr
  7. uses an appropriate format string for the calls to fscanf() and printf()
  8. replaces 'magic' numbers with meaningful names via a enum statement

And now the proposed code:

#include <stdio.h>   // fopen(), fclose(), fscanf(), perror(), printf()
#include <stdlib.h>  // exit(), EXIT_FAILURE


enum{
    MAX_ID_LEN = 6,
    MAX_NAME_LEN = 20,
    MAX_CONTACT_LEN = 13
};


int main( void )
{
    char id[ MAX_ID_LEN ];
    char firstname[ MAX_NAME_LEN ];
    char lastname[ MAX_NAME_LEN ];
    char gender;
    char contact[ MAX_CONTACT_LEN ];

    FILE *text = fopen("test.txt", "r");
    if( !text )
    {
        perror( "fopen to read 'test.txt' failed" );
        exit( EXIT_FAILURE );
    }

    // implied else, fopen successful

    while (5 == fscanf(text, "%5s %19s %19s %c %12s",
        id, firstname, lastname, &gender, contact) )
    {
        printf("%s %s %s %c %s\n",
            id, firstname, lastname, gender, contact);
    }

    fclose(text);
    return 0;
}
2
  • +1 for clean readable code and explanation. One doubt, Is there any way%5s be replaced w.r.t the enum MAX_ID_LEN ? Say - for some reason, the id length is changed, you have to modify in 2 places to make it work.
    – Sudhee
    Dec 26, 2017 at 14:12
  • @Sudhee, it used to be, in C, that this: while (5 == fscanf(text, "%5s %19s %19s %c %12s", could be written as: while (5 == fscanf(text, "%"MAX_ID_LEN"s %"MAX_NAME_LEN"s %"MAX_NAME_LEN"s %c %"MAX_CONTACT_LEN"s", However, that has not been working since the last time I received an update to the gcc compiler. Rather the compiler outputs a message similar to: .... error: expected ')' before 'MAX_ID_LEN' and ...warning: spurious trailing '&' in format [-Wformat=]. So far, I have not determined what changed in the syntax Dec 26, 2017 at 20:09
3

%[^\n]s eats up everything from that point on and puts it in name. So only id and name are filled. gender and contact have 'random' contents coming from the program stack (as they are not initialized).

By accident the your stack had 1/4 in gender + contact.

On my machine, the program crashes.

5
  • 2
    If it's always two words: %s %s, but if that's not the case (what I guess), you'd need to redesign the format and add a delimiter (e.g. ,) after the name part. Or you could scan until you see a free standing F or M; but that's a hack because some names might have that. Well, you could scan for the last occurrence of F or M, before you see a number; that would be acceptable, yet still a bit hacky. Dec 26, 2017 at 12:31
  • 1
    @Ryan: if the last 2 items are always there, perhaps you can clip them off and parse separately – say, using strrchr to locate the last space character. (There are multiple ways to do this.) That way, everything left after the first item is a name.
    – Jongware
    Dec 26, 2017 at 12:34
  • @meaning-matters If I were to use delimiters, say |, to separate each variable in the text file, how would I fscanf it then? Would it be %[^|] %[^|] %c %[^|]..? I don't really understand how to scan it.
    – lefrost
    Dec 26, 2017 at 12:50
  • @usr2564301 So if I were to use strrchr, how would my fscanf be like then? I tried %s %[^\n]s strrchr(%c) strrchr(%s) and I got the same result as previously. I'm probably using strrchr completely wrongly here... how exactly am I supposed to use it here?
    – lefrost
    Dec 26, 2017 at 12:58
  • 1
    @Ryan With | as delimiters, you better write a custom scanner: Skip leading space, copy characters to token buffer until next |, remove trailing space from token buffer, assign token value to variable (depending on state, i.e. where you are on the line), clear token buffer, and start again. Dec 26, 2017 at 13:22
0

As the number of space-delimited words in your name apparently is variable, you can only use %[^\n]s to grab "as much as possible" – but that will also eat up any and all following relevant data. A quick solution would be to re-design the input format and place the name at the very end; then, your fscanf argument would be:

"%s %c %s %s\n", id, &gender, contact, name

Alternatively, rewrite the code to use less fscanf and more 'manual' parsing:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <ctype.h>

int main (void)
{
    FILE *text;
    char id[6], name[101], gender, contact[13];
    char *lookback;
    int result;
    unsigned int line_number = 0;

    text = fopen ("test.txt", "r");
    if (text == NULL)
    {
        printf ("file not found!\n");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    do
    {
        result = fscanf(text, "%s %[^\n]s\n", id, name);
        line_number++;
        if (result == EOF)
            break;

        if (result != 2)
        {
            printf ("error in data file on line %u (expected at least 2 items)\n", line_number);
            break;
        }

        /* at this point, 'name' also contains 'gender' and 'contact' */
        lookback = strrchr (name, ' ');
        if (lookback == NULL || strlen(lookback+1) > 12)
        {
            printf ("error in data file on line %u (expected 'contact')\n", line_number);
            break;
        }
        /* lookback+1 because lookback itself points to the space */
        strcpy (contact, lookback+1);
        /* cut off at lookback */
        *lookback = 0;

        lookback = strrchr (name, ' ');
        if (lookback == NULL || strlen(lookback+1) != 1)
        {
            printf ("error in data file on line %u (expected 'gender')\n", line_number);
            break;
        }
        /* lookback now points to the space before the gender */
        gender = toupper(lookback[1]);
        if (gender != 'F' && gender != 'M')
        {
            printf ("error in data file on line %u (expected 'M' or 'F')\n", line_number);
            break;
        }
        /* cut off again at lookback; now name is complete */
        *lookback = 0;

        printf ("%s %s %c %s\n", id, name, gender, contact);
    } while (1);
    fclose(text);

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

This method does have a couple of associated drawbacks. One of the perks of scanf is that it normalizes whitespace; multiple spaces and tabs (or even returns) will silently be translated to a single space before scanning. This code, on the other hand, explicitly checks for a single space character. If there is variation in the whitespace in your data file, you must account for that as well.

With the last two items 'manually' processed, you can opt to not use fscanf at all. You can read an entire line of text at once with fgets (which also has a line length check built in) and look for spaces using strchr and strrchr. To counter possible whitespace problems, search the line for tabs and double spaces and change these to a single space.

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