17

What I mean is this:

Let's say we have a v-for directive in our custom vue component used in the following way:

<my-custom-component v-for="item in items" :key="item.id">{{item.remark}}</ my-custom-component>

What is the purpose of using :key="item.id" here?

1

7 Answers 7

22

Ordinarily in a v-for loop, a change in the ordering of your array elements can result in undesired behavior. Imagine, for example, if your child component happened to be a form with inputs containing data that you've filled in. If you reorder your array, then that input information doesn't move with your array elements! You would expect that when you reorder your array, any changes made in the child components would move with those array elements.

Having a unique key solves this problem. The key acts as a sort of flag that tells Vue "if the data associated with this child component is moved somewhere else, then move the component along with it to preserve the changes that already exist".

This is all explained in the documentation. I highly encourage you to read this section carefully.

Recommended is that you do not use the array index as the unique id value as that is essentially the same as using no key at all. Instead, include an id field in your data that you initialize from the very beginning. Then, you can do something like :key="item.id" or :key="'child-component-'+item.id".

4
  • 1
    That documentation also says, "Since it’s a generic mechanism for Vue to identify nodes, the key also has other uses that are not specifically tied to v-for, as we will see later in the guide," but then there's nothing else about keys on that page, and I believe this is the only other place keys are discussed in a similar context, with no new info. Know what that comment was about?
    – ruffin
    Apr 11, 2018 at 15:08
  • 1
    @ruffin Note the section in the link you provided stating "It can also be used to force replacement of an element/component instead of reusing it." Think of the alternative use of the key mechanism as a "force refresh" option for a component.
    – B. Fleming
    Apr 11, 2018 at 19:52
  • What does "patch each element in-place" as the document says really means? Which means of reordering element exists for the browser if not reordering items in DOM? Or am I misunderstanding the doc?
    – huggie
    Aug 20, 2019 at 10:51
  • @huggie It looks like the originally-linked section of the documentation was relocated. I've updated my original answer to point to the new location of the original section. I'm not entirely sure what they mean by that, but I would assume that they mean that they will replace the DOM elements with updated versions rather than reorder them. This is a very crucial distinction. It means that any state changes in the individual elements will not be preserved, e.g. expandable elements will revert to default state when moved around.
    – B. Fleming
    Aug 20, 2019 at 17:23
1

Actually key we need when some HTML tag is loading in the loop to make them unique.

If we are not providing key attribute, then vuejs will upload the same component with previous data.

let me know if you have any doubt.

for example

 <div v-for="item in items" :key="item.id">
    <!-- content -->
</div>

for more details,please refer the link: https://v2.vuejs.org/v2/guide/list.html

1
  • 2
    Thank you but would you please make up some simple self-explanatory example of it being used?
    – Bill
    Dec 26, 2017 at 12:54
0

in javascript array are not indexed correctly means, it can NOT return its value each time in same order.

so if you use v-for it basically render all the component one by one at first time

but suppose you are changing some data so its not feasible to render all that component instead it will compare changes from virtual DOM identify change and based on that key it will only render that element or even if it need to render all v-for element it can render them in order as before give.

so markup stays same and don't rendered in other order.

0

vue v-for + $.sortable + ajax

When you reorder element using jquery.sortable, post it to server then get new list using ajax, you will face strange behavior: Elements of the list will reorder. More then, some data-* values will mixed. Use :key to avoid such effects.

0

Actually for uniquely identification we need to use :key property.

For example:

<div v-for="item in items" :key="id">
---
</div>

OR

<div v-for="(item, index) in items" :key="index">
---
</div>

In database, we have a primary key id. We can compare with that concept. We use :key to identify unique item inside the array iteration.

An explanation:

0  -  Apple
1  -  Mango
2  -  Orange
3  -  Apple

Now, we can get two apple with two separate key

I hope it will be clear. :-)

3
  • Do NOT use the index as key. If you add "Banana" at the top of your list, then all the other keys will be incremented by 1 and you'll miss the correct bindings.
    – logi-kal
    May 3, 2021 at 9:41
  • Yes. You are right. Thank you. Then what should we use in :key May 3, 2021 at 9:44
  • Check my answer below.
    – logi-kal
    May 3, 2021 at 12:08
0

Say you have a list of three (checkable) items, and you want to add a fourth item on top of your list.

If you don't use the key, when you add the fourth item you'll miss the correct bindings, and the items that were checked will be shifted.

Vue.component('my-item', {
  props: {
    item: {
      type: Object,
      required: true,
    },
  },
  data() {
    return {
          isDone: false,
    };
  },
  template: `
    <div>
      <input type="checkbox" :id="item.id" v-model="isDone">
      <label :for="item.id">{{ item.text }}</label>
    </div>
  `
})

new Vue({
  el: "#app",
  methods: {
    addItem() {
        this.items.unshift(
          {
            id: 1000 + this.items.length,
            text: 'Item' + (this.items.length + 1)
          }
      );
    }
  },
  data() {
    return {
      items: [
        { id: 1000, text: "Item1" },
        { id: 1001, text: "Item2" },
        { id: 1002, text: "Item3" }
      ]
    };
  }
})
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/vue/2.5.17/vue.min.js"></script>
<div id="app">
  <my-item v-for="item in items" :item="item"> 
  </my-item>

  <button @click="addItem">
    Add new item
  </button>
</div>

If instead you assign a key to each item this won't happen:

Vue.component('my-item', {
  props: {
    item: {
      type: Object,
      required: true,
    },
  },
  data() {
    return {
          isDone: false,
    };
  },
  template: `
    <div>
      <input type="checkbox" :id="item.id" v-model="isDone">
      <label :for="item.id">{{ item.text }}</label>
    </div>
  `
})

new Vue({
  el: "#app",
  methods: {
    addItem() {
        this.items.unshift(
          {
            id: 1000 + this.items.length,
            text: 'Item' + (this.items.length + 1)
          }
      );
    }
  },
  data() {
    return {
      items: [
        { id: 1000, text: "Item1" },
        { id: 1001, text: "Item2" },
        { id: 1002, text: "Item3" }
      ]
    };
  }
})
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/vue/2.5.17/vue.min.js"></script>
<div id="app">
  <my-item v-for="item in items" :item="item" :key="item.id"> 
  </my-item>

  <button @click="addItem">
    Add new item
  </button>
</div>

Please notice the :key="item.id" part.

0

When it comes to list rendering, how VueJS updates the DOM to reflect the new state-of-world is conceptually similar to how to mutate a string into another with minimal number of steps:

Given a string "AABCA" and a new string "ABACA", there could be more than one way of changing the original string to the new string:

  1. you can change the second A to B, and the third B to A
  2. you can swap the second A with the third B
  3. you can delete the first A, and insert a new A after the B

This list can go on.

So without additional information, it is impossible to tell how exactly is the string meant to be changed, e.g. the intention of whoever submitted the mutation.

Keep in mind that VueJS is declarative - all it has are two snapshots: the vDOM structure at the moment and the new vDOM structure desired. Its job is to find the most efficient way to convert the vDOM from its current shape to the desired shape. Animation aside, you might argue (and you might be correct) that whatever mutation strategy VueJS takes to update the vDOM does not really matter as long as they all result in the same end state. E.g. even if the real intention is to swap two elements, it would still be fine that VueJS interprets it as not a swap but two individual changes. However, this only works when there is no "internal/transient state" maintained by the child component/dom element.:

Imagine you are rendering ['A', 'B'] as two input elements whose labels (title, or placeholder text) are 'A' and 'B'. Now you swap the array and make it ['B', 'A']. Your intention is to swap, and you would expect to see the two input elements swapped on screen instead of

  • destroyed and recreated fresh so that user input text is all gone
  • the label of the first input changed to 'B' (and the second to 'A'), but the input text was kept as-is.

What is lacking here, as you can see, is a way to convey to VueJS that the 'B' in ['B', 'A'] is the same 'B' in the previous ['A', 'B'], so whatever DOM structure VueJS created for the previous 'B' should be kept and associated with the current 'B'. In other words, you need to tell VueJS what is the identity of 'B', or, more accurately, the identity of the vDOM node 'B' is meant to be associated with.

This identity is called key.

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