-5

i want to make a function.

every timer ticks it will flash green color and every second timer ticks it will close green color.

i have a timer in my win forms which is 100 ms interval.

so every 200 ms my color will flash as green..

can you help me about it

this doesnt work

var green = (((float)System.Environment.TickCount / 100) % 2) != 0;
if (green==true)
 {
greenColor);
if (green==false)
{                                 
noColor);
}
  • This code doesn't even compile. Is this your actual code? – Joe Dec 27 '17 at 13:29
  • its psedeu code , – DROGBAaa Dec 27 '17 at 13:30
  • @DROGBAaa Can you explain this: every timer ticks it will flash green color and every second timer ticks it will close green color. i have a timer in my win forms which is 100 ms interval. so every 200 ms my color will flash as green.. I honestly don't quite understand the plan here -EDIT- My bad misunderstood what you meant by tick – EpicKip Dec 27 '17 at 13:32
  • the plan is for example green will flash and 100ms later red will flash and 100 ms later green will flash again and again... i'm making a color warning with serialport.. – DROGBAaa Dec 27 '17 at 13:32
  • Stop trying to do it with modulo, and use a boolean variable and boolean logic instead. Put the variable at the form level so it keeps it's value. In your timer event handler, use if (isGreen) { noColor; isGreen = false; } else { isGreen = true; greencolor; }; instead. – Ken White Dec 27 '17 at 13:36
5

Because you have 2 states (color or no color) that swap each time I recommend to use a bool and just invert its value at the end of the timer-tick like so:

bool tick;
private void theTimer_Tick( object sender, EventArgs e )
{
    if(tick)
    {
        colorLabel.BackColor = Color.Red;//Using label as example
    }
    else
    {
        colorLabel.BackColor = Color.Green;
    }
    tick = !tick;//Invert tick bool
}

This way you don't need the time of the counter and don't have to calculate all sorts of things.

  • how do i get the interval of my timer? i mean what is the tick ? – DROGBAaa Dec 27 '17 at 13:42
  • 1
    No need to use a variable, just do an inline if with the color: colorLabel.BackColor = colorLabel.BackColor == Color.Red ? Color.Green : Color.Red; – Gusman Dec 27 '17 at 13:43
  • @DROGBAaa You don't need the tick to change color, use a bool. true = red, false is not. Then set its value to the opposite in the end. Every tick will be A or B – EpicKip Dec 27 '17 at 13:53
  • epicKip thanks . if i want to increase color flash time what should i do?. i dont want to change my interval time, it will stays as 100 ms. but if i wanted to change colors every 500 ms, whats the proper way of doing it? – DROGBAaa Dec 27 '17 at 14:15
  • @DROGBAaa Easiest way I can think of off the top of my head is just doing a counter and do tickCounter++ every time and if(tickCounter % 5 == 0) :) – EpicKip Dec 27 '17 at 14:23
0

You were almost there. Just don't use (float). Use integer arithmetic.

bool green = (System.Environment.TickCount / 100) % 2 == 0;

If you use floating point remainder (which I don't recommend), then your test should not be == 0 it should be < 1. Otherwise it'll only be green for 1 ms when the division remainder is precisely zero.

bool green = (((float)System.Environment.TickCount / 100) % 2) < 1;
  • well this works at the beginning, but after 3-5 seconds, its not arithmetic, sometimes after 5 seconds it doesnt flash my green.. its not always goes like 0 -1 - 0 - 1 sometimes goes 0-0-1-0-1--1- 0 etc. – DROGBAaa Dec 27 '17 at 14:02
  • 1
    This won't work. The timer is not guaranteed to execute this code every 100ms. It will execute it approximately every 100ms. This code basically has a 50/50 shot of working every 100ms. – Amy Dec 27 '17 at 14:06
  • Obviously if you don't care about synchronization then just flip the bool when the timer fires, I agree. But since this answer will hit on TickCount searches, I thought I should explain a technique that explains the problem with the code. The use of TickCount has the nice feature that it stays synchronized to system time. So just boost the timer interval up to the nyquist frequency of the display. (Likely 8 ms or less). For what it's worth, this is the technique that we use in video games with high refresh rate. – Wyck Dec 27 '17 at 15:08

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