1

I am trying to implement a variation of the Brent-Salamin algorithm in R. It works well for the first 25 iterations, but then, it behaves unexpectedly, returning negative results.

The algorithm I want to implement is:

initial values:
x_0 = 1; y_0 = 1/sqrt(2); z_0 = 1/2

x_n = (x_n-1 + y_n-1)/2 
y_n = sqrt(x_n-1 * y_n-1)
z_n = z_n-1 - 2^n * (x_n^2-y_n^2)

p_n = (2 * x_n^2) / z_n

where n is the current iteration.

A more beautifully formatted formula is here.

The code I figured out is:

mypi <- function(n){

  x = 1
  y = 1/sqrt(2)
  z = 1/2
  iteration = 0

  while(iteration < n){
    iteration = iteration + 1

    newx = (x + y) / 2
    y = sqrt(x * y)
    x = newx
    z = z-(2^iteration * (x^2 - y^2))
    p = (2 * x^2) / z
  }

  return(p)
}

Output:

> mypi(10)
[1] 3.141593
> mypi(20)
[1] 3.141593
> mypi(50)
[1] -33.34323

So as I am new to R, is there a bug in my code or is it the algorithm?

  • Where does i come from? – AdamO Dec 27 '17 at 15:45
  • @AdamO It's supposed to be iteration, not i – Tim Biegeleisen Dec 27 '17 at 15:46
  • 1
    After playing around with your code for about 20 minutes, I don't have an exact answer, and I'm not sure there is one, other than the explanation is probably due to the limitations of floating point arithmetic. I got it to work for almost 50 iterations before I started seeing negative numbers. I think after so many iterations, the 2^iteration term in z has become so large, and the x^2 - y^2 term has become so small, that rounding etc. starts to kick in. The negative number you see is just an artifact. – Tim Biegeleisen Dec 27 '17 at 15:48
  • I edited the question to fix the i issue, and also to provide some example output. – Claus Wilke Dec 27 '17 at 15:52
  • @TimBiegeleisen it's pretty surprising though. In my implementation there is a factor p which multiplies itself by two each iteration. Is it perhaps something wrong with the ^ operator? – AdamO Dec 27 '17 at 23:39
11

Your code simply messes up because it does not agree with the algorithm as written in the wiki page. A correct version looks like this:

mypi <- function(n){

  x = 1
  y = 1/sqrt(2)
  z = 1/4
  p <- 1

  iteration = 0

  while(iteration < n){
    iteration = iteration + 1

    newx = (x + y) / 2
    y = sqrt(x * y)
    # x = newx
    # z = z-(2^iteration * (x^2 - y^2))
    z = z- p* (x-newx)^2
    p = 2*p
    x = newx
  }

  (newx + y)^2/(4*z)
}

Gives

> mypi(10)
[1] 3.141593
> mypi(20)
[1] 3.141593
> mypi(50)
[1] 3.141593
  • Nice catch...I wouldn't have thought to check for the accuracy of the code itself +1 – Tim Biegeleisen Dec 27 '17 at 16:00
  • Thank you for your answer. As I wrote in the first sentence of my question, I was trying to implement a (given) variation of the algorithm, but because of the results I wasn't sure about its accuracy. This is why I asked at the end of my question if there are any bugs in the R code or if the problem is the algorithm itself! So if the variation is wrong for more than ~25 iterations, but the implementation of the variation is ok, this would answer my question and be very helpful to me. So did you find any problems within the implementation of the 'wrong' algorithm, too? – amadeusamadeus Dec 27 '17 at 16:35
  • @amadeusamadeus If you want to debug the algorithm, I think the folks at math.stackexchange.com should be able to help you. I am not 100% certain how you derived this... it kind of looks like Householder's algorithm for some arctangent value that gives a fraction of $\pi$. Anyway, your algorithm matches the beautifully formatted formula, so no issue there. One last thing to consider: most algorithms terminate not based on running fixed iterations like you've done, but when the value achieves a target precision. 50 iterations could be reaching the limits of floating point precision... – AdamO Dec 28 '17 at 23:17
  • @amadeusamadeus to check this, I would return the various arithmetic combinations (x,y values) in an array. Geometrically, good approximations will come from functions that are very well behaved around the target value. – AdamO Dec 28 '17 at 23:18

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